Dr. Mary Vaccaro

Dr. Mary Vaccaro

Dr. Mary Vaccaro

Art History
Professor & Area Coordinator
Ph.D., Columbia University
FA-299
vaccaro@uta.edu

Mary Vaccaro specializes in Renaissance art, especially sixteenth-century northern Italian painting and drawing.  She wrote a book on the paintings of Parmigianino (2002) after co-authoring a volume on the same artist's drawings (2000), both of which were published by Umberto Allemandi & C. (Turin and London) in four versions: two special editions, respectively in English and Italian, sponsored by a major Italian corporation, followed by commercial editions in English and Italian. Numerous essays and book reviews by her have appeared in journals and anthologies, notably, Apollo, The Burlington Magazine, Master Drawings, Renaissance Studies, and the Revue du Louvre et des musées de France.  As an authority on the School of Parma, she has been a guest lecturer in conjunction with exhibits including "Correggio and Parmigianino: Master Draftsmen of the Renaissance" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (2001), "The Art of Parmigianino" at the Frick Art Collection (2004), and “Parma” at the Museum of Western Art in Tokyo (2007), as well as an invited speaker at the major international conferences on Parmigianino (2002) and Correggio (2008), sponsored by the Italian Ministry of Culture. Dr. Vaccaro is the recipient of prestigious fellowships including the American Academy in Rome Prize, multiple Fulbright-Hays program awards to Italy, and a post-doctoral fellowship at the Harvard University Center for Renaissance Studies, Villa I Tatti, Florence, Italy (awarded annually to 15 scholars of Renaissance studies worldwide). More recently, she held a J. Clawson Mills senior fellowship in the Department of Drawings and Prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (2007-08) to research the use and exchange of drawings among artists in the School of Parma, including less familiar but remarkably talented draftsmen such as Michelangelo Anselmi and Giorgio Gandini del Grano, for a forthcoming book titled Disegno: On the use and exchange of drawings in sixteenth-century Parma. Another of her current projects, titled Donatello to Annibale Carracci: Italian Renaissance Drawings in French Regional Collections (ca. 1450-1600),intends more broadly to explore changes in the practice of and attitude toward disegno throughout the Italian peninsula by utilizing the rich but relatively unknown collections in French regional museums. During the summers of 2011 and 2012, seed grants from the Texas Fund for Curatorial Research have allowed her to survey the holdings in over a dozen museums, to date, throughout France.

Recent Research and Writing

Mentis Faculty Profile URL Research Statement