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Fall 2007

Undergraduate Course Descriptions for ENGL

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ENGL 0300. DEVELOPMENTAL READING COMPREHENSION & WRITING INSTRUCTION (3-0) Offers assistance to students who require developmental education for the reading and/or writing section of THEA. Instruction in comprehending college-level reading material and principles of writing short academic essays in standard written English. In addition, students who need to raise their THEA reading score for Texas Education Certification may enroll. This course may not be submitted for any other English course. Credit in this course does not fulfill any degree requirement. Includes sample THEA tests, test-taking strategies, and may include computerized instructions in reading and writing.

ENGL 0301. DEVELOPMENTAL ESL READING COMPREHENSION & WRITING INSTRUCTION (3-0) Offers assistance to students who require developmental education for the reading and/or writing section of THEA. Instruction in comprehending college-level reading material and principles of writing short academic essays in standard written English. For ESL, (English as a Second Language) students. This course may not be substituted for any other English course. Credit in this course does not fulfill any degree requirement. Includes sample THEA tests, test-taking strategies, and may include computerized instructions in reading and writing.

ENGL 1301. CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING I (3-0) (ENGL 1301). The critical thinking about, and reading and writing of, referential/expository discourse. Introduction to inventional procedures. Writing assignments focusing on identification and development of a subject, on organization, audience analysis, style, and the revision process.

ENGL 1302. CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING II (3-0) (ENGL 1302). Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on critical thinking about, and reading and writing of, argumentative discourse. Introduction to inventional procedures such as types of proofs and claims and the Toulmin model. Writing assignments focusing on the identification, development, and support of propositions of fact, cause, value, and policy.

ENGL 2303. TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3-0) May include topics in film and literature, women in literature, short story, and autobiography. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 2305. INTERMEDIATE HONORS EXPOSITION (3-0) An intermediate writing course that includes generating ideas, collecting data, determining audience, and organizing material into clear, coherent compositions. May be repeated for credit with permission of the Honors College director. Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors College.

ENGL 2309. WORLD LITERATURE (3-0) (ENGL 2332). Significant works of world literature with emphasis on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking. Examines at least three genres and six authors.

ENGL 2319. BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0) (ENGL 2322). Significant British works with emphasis on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking; at least three genres and six authors considered.

ENGL 2329. AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0) (ENGL 2327). Consideration of significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values; emphasis on critical methods of reading, writing, and thinking; at least three genres and six authors considered.

ENGL 2350. INTRODUCTION TO TEXTUAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION (3-0) Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors.

ENGL 2371. HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3-0) Consideration of significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values from America's beginnings to 1850.

ENGL 2372. HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3-0) Consideration of significant American works with a focus on ideas and the ways in which they reflect cultural and aesthetic values from 1850 to the present.

ENGL 3300. SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3-0) May include topics on Utopian literature, the American short story, Southwestern American literature, and modern British fiction. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 3301. RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3-0) The works of major Russian authors during the period from the beginning of Russian literature until the 1917 Revolution. The interrelationship of various literary movements and philosophies. Students receiving Russian credit will be required to compare selected translations with the original works and must complete a research or translation project. ENGL 3301: Study of representative works of the major Russian writers from Pushkin through Chekhov. Offered as ENGL 3301 and RUSS 3301; credit will be granted in only one department.

ENGL 3306. SOVIET AND POST-SOVIET LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3-0) RUSS 3306: The works of major Soviet and post-Soviet authors from 1917 to the present against the background of unfolding social and political development in the USSR and post-USSR. May be repeated for credit as topics and periods vary. Students receiving credit in Russian will complete a translation or research project using the Russian language. Also listed as ENGL 3306; credit will be given in only one department. ENGL 3306: Study of representative works of Russian writers immediately preceding the 1917 Revolution; of writing by Soviet authors acceptable to the Communist regime as well as by dissident voices; of the works from the period of glasnost; and of works written after the dissolution of the USSR. Also listed as RUSS 3306; credit will be granted in only one department.

ENGL 3339. CLASSICAL BACKGROUNDS (3-0) Literature of the Greco-Roman world including, but not limited to, The Odyssey, selected Greek tragedies, The Aeneid, Metamorphoses, and selected lyrics, epigrams, and satires.

ENGL 3340. HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0) American literature from its beginnings as related to the development of American culture; may include the study of canon formation.

ENGL 3341. AMERICAN DRAMA (3-0) Dramatic structure and techniques, as well as the study of drama in its cultural contexts.

ENGL 3342. AMERICAN POETRY (3-0) Examines the forms, traditions, and cultural contexts of the poetry of the United States. May include the relationship between American poetry and poetry written in English elsewhere. May include the relationship between American poetry and poetry written in other languages.

ENGL 3344. AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE (3-0) Offers an introduction to American Indian literatures or focuses on a particular genre, period or topic.

ENGL 3345. AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0) Offers an introduction to African American literature or focuses on a particular genre, period or topic.

ENGL 3346. MEXICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0) Offers an introduction to Mexican American literature or focuses on a particular genre, period or topic.

ENGL 3347. TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURES (3-0) Either an intensive focus within one tradition or a comparison between two or more traditions. Topics may include Asian-American literature, the American Indian novel, the Harlem Renaissance, Jewish-American literature, Mexican-American and American Indian literatures, classic American Renaissance literature and African American literature. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 3351. HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I (3-0) British literature and language from their origins through the 18th century, as they relate to the development of British culture.

ENGL 3352. HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II (3-0) British literature from the Romantic period to the present, as it relates to the development of British culture.

ENGL 3355. POST-COLONIAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH (3-0) Offers an introduction to literatures of once-colonial nations, focusing on theory as well as practice and on new relations to and divergences from the imperial center. Texts might include poetry, fiction, drama, film and critical theory. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 3361. HISTORY OF WORLD LITERATURE I (3-0) Examines the literature of the world, from antiquity to 1700.

ENGL 3362. HISTORY OF WORLD LITERATURE II (3-0) Examines the literature of the world, from 1700 to the present.

ENGL 3364. GAY AND LESBIAN LITERATURE (3-0) Examines modern representations of same-sex desire in relation to a variety of texts---religious, philosophical, literary and scientific--from the ancient world up through the 'invention' of homosexuality in the nineteenth century.

ENGL 3370. WOMEN IN LITERATURE (3-0) Works by women writers and/or images of women in literature. May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes. Offered as ENGL 3370 and WOMS 3370; credit will be granted in only one department.

ENGL 3371. ADVANCED EXPOSITION (3-0) An advanced writing course emphasizing writing that explains, demonstrates, or explores a subject. Attention given to audience, invention, style (coherence, unity, and clarity), and to the revision process.

ENGL 3372. COMPUTERS AND WRITING (3-0) An advanced writing course, conducted in a computerized classroom. An emphasis on rhetorical analyses of electronic discourse and writing in electronic environments.

ENGL 3373. Technical Writing (3-0) Processes of researching, drafting, editing, revising, and designing technical reports, proposals, manuals, resumes, and professional correspondence for specific audiences. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3374. WRITING, RHETORIC, AND MULTIMEDIA AUTHORING I (3-0) Introduction to the rhetorical structure of multimedia. An emphasis on composing writing-intensive and research-oriented projects for academic, business, and/or creative audiences. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3375. CREATIVE WRITING (3-0) Introduction to creative writing in formats that may include workshop, lecture, and individual conference. Students will write in two or three genres, including poetry, prose fiction, and other forms.

ENGL 3376. BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL WRITING (3-0) An advanced writing course, taught in a computerized classroom, that focuses on writing in the workplace. Emphasis is placed upon producing business and professional documents based on current, standardized formats; considering the role of audience; writing in a clear, concise, and appropriate style; and revising texts to improve their effectiveness. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302.

ENGL 3384. STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH (3-0) Introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for effective writing.

ENGL 3385. SPECIAL TOPICS IN RHETORIC (3-0) Various topics including legal rhetorics, American Civil Rights rhetorics, the rhetorics of Cybercultures, and the rhetorics of print and electronic essays, fiction, poetry, advertisements, or video and film. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 3390. HONORS COLLOQUIUM (3-0) An interdisciplinary course designed to meet the needs of advanced undergraduates in the Honors College. Prerequisite: participation in the Honors College and/or permission of instructor.

ENGL 4301. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3-0) The sounds and structure of the English language from pre-history to the present.

ENGL 4307. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1800 (3-0) May concentrate on a topic, on a particular historical era, or on one to three significant authors. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 4308. SELECTED AMERICAN AUTHORS AFTER 1910 (3-0) An intensive study of one to three authors. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4311. AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1800-1860 (3-0) Literary movements, such as Romanticism, in their cultural contexts; may include essays, journals, and poetry by transcendentalists such as Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller, as well as the fiction, poetry, autobiography, and/or criticism of such writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, and Melville.

ENGL 4312. AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1860-1910 (3-0) Literary movements such as Realism and Naturalism in their cultural contexts; may draw upon such writers as Dickinson, Whitman, Twain, Howells, Crane, Chopin, Gilman, and James.

ENGL 4313. AMERICAN LITERATURE 1900-PRESENT (3-0) Examines modern and contemporary literary movements in their cultural contexts. Genres studied may include fiction, poetry, drama, and literary criticism.

ENGL 4321. MEDIEVAL BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0) Literature of England from its beginnings to the end of the 15th century. Formerly listed as 3303. Credit cannot be received for both 3303 and 4321.

ENGL 4322. SIXTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0) Poetry, prose, and drama of the 16th century. The works of Spenser, Sidney, or the sonneteers may be emphasized.

ENGL 4323. SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0) Seventeenth century prose, poetry, drama. May include a study of Milton.

ENGL 4324. RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE (3-0) Literature of England from 1660 to 1798, centering on various representative works with attention to literary forms and historical contexts.

ENGL 4325. CHAUCER (3-0) Works of the 14th-century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer. Examination of his works, intellectual milieu, and literary influence.

ENGL 4326. SHAKESPEARE (3-0) Selected plays by Shakespeare in their historical and literary context. May include his nondramatic works.

ENGL 4330. ADVANCED LITERARY WRITING (3-0) Intensive creative writing in one literary genre in formats that may include workshop, lecture, and individual conference. Students will write in a single literary form, including poetry, prose fiction, creative nonfiction, autobiography, drama, or other genre. May be repeated for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: ENGL 3375.

ENGL 4331. THE BRITISH ROMANTICS (3-0) Works of authors from the last decades of the 18th century to well into the 19th century. The works of one or more of the major Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats) may be emphasized.

ENGL 4332. THE VICTORIANS (3-0) Literature of England, 1830-1900. May focus on major figures, major themes, or issues in social, ethical, and aesthetic thought.

ENGL 4333. LITERARY GENRES (3-0) May include such topics as modern British drama, the continental novel, patterns of narrative. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4334. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0) May include such topics as the Arthurian theme in literature, innocence and experience, love as a theme in literature. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4336. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0) Important themes, movements, regions, genres, or cross-cultural relationships. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.

ENGL 4337. SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (3-0) May include such topics as literature and psychoanalysis or literature and revolution. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4338. TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0) Literature of England from the turn of the century to the present focusing on major figures, major themes, or literary movements. May include major Irish works.

ENGL 4339. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION: HISTORY, THEORY, AND PRACTICE (3-0) Surveys the history of rhetorical theory and practices from its earliest formulations in Greek and Roman antiquity to its current manifestations in composition studies.

ENGL 4340. LITERATURE BY WOMEN (3-0) Focus on women's writing in a particular genre or historical period or on a concept or issue of importance to women writers. May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes. Offered as ENGL 4340 and WOMS 4340; credit will be granted only once.

ENGL 4344. TOPICS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDY (3-0) Analysis of texts primarily for their use of language or their engagement with linguistic issues. May include Old English, the emergence of the vernacular, literature and dialect, global English, or slang. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4345. TOPICS IN CRITICAL THEORY (3-0) May include the study of major figures (e.g., Agamben, Barthes, Foucault, Levinas, Said, Spivak) or topics (e.g., aesthetics, digital technology, disability studies, feminist view of science, film theory). May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4346. TOPICS IN THEORIES OF LANGUAGE AND DISCOURSE (3-0) May include the in-depth study of a major theorist (e.g., Dennett, Halliday, Lakoff, Pinker, Pratt, Quine) or a broader survey of related theories (e.g., discourse analysis; evolutionary theories of language and mind; integrational linguistics; speech-act theory) that investigate "language-in-general" and/or "language-in-use" and that question the limitations of these terms. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4350. TOPICS IN FILM AND LITERATURE (3-0) An introduction to the study of film and the techniques of film analysis. Compares films to literary or other texts. Considers films in relation to history, critical theory, and culture. Topics may include Nature in Film, Shakespeare in Film, American Indian Film and Literature, the British Novel as Film. May be repeated for credit as content changes.

ENGL 4355. LITERARY CRITICISM I (3-0) Readings and discussion of classics of literary criticism from Plato through Pater. Primary focus on traditional answers to the question of the nature and function of the literary critic. Formerly taught as 3327. Credit cannot be received for both 3327 and 4355.

ENGL 4356. LITERARY CRITICISM II (3-0) Readings,discussion and practical application of 20th-century and contemporary methodologies such as new criticism; formalism; structuralism; poststructuralism; reader-response criticism; psychoanalysis; Marxism; theories of gender, sexuality, and race; and cultural studies.

ENGL 4365. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (3-0) A survey of literature for children; analysis of outstanding authors and illustrators of that literature. Designed for prospective elementary teachers.

ENGL 4366. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE (3-0) A survey of literature for adolescents and young adults, with attention to theoretical perspectives and cultural contexts. Designed for prospective middle-school and secondary-school teachers.

ENGL 4370. THEORY AND PRACTICE: READING/COMPOSITION (3-0) A series of workshops in the theory and practice of reading and composition.

ENGL 4371. ADVANCED ARGUMENTATION (3-0) Examines classical and contemporary theories of argumentation and applies them to academic and non-academic writing. Assignments focus on both the analysis and the production of argumentative discourse in various forms (e.g., academic essays, advertising, editorials, political speeches, etc.)

ENGL 4374. WRITING, RHETORIC, AND MULTIMEDIA AUTHORING II (3-0) Advanced study of the rhetorical structure of multimedia. An emphasis on composing writing-intensive and research-oriented projects for academic, business, and creative audiences. Prerequisite: ENGL 3374.

ENGL 4377. TOPICS IN SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (3-0) Explores issues in the rhetorical, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions of science and technology. May be repeated for credit as course content changes.

ENGL 4380. CLASSICAL LITERATURE (3-0) Greek and Roman masterpieces of prose and poetry, especially those which most deeply affected the development of Western literature.

ENGL 4381. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (3-0) Various aspects of Western literature from the Fifth to the end of the 15th century. May focus on major figures and their milieu and heritage or on particular genres, themes, or topics.

ENGL 4382. RENAISSANCE & BAROQUE LITERATURE (3-0) Aspects of Western literature of the 16th and 17th Centuries. May focus on Petrarchan, anti-Petrarchan, Platonic, and anti-Platonic poetry; meditative poetry; drama or the relationship of literature and the arts, with special attention to Mannerism and Baroque and Rococo styles. Course may be repeated when content changes.

ENGL 4383. NEOCLASSICISM & ROMANTICISM (3-0) Tenets and dicta of Neoclassicism with examples from the drama, satire, and epic works from the period of Corneille through the 18th century; the growth of Romanticism from its emergence in Enlightenment thought through its displacement of Realism, with emphasis on English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish poetry, fiction, drama, and essay.

ENGL 4384. REALISM & NATURALISM (3-0) Realistic and Naturalistic fiction and drama from their beginnings in Romanticism through their displacement by Impressionism. Examples drawn from the literature of France, Germany, Russia, Italy, Spain, England, and the Americas.

ENGL 4385. MODERNISM (3-0) Major works of the early and mid-twentieth century in Europe that belong to the movement known as Modernism. May include the study of Freud and literature, Impressionism, Surrealism, and Existentialism.

ENGL 4386. DANTE (3-0) In depth study of The Divine Comedy and The New Life as the culminating works of the Middle Ages.

ENGL 4387. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (3-0) Contemporary literary forms and movements.

ENGL 4388. MAJOR FIGURES IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (3-0) Works by writers who have contributed significantly to world literature. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission.

ENGL 4390. INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH (0-9) Provides the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills learned in English classes to practical situations by working in a business related to the discipline.

ENGL 4391. LITERATURE CONFERENCE COURSE (3-0) Requires permission of the department chair and the instructor.

ENGL 4394. HONORS THESIS/SENIOR PROJECT (0-0) Required of all students in the University Honors College. During the senior year, the student must complete a thesis or project of equivalent difficulty under the direction of a faculty member in the major department.

ENGL 4399. SENIOR SEMINAR (3-0) Capstone course for English majors. A writing-intensive, seminar-style, in-depth study of a topic. Content may consist of a figure or figures, a period, a literary movement, a thematic, or a critical theory. Prerequisite: ENGL 2350 and completion of 18 hours of required 3000 - 4000 level English courses.

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