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Fall 2007

Southwestern Studies

6th Floor, Central Library • Box 19497 • 817-272-3997
Course Descriptions

The Southwestern Studies minor fosters an interdisciplinary examination of an historically and culturally significant region—the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. The program offers opportunities for students to explore important topics in a regional context, including multicultural diversity, economic development, political and social change, art and literature, environment, cultural and historical geography, historical cartography, and architectural and urban history. The minor is supported by faculty from seven departments and is sponsored by the University’s Center for Greater Southwestern Studies and the History of Cartography, which promotes the use of the UT Arlington Special Collections and the Minority Cultures Collection in the Central Library.

With the permission of their departmental advisor, students enroll in 18 hours selected primarily from the courses listed below. These hours must be distributed among at least three different departments.

Some of the following courses change content from offering to offering and might not be relevant to the minor during a particular year. In addition, special topics courses and/or courses taught outside the College of Liberal Arts may also be used to fulfill the Southwestern Studies minor with the permission of the Director of Southwestern Studies. For these reasons it is important that students consult with the Southwestern Studies faculty advisor before registering each semester.

Southwestern Studies

Director

Professor Francaviglia


A detailed listing of specific course fee information is available in the online student Schedule of Classes at www.uta.edu/schedule/.

Anthropology

ANTH 3333. NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (3-0) 3 hours credit. North American Indian cultures and their development both before and after European contact.

ANTH 3350. NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Prehistoric cultural adaptations in North America from human arrival to European contact. Topics treated include the question of when and where the first Native Americans arrived; the beginnings of village and farming life; and the development of Puebloan and "Mound-building" cultures.

Architecture

ARCH 4308. HISTORY OF URBAN FORM (3-0) 3 hours credit. The history of cities as physical form, influenced by political, economic, and social forces.

Art History

ART 3320. ART OF THE ANCIENT AMERICAS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Art and architecture of the Olmecs, Maya, Aztecs, Inca, Anasazi and other selected cultures of Mexico, Central America, South America and North America. Prerequisite: ART 1309 and 1310.

English

ENGL 3300. SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3-0) 3 hours credit. May include topics on Utopian literature, the American short story, Southwestern American literature, and modern British fiction. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 3344. AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Offers an introduction to American Indian literatures or focuses on a particular genre, period or topic.

ENGL 3346. MEXICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Offers an introduction to Mexican American literature or focuses on a particular genre, period or topic.

ENGL 3375. CREATIVE WRITING (3-0) 3 hours credit. Introduction to creative writing in formats that may include workshop, lecture, and individual conference. Students will write in two or three genres, including poetry, prose fiction, and other forms.

ENGL 4336. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Important themes, movements, regions, genres, or cross-cultural relationships. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.

Geography

GEOG 3371. IMAGES OF THE SOUTHWEST (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines the changing culture, architecture, and landscapes of the American Southwest as depicted in literature, art, film, television, and advertising, including the role of popular culture and commerce in creating and marketing a regional "Southwestern style." Also listed as HIST 3371; credit will be granted only once.

GEOG 4301. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY AND CARTOGRAPHY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Cultural and historical geography with an emphasis on cartography and the use of maps in research and teaching. Also listed as HIST 4301; credit will be granted only once.

GEOG 4310. GEOGRAPHY OF THE GREATER SOUTHWEST (3-0) 3 hours credit. Geography of the Greater Southwest to include Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, and Mexico. How the natural environment, cultural environment, and space itself have affected the history and development of the Southwest.

GEOG 4350. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN GEOGRAPHY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Selected topics in an identified area of geography. The course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: approval of instructor.

GEOG 4191, 4291, 4391. CONFERENCE COURSE (Variable credit from 1 to 3 semester hours as arranged). Topics assigned on an individual basis covering personal research or study in the designated areas. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

History

HIST 3351. HISTORY OF THE DALLAS-FORT WORTH METROPLEX (3-0) 3 hours credit. The growth and development of Dallas and Fort Worth from competitive 19th-century trade centers in a rural setting to cooperative high-tech cities in a rapidly urbanizing metroplex. Political, economic, cultural, and spatial changes of this area are explored within a national urban context.

HIST 3352. THE SOUTHWEST (3-0) 3 hours credit. A multicultural history of the southwestern United States from pre-Columbian times to the present. Cultural adaptation to environment; cultural contact and conflict; political, social, and economic change. Also listed as MAS 3352; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3357. THE EARLY FRONTIER (3-0) 3 hours credit. The clash of empires and the patterns of exploration and settlement from the Atlantic Coast to the Mississippi River. Indian-white relations and the development of cultural, social, and political life on the early frontier.

HIST 3358. THE LATER FRONTIER (3-0) 3 hours credit. American settlement west of the Mississippi River through the close of the frontier. Exploration, the fur trade, mining, the cattle industry, Indian relations, and the role of the West in U.S. foreign affairs.

HIST 3363. TEXAS TO 1850 (3-0) 3 hours credit. Multicultural heritage of Texas from pre-Colombian period to early statehood. Cultural contact; social, economic, and political change. Completion of either HIST 3363 or 3364 is recommended for those planning to teach in Texas schools. Also listed as MAS 3363; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3364. TEXAS SINCE 1845 (3-0) 3 hours credit. Texas in the Mexican-American and Civil Wars. Political events and ethnic relations since annexation. Rise of cotton, cattle, and oil industries. Literature and music in the 20th century. Completion of either HIST 3363 or 3364 is recommended for those planning to teach history in Texas secondary schools.

HIST 3367. AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY (3-0) 3 hours credit. Representative Indian tribes within the continental limits of the United States from pre-history to the contemporary period. Special topics: tribal cultures, the impact of European contact, and the colonial and United States Indian policies.

HIST 3368. THE HISTORY OF THE MEXICAN AMERICAN (3-0) 3 hours credit. The role of the Mexican American in the cultural and historical development of the United States with special emphasis on the Southwest. Also listed as MAS 3368; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 3370. THE IMAGE OF THE AMERICAN WEST (3-0) 3 hours credit. The way the American West has been portrayed and the part the Western myth has played in a search for a national identity. First impressions of the new world; the West in colonial literature; fiction in the 19th and 20th centuries; art, music and film; Western themes in politics; recent variations of the Western myth; the way such developments have reflected changes in popular values and a sense of national purpose.

HIST 3371. IMAGES OF THE SOUTHWEST (3-0) 3 hours credit. Examines the changing culture, architecture, and landscapes of the American Southwest as depicted in literature, art, film, television, and advertising, including the role of popular culture and commerce in creating and marketing a regional "Southwestern style." Also listed as GEOG 3371; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 4365. HISTORY OF SPAIN AND PORTUGAL (3-0) 3 hours credit. The cultural, political and economic history of the Iberian peninsula from ancient times. The medieval epoch; the Catholic Church; the overseas empires of Spain and Portugal, and their artistic achievements. The monarchist ideal, as well as political ideologies such as liberalism, Marxism, anarchism, and fascism.

HIST 4366. LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: ORIGINS THROUGH INDEPENDENCE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Latin America during the colonial period of Spanish and Portuguese rule. Pre-European civilizations; Iberian backgrounds; conquest of indigenous peoples; development of colonial institutions, economic patterns, social structures, and race relations; independence from Europe.

HIST 4367. LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST-INDEPENDENCE TO THE PRESENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. The evolution of six Latin American nations during the 19th and 20th centuries. The social, economic, and political development of three social groups in three regions: the Europeanized southern cone area of Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay; the indigenous culture of the Andean mountains in Peru; the African background of Brazil and Cuba.

HIST 4368. HISTORY OF MEXICO (3-0) 3 hours credit. Mexican history from its pre-Colonial indigenous foundation to the current situation. A social and economic analysis of the major events in Mexican history with emphasis upon the 19th and 20th centuries. The major theme in this class is the growth of Mexican nationalism and its relation to region, religion and ethnicity. Also listed as MAS 4368.

Spanish

SPAN 3312. SPANISH-AMERICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION (3-0) 3 hours credit. The evolution of Spanish-American society and culture as a background for its contemporary problems. Prerequisite: SPAN 2314 with a grade of C or better, or a knowledge of the language and consent of the department. Also listed as MAS 3312; credit will be granted only once.

SPAN 3320. INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE AND CULTURE I (3-0) 3 hours credit. Representative literary texts and relevant cultural information and material. Provide an understanding of epochs and currents from the Middle Ages through the Age of Reason. Comparison and contrast of selected texts from Spain and Spanish America with the principal objective of developing students’ understanding of historical change and cultural crosscurrents. Prerequisite: SPAN 3318 or consent of the department.

SPAN 3321. INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE AND CULTURE II (3-0) 3 hours credit. Representative literary texts and relevant cultural information and material. Provide an understanding of epochs and currents from Romanticism to the present day. Comparison and contrast of selected texts from Spain and Spanish America with the principal objective of developing students’ understanding of historical change and cultural crosscurrents. Prerequisite: SPAN 3318 or consent of the department.

SPAN 4313. TOPICS IN HISPANIC CULTURE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Among the topics are Spanish music, television, radio, film, and literature as culture. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Also listed as MAS 4313; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: two 3000-level courses in Spanish

SPAN 4314. TOPICS IN SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE TO MODERNISM (3-0) 3 hours credit. Topics may include: Colonial Spanish-American literature and culture, premodern Spanish-American literature and culture, Spanish-American literature and culture of the Enlightenment, or any particular movement, genre, work or author prior to Modernism. May be repeated for credit when content changes. Prerequisite: SPAN 3320 or 3321 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department.

SPAN 4315. TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE, MODERNISM TO THE PRESENT (3-0) 3 hours credit. Topics may include: Spanish-American literature and culture of Modernism, modern Spanish-American literature and culture, or any particular movement, genre, work or author from Modernism to the present. May be repeated for credit when content changes. Prerequisite: SPAN 3320 or 3321 with a grade of C or better or consent of the department. Also listed as MAS 4315; credit will be granted only once.

SPAN 4317. CHICANO LITERATURE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Mexican-American literature, with special attention to its social, cultural, and linguistic background. Also listed as MAS 4317; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: two 3000-level courses in Spanish

SPAN 4318. MEXICAN LITERATURE (3-0) 3 hours credit. Studies in Mexican fiction, poetry, drama, and literary essay. Also listed as MAS 4318; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: two 3000-level courses in Spanish.

Political Science

POLS 3316. DICTATORSHIP AND DEMOCRACY IN LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The political development of Latin American nations and various explanations for trends and differences in Latin American politics. Strategies of development; Latin America’s relationship with the United States; and contemporary events in Latin America.

POLS 3317. MEXICAN POLITICS AND U.S.-MEXICO RELATIONS (3-0) 3 hours credit. Current economic and political systems of Mexico and relevant issues in U.S.-Mexico relations. Trade, immigration, economic dependency, energy, contraband, and other topics. Also listed as MAS 3317; credit will be given in only one department.

POLS 4319. POLITICS OF MEXICAN AMERICANS (3-0) 3 hours credit. The influence of Mexican-American politics on United States government and policies with special attention given to organizational development, participation in political parties, leadership, ideology, the Chicano Movement, current issues, and relations with other ethnic groups. Also listed as MAS 4319; credit will be given in only one department.

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