The University of Texas at Arlington

Undergraduate Catalog 2008-2009

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Volume XCII – July 2008
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email: ugcatalog@uta.edu

UT Arlington Undergraduate Catalog Fall 2008
The College of Engineering

Dean: Bill D. Carroll, Ph.D., P.E. 634 Nedderman Hall • Box 19019 • 817-272-2571 • www.uta.edu/engineering
Bioengineering, Civil, Computer Science, Electrical, Industrial & Manufacturing Systems, Materials Science, Mechanical and Aerospace

Engineering is the profession in which a knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences gained by study, experience and practice is applied with judgment to develop ways to economically utilize information, materials and forces of nature for the benefit of humanity. Engineering is a rewarding and satisfying career for those men and women with the talent and determination to meet the challenges of rapidly changing technologies and complex societal problems in urgent need of solutions.

The College of Engineering provides the opportunity for study in a wide variety of engineering disciplines under the guidance of an excellent faculty. Baccalaureate degree programs are offered in aerospace engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, and software engineering. The programs in aerospace engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, and software engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone (410) 347-7700. The program in computer science is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET. ABET, Inc., was formerly known as the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Graduate degrees are offered in each of these disciplines and in other areas of specialization: biomedical engineering and materials science. (All of these graduate programs offer both master's and doctoral degrees except software engineering, engineering management, logistics, and systems engineering, which offer a master's degree only.) A combined BS (Biology)/MS (Biomedical Engineering) degree is available for students interested in tissue engineering and biotechnology; see the Other Engineering Subject Areas section and the Biology section of the Undergraduate Catalog and the Biomedical Engineering section of the UT Arlington Graduate Catalog for details.

Preparation in High School for Admission to the College of Engineering

For students intending to pursue a major in engineering, the recommended curriculum is defined by the "Recommended Texas High School Program Graduation Requirements" approved by the State Board of Education beginning with School Year 2004-2005. This listing below reflects the current State Board recommendation and expands upon the University requirements stated earlier in this catalog:

English 4 units
Mathematics 4 units
Algebra I, II 2 units
Geometry 1 unit
Additional Advanced Mathematics* 1 unit
Science 4 units
Chemistry 1 unit
Physics 1 unit
Other Science Courses 2 units
Computer Science** 1 unit
Single Foreign Language*** 2 units
Social Science 4 units
U.S. History 1 unit
World History Studies 1 unit
World Geography 1 unit
U.S. Government 1/2 unit
Economics 1/2 unit
Other Courses 5 units
TOTAL 24 units

*For the College of Engineering, this must explicitly include trigonometry.

**Most desirable syllabus would include computer programming in C, C++ or Java, and instruction in computer applications including word processing, spreadsheets, and database management.

***For the College of Engineering, two levels of the same language are required.

In addition to the above, an additional year of advanced mathematics such as calculus is strongly recommended. Further, students planning careers in the health professions or biomedical engineering should take one year of biology. In all areas, students are urged to take advantage of advanced placement opportunities and honors programs. A student who enrolls without having completed the above courses will not be optimally prepared, and the duration of the student's undergraduate program will likely be extended. In particular, the engineering programs offered by the college are based upon a student being fully prepared to begin study with the following courses:

MATH 1426 Calculus I

PHYS 1443 General Technical Physics

Prerequisites for the above courses are considered deficiencies and are not counted toward an engineering degree.

Admission to the College of Engineering

Admission to the College of Engineering is based on the University's undergraduate admission requirements plus the following additional admission criteria for the College of Engineering. Students may be admitted to the College of Engineering in two ways: directly into a major or into a pre-major. A student is admitted directly into a major only if all admission criteria are met.

Students Entering Directly from High School

Students entering directly from high school will be evaluated on the basis of the following admission criteria:

As noted, students who meet these criteria are admitted directly into a major and those that do not meet all of these criteria are reviewed and considered on individual merits for admission into a pre-major.

Students Entering with Transfer Credit

Transfer students include those from other units within UT Arlington as well as those from other educational institutions. Transfer students from outside UT Arlington must furnish an official transcript (or copy) to the Dean of Engineering and/or department to which they are applying to permit an evaluation of all college level work completed. Transfer students with less than 24 hours of transferable credit are admitted under the criteria for students entering directly from high school.

Transfer students with 24 hours or more of transferable credit must meet the following requirements:

As noted, students who meet these criteria are admitted directly into a major and those that do not meet all of these criteria are reviewed and considered on individual merits for admission into a pre-major.

Placement in an Engineering Major

Students meeting all admission criteria for entry directly from high school or for entry with transfer credit will be admitted as a program major: AE (Aerospace Engineering), CE (Civil Engineering), CpE (Computer Engineering), EE (Electrical Engineering), IE (Industrial Engineering), ME (Mechanical Engineering), CS (Computer Science) or SE (Software Engineering). A student who intends to major in the College of Engineering but is unsure of which major may be admitted as Engineering Undecided. Students admitted as an intended major can apply to their department for advancement into the major when conditions specified by the department are met.

Major Meet All Criteria Do NOT Meet All Criteria
Aerospace Engineering AE AE intended
Civil Engineering CE CE intended
Computer Engineering CpE CpE intended
Electrical Engineering EE EE intended
Industrial Engineering IE IE intended
Mechanical Engineering ME ME intended
Computer Science CS CS intended
Software Engineering SE SE intended

Or Engineering Undecided

Admission into the Professional Program

Students who have successfully completed the initial program of studies may apply to their department for advancement to the professional program. Prior to admission to the professional program, students are required to demonstrate their intellectual talent, work habits, and professional ethics to warrant acceptance for study toward an engineering or computer science degree.

Hereafter, the term "pre-professional courses" is used for courses required in the first two years of the degree program as specified by the department, and the term "professional courses" is used for courses required in the third and fourth years of the degree program. The professional program includes students who have been accepted by an engineering department into the professional program course sequence. An official degree plan is filed upon acceptance into this category. For advancement to a department's professional program, students must meet the following requirements:

1. Academic performance: Students must have completed all pre-professional courses with a grade of C or better, complied with the Three-Attempt Rule, and achieved a minimum three-calculation GPA as specified by the department. Refer to the College of Engineering Academic Regulations and individual department program descriptions for specific requirements in the desired program.

2. Limitations on Enrollment: The University and the College of Engineering reserve the right to limit enrollment in any program, based on the availability of facilities and staff. To achieve such limitations, grade point averages and other measures of student potential beyond the minimum stated above may be applied.

Competence in Oral Communication and Computer Use

Students in engineering satisfy the oral communication requirement by successfully completing COMS 3302, Professional and Technical Communication. The various programs in the College of Engineering have different requirements for demonstrating computer literacy. Students should consult their particular degree program for details.

College of Engineering Academic Regulations

All students pursuing a degree in one of the College's academic programs must abide by the academic regulations of the University and the following additional rules established by the College of Engineering:

Regulations regarding work at other institutions

1. Enrollment in Other Institution(s): To ensure adequate coverage of needed material, once enrolled at UT Arlington as an engineering major, a student must obtain written permission from the department before enrolling in courses intended to be transferred to UT Arlington for credit toward a UT Arlington engineering degree.

2. Transfer Courses: Only equivalent courses in a program accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) or those freshman and sophomore courses accepted by the College of Engineering or the student's major department can be counted toward an engineering degree.

3. Validation of Transfer Credit: Transfer credit that constitutes a part of a continuing course sequence in the same area will be validated only upon satisfactory completion of the succeeding course in the sequence at UT Arlington. Students whose performance in the subsequent courses at UT Arlington is poor may be required to repeat courses taken elsewhere.

Regulations regarding work at UT Arlington

4. Academic Honesty: The College of Engineering takes academic honesty and ethical behavior very seriously. Engineers are entrusted with the safety, health, and well being of the public. Students found guilty of academic dishonesty will be punished to the full extent permitted by the rules and regulations of UT Arlington.

5. C-Grade Rule: A grade of D or lower in a pre-professional course indicates unsatisfactory preparation for further engineering education. Any such course in which a D or lower is received must by repeated before enrolling in any course for which it is a prerequisite. This requirement is subject to the Three-Attempt Rule. A student unable to raise his or her grade to at least a C in a pre-professional course within three enrollments (attempts) shall be required to change his or her major to a field outside of the College of Engineering.

6. English as a Foreign Language: Courses in English as a foreign language will not substitute for either ENGL 1301 or 1302.

7. Foreign Language Deficiency Removal: Students admitted to the College of Engineering with a deficiency in foreign language must remove that deficiency prior to graduation by taking two courses in a single modern or classical language totaling not less than six semester hours credit (eight semester hours are required in the current UT Arlington introductory modern and classical languages sequence).

8. Academic Load: A student may not enroll in more than the University's maximum permitted academic load without receiving the permission of the student's department and the Dean of Engineering. The College of Engineering considers 12 semester hours in the fall and spring terms and nine semester hours in the 11-week summer term to be a minimum "full load" for undergraduates.

9. Three-Attempt Rule: A student may not attempt a course (at UT Arlington and/or at any other institution) more than three times and apply that course toward an engineering degree. Enrollment in a course for a period of time sufficient for assignment of a grade, including a grade of W, is considered an attempt.

Regulations regarding academic standing

10. Three-Calculation GPA: The College of Engineering uses three GPA calculations to evaluate students for admission and continuation. These calculations employ only the grades received in courses that are applicable to the engineering degree being sought. Any references in this catalog to the three-calculation GPA requirement mean that the student's GPA must meet or exceed the requirement in each of the following three categories:

11. Satisfactory Academic Standing: An engineering student is in satisfactory academic standing if the student is not on University or College of Engineering probation. The UT Arlington university-wide probation system is described earlier in the catalog. The college probation system is described below.

12. College of Engineering Probation: Students in an engineering major or pre-major will be placed on College of Engineering probation if any of the three parts of their three-calculation GPA falls below 2.0. A student's academic standing is determined as soon as grades are reported by the Registrar at the end of each period in which the student has completed 12 or more semester-hours of courses (to accommodate part-time students, this period may extend to more than a single semester or summer term).

13. College of Engineering Academic Suspension: A student whose three-calculation GPA remains less than 2.0 for three consecutive periods in which 12 or more semester-hours are completed shall be suspended from the College of Engineering for a minimum period of one calendar year. No engineering courses may be taken at UT Arlington, or taken elsewhere for transfer to UT Arlington for credit toward an engineering degree, during any period of suspension from the College. At the end of that period, a student may petition the Dean of Engineering for readmission to the College.

14. Advancement Under Probation: No student who is on College of Engineering or University probation shall be advanced to professional program status.

Fees

In addition to fees applicable to the entire University, each engineering course carries a "designated tuition" charge (authorized by the Board of Regents per statute 54.0513) detailed under Description of Tuition and Fees.

Advising

All new and continuing students whose major is Engineering Undecided will be advised in the Office of the Dean of Engineering prior to registration. Those attending orientations in summer will be advised at that time. Students not attending an orientation, or students entering UT Arlington in the spring and summer semesters, should make appointments for such advising through the Office of the Dean of Engineering.

All students, when reporting for advising, must have a transcript (original or copy) of high school course work, a transcript (original or copy) of any college transfer credit applicable to an engineering degree, and a copy of SAT scores or other scores that have been used as a basis for admission. New students will not be able to register for classes without first being counseled and obtaining an approval to register.

Continuing students in all engineering majors or pre-majors must receive advising by their major departments before registering, if required by the department. One period in October and another in March are designated for engineering counseling. Students must be cleared (showing that they have been counseled) before proceeding with registration.

The advising goal for students who have not yet attained professional program status is to strengthen their academic background sufficiently so that they are able to subsequently complete courses in their engineering degree plans. To this end, a student's advisor may require him or her to enroll in fewer courses than specified by the University and may require him or her to take courses for which credit has already been received. See individual department program descriptions for requirements.

The College of Engineering's Counseling and Advising Center, located in 242 Nedderman Hall, houses the Co-op program and coordinates tutoring, assessment, and academic advising, to engineering students.

Minors in the College of Engineering

Requirements for a Minor in Aerospace Engineering

To receive a minor in Aerospace Engineering, a student must complete the following courses:

MAE 2301 Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

MAE 2312 Solid Mechanics

MAE 3302 Aerodynamics of Incompressible Flows

MAE 3304 Astronautics I

MAE 3405 Flight Dynamics

MAE 3315 Aerospace Structural Statics

Requirements for a Minor in Computer Science

To receive a minor in Computer Science, a student must not be receiving his/her major degree from the Computer Science Department and must complete all courses listed with a grade of C or better in each course. Any substitutions must be approved in advance by the department chairperson.

To receive a minor in Computer Science, a student must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better in each:

CSE 1320 Intermediate Programming
CSE 1325 Object-Oriented and Event-Driven Programming
CSE 2315 Discrete Structures
CSE 2320 Algorithms and Data Structures
and any two 3000 or 4000 level courses with a grade of C or better in each, as well as all required prerequisites for the chosen courses.

Requirements for a Minor in Computer Applications

To receive a minor in Computer Applications, a student who is not in a College of Engineering major must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better in each:

CSE 1310 Introduction to Computers and Programming
CSE 1320 Intermediate Programming
CSE 1325 Object-Oriented and Event-Driven Programming
CSE 2321 Data Structures for Non-Engineers
CSE 3310 Software Engineering
CSE 3330 Database Systems and File Structures

Requirements for a Minor in Electrical Engineering

To receive a minor in Electrical Engineering, a student must complete the following four courses with a grade of C or better in each:

EE 2315 Circuit Analysis I
EE 2446 Circuit Analysis II (with lab)
EE 2303 Electronics I
EE 2307 Electromagnetics
and must complete two courses with a grade of C or better in each selected from among the following four:
EE 3444 Electronics II (with lab)
EE 3302 Power Systems Fundamentals
EE 3317 Linear SystemsEE 3341 Digital Circuit Design (with lab)
as well as all required prerequisites for the two chosen courses.

Requirements for a Minor in Industrial Engineering

To receive a minor in Industrial Engineering, a student must complete the following courses with a grade of C or better in each:

IE 3301, IE 3312, IE 3315, plus any three upper division IE courses for which the prerequisites are satisfied.

Requirements for a Minor in Mechanical Engineering

To receive a minor in Mechanical Engineering, a student must complete 18 semester credit hours in mechanical engineering courses 3000 level or above.

Requirements for a Minor in Materials Science and Engineering

To receive a minor in Materials Science and Engineering, a student must complete 18 hours of the following courses with a grade of C or better in each course. Courses must be approved in advance by the MSE undergraduate program advisor. A student must complete:

MSE 3300 Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering (MAE 2321 for MAE majors)
MSE 3321 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MAE 3321 for MAE majors)
MSE 4320 Nanoscale Materials, and three of the following courses for which the prerequisites are satisfied.
MSE 4310 Polymer Material Science
MSE 4315 Introduction to Composites (MAE 4315 for MAE majors)
MSE 4336 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MAE 4336 for MAE majors)
MSE 4337 Fatigue of Engineering Materials (MAE 4390 for MAE majors)
MSE 4338 Failure Analysis (MAE 4338 for MAE majors)
MSE 4339 Fracture Mechanics (MAE 4339 for MAE majors)
MSE 4390 Special Topics in Materials Science (e.g., electrical, optical and magnetic properties of materials)
CHEM 3307 Introduction to Polymer Chemistry
CHEM 3315 Introduction to Biophysical Chemistry
CHEM 3321 Physical Chemistry
CHEM 4303 Quantum Chemistry
CHEM 4318 Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 4346 Advanced Synthetic Methods
MAE 3344 Introduction to Manufacturing Engineering
PHYS 3313 Introduction to Modern Physics
PHYS 3455 Electronics
PHYS 4324 Advanced Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 4325 Solid State Physics
PHYS 4326 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

No Minors have been approved for Civil Engineering.

Honors Degrees in Engineering

College of Engineering students who wish to graduate with an Honors Degree in Engineering must be members of the Honors College in good standing. They must complete the major degree requirements and the requirements of the Honors College, which include at least 24 hours of Honors course work while maintaining an overall GPA of 3.0 or greater. Honors Degree requirements are compatible with all departmental and college requirements, but specific requirements vary with each engineering department's program. It is particularly important that students pursuing an Honors Degree in Engineering consult carefully with an advisor in the College of Engineering and also in the Honors College before each registration to be sure all requirements are met.

Fast Track Master's Degrees in Engineering

The Fast Track Program enables outstanding UT Arlington senior undergraduate students in several disciplines to satisfy degree requirements leading to a master's degree in that discipline while completing their undergraduate studies. When senior-level students are within 15 hours of completing their undergraduate degree requirements, they may take up to nine hours of graduate level coursework designated by the program to satisfy both undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. Interested UT Arlington undergraduate students should discuss this option with their advisors. Information is provided in the department section of this catalog, with details available in departmental offices.

At this time, there are Fast Track programs in the following undergraduate programs:
Aerospace Engineering leading to a Master's Degree in Aerospace Engineering
Computer Engineering leading to a Master's Degree in Computer Engineering
Industrial Engineering leading to a Master's Degree in Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering leading to a Master's Degree in Mechanical Engineering
Physics leading to a Master's Degree in Materials Science and Engineering

Professional Engineering Licensure

The protection of the public welfare requires that those who practice engineering do so ethically and competently. Professional licensure requires an individual to meet examination and practice requirements defined by the laws of the state or states in which he or she intends to practice.

The first step toward licensure as a Professional Engineer (P.E.) is to pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination. Graduating seniors are permitted to take the FE examination during their final year. The FE examination is offered by the Texas Board of Professional Engineers in both the fall and spring semesters. Since this examination is over topics common to all engineering degree programs, students are strongly urged to avail themselves of this opportunity at a time when their academic preparation is at a peak.

Pre-med and Pre-law Studies

Students graduating with degrees in engineering occasionally choose to go on to medical schools or law schools. Those students are advised to consult early with the pre-med or pre-law advisors at UT Arlington so that additional requirements can be taken in a timely way. For example, a minimum set of additional courses for an engineer planning to apply to medical school consists of 4 chemistry courses (2 in general chemistry, 2 in organic chemistry), and 4 biology courses (2 in general biology plus genetics and animal physiology).

Cooperative Education

The Cooperative Education Program (Co-op Program) at UT Arlington is a partnership between the University and various organizations of businesses, government, and industries that provides students with an opportunity to obtain experience in their chosen engineering discipline by alternating periods of formal study with periods of work or through a parallel program which allows students to work part time while taking courses at UT Arlington. This program enhances a student's education through work-related experiences and by association with participating professional engineers, and provides a competitive salary when working, as well.

Students who successfully complete the Co-op Program will receive cooperative education certificates and have this accomplishment entered on their transcripts. Co-op Program students are expected to register each work term in an engineering course (ENGR 2100, 3100, 4100, 3000) specified by the Director of the Co-op Program. The College of Engineering provides assistance in placing students with companies that are related to their specific needs and program of study.

Information on prerequisites for application and requirements for acceptance are available in the Cooperative Education Office, 242 Nedderman Hall, and on the College of Engineering Web site.

Engineering (ENGR)
The following courses are administered through the Office of the Dean of Engineering.

(3000. SUPERVISED ENGINEERING WORK EXPERIENCE is a non-tuition bearing course.)

2100, 3100, 4100. SUPERVISED ENGINEERING WORK EXPERIENCE. 1 hour credit. Course is for cooperative education students in engineering to be taken in the semester or summer they are employed. Students will prepare a technical report based upon their work experience. Students who complete the cooperative program will receive certificates and this will be entered on their transcript. Prerequisite: acceptance into and continuance in the Engineering Cooperative Education Program. May be repeated.

4191. AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT-I. 1 hour credit.
ENGR 4191 (AVSD1) is the first course in a two-semester introduction to autonomous vehicle systems (AVS). AVSD1 is broad, conceptual, & theoretical. AVSD2 (worth 2 credits) is focused, practical, & applied. Introduces AVS (Autonomous Vehicles Systems), their history, missions, capabilities, operation. Introduces UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), UGVs (ground), USVs (surface water), & UUVs (underwater); levels of autonomy; coordiate systems & equations of motion; coordinate systems & transformations for payloads; sensors & operator interfaces; estimation of vehicle weight, power, & performance; manual remote control technologies & operations; embedded computer system design; & electromagnetic interference (EMI). Provides an environment for designing an autonomous vehicle system for a defined mission such that the developed autonomous systems can be used in national and international competitions. This course is team-taught by faculty in the CSE, MAE, and IE departments. Prerequisite: junior standing and admission to a professional engineering program.

4291. AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT-II. 2 hours credit.
ENGR 4291 (AVSD2) is the second course in a two-semester introduction to autonomous vehicle systems (AVS). AVSD1 is broad, conceptual, & theoretical. AVSD2 (worth 2 credits) is focused, practical, & applied. Prerequisite/corequisite: ENGR 4191.