The University of Texas at Arlington

Undergraduate Catalog 2008-2009

Table of Contents
About the Catalog

Undergraduate Admissions
Choose Your Major
Course Descriptions
Class Schedules

Volume XCII – July 2008
Previous Editions
email: ugcatalog@uta.edu

UT Arlington Undergraduate Catalog Fall 2008
The Department of Sociology and Anthropology

430 University Hall • Box 19599 • 817-272-2661 • www.uta.edu/sociology-anthropology
Degree Requirements - Faculty - Course Descriptions

The principal common educational objective in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology is to develop a systematic understanding of social behavior, human culture, and social institutions. Knowledge of human social and cultural relationships is vital to a meaningful perspective on and understanding of the society in which we live. Contemporary societies are characterized by diversity, rapid change, complex organization, and extensive specialization. Programs of study in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology pursue the challenge of (1) creating and disseminating general knowledge that will render this world more understandable and (2) providing an educational base for more effective and humane planning and social intervention in society. Each of the programs of study relates to this general objective in a somewhat different manner. Students are encouraged to visit with the faculty and learn more about the programs offered in the department.

Sociology

A program of study in sociology has three principal objectives: (1) to foster the ability to analyze human relationships from a sociological perspective, (2) to develop the theoretical, methodological, and statistical skills necessary for asking and answering sociological questions, and (3) to enhance individuals' awareness of the relationship between events in their own lives and the structure of the society in which they live. The program is designed to prepare students both to pursue graduate work in sociology and to seek a career in a variety of private and public settings where knowledge of human relationships and/or social research skills is particularly useful. Students seeking certification to teach in the public schools can use sociology as a teaching area.

Anthropology

A program of study in anthropology has the objective of grounding students in three main subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology (the comparative analysis of human lifeways around the world), archaeology (the systematic analysis of the material remains of past cultures), and physical anthropology (the study of humans as a biological species). The program prepares students both for graduate work in anthropology and for many careers in which anthropological perspectives and training are useful.

Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology

English

Six hours of composition.

Literature

Three hours of English or modern and classical languages literature or other approved substitute.

Liberal Arts Elective

Three hours above the freshman level of literature, or social and cultural studies designated as taught in the College of Liberal Arts, or fine arts or philosophy, or technical writing.

Modern and Classical Languages

1441, 1442, and six hours at the 2000 level or above.

Political Science

2311 and 2312.

History

1311 and 1312.

Mathematics

Six hours (level of college algebra or higher).

Science

Eight hours in a single lab science (biology, chemistry, geology or physics).

Fine Arts

Three hours from architecture, art, dance, music or theatre arts.

Social/Cultural Studies

Three hours from designated courses which have been approved by the Undergraduate Assembly. For a list of approved courses, students should contact their academic advisor.

Electives

Sufficient to give the total number of hours required for the degree.

Major

37 hours including 1311, 3352, 3372 and 3462; and one course (three hours) in anthropology.

Total

120 hours, at least 36 of which must be 3000/4000 level.

Optional Minor

Students majoring in sociology may pursue a minor in another field of study by filing a statement of intent with the Program Director. Requires 18 hours, of which at least six must be at 3000/4000 level.

Optional Specializations in Sociology

Students majoring in sociology may pursue a general course of study in the discipline or declare a specific area of concentration by filing a statement of intent with the Sociology Department. The purpose of specialization is to provide the student with a focused, systematic, and in-depth educational experience in the context of a broad liberal arts education. Each area requires a minimum of 12 semester hours. Additional requirements may apply. See advisor for details.

The areas of specialization are:

Requirement for a Minor in Sociology

A minor in sociology requires 18 semester hours, at least six of which must be 3000/4000 level.

Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Anthropology

English

Six hours of composition.

Literature

Three hours of English or modern and classical languages literature or other approved substitute.

Liberal Arts Elective

Three hours above the freshman level of literature, or social and cultural studies designated as taught in the College of Liberal Arts, or fine arts or philosophy, or technical writing.

Modern and Classical Languages

1441, 1442, and six hours at the 2000 level or above.

Political Science

2311, 2312.

History

1311, 1312.

Mathematics

Six hours (level of college algebra or higher).

Science

Eight hours in a single lab science (biology, chemistry, geology or physics).

Linguistics

Three hours.

Fine Arts

Three hours from architecture, art, dance, music or theatre arts.

Philosophy

1301 or 2311.

Social/Cultural Studies

Three hours from designated courses which have been approved by the Undergraduate Assembly. For a list of approved courses, students should contact their academic advisor.

Electives

Sufficient to give the total number of hours required for the degree.

Major

38 hours, including ANTH 2307, ANTH 2322, ANTH 2339, SOCI 3352 and a minimum of one 3000/4000 level course in each of archaeology, biological, and cultural anthropology as approved by advisor.

Minor

18 hours, of which six must be 3000/4000 level.

Total

120 hours, at least 36 of which must be 3000/4000 level.

Requirements for a Minor in Anthropology

The Anthropology minor (6 courses/18 hours total) can be fulfilled by successfully completing two of the following three courses:

Plus any other four ANTH courses, at least two of which must be at the advanced level (3000 or above). Questions about the Anthropology minor may be directed to the coordinator for undergraduate advising in Anthropology, Prof. Karl Petruso.

Oral Communication and Computer Competencies

Students majoring in sociology or anthropology are required to demonstrate computer use and oral communication competencies. Computer use proficiency can be demonstrated through successful completion of (a) CSE 1301 or INSY 2303; (b) ANTH 3341 or SOCI 3355; (c) other courses approved by the Undergraduate Assembly; or (d) the University computer use competency examination. Oral communication proficiency can be demonstrated through the successful completion of (a) COMS 1301, 2305, or 3302; (b) ANTH 3341 or SOCI 3355, or other designated, approved courses in Anthropology and Sociology; or© other courses approved by the Undergraduate Assembly. Students should discuss these options with their undergraduate advisor, who may also provide a list of other courses approved by the University to meet these requirements.

Sociology and Anthropology Faculty

Chair

Professor Young

Professors

Agger, Bastien, Eve, Petruso, Shelton, Smith, Weed

Associate Professors

Dunn, Rouse

Assistant Professors

Baird, Brown, Jacobson, Khanduri, Kunovich, Zlolniski


View Course Descriptions for: Sociology (SOCI), Anthropology (ANTH)