The University of Texas at Arlington

Undergraduate Catalog 2008-2009

Table of Contents
About the Catalog

Undergraduate Admissions
Choose Your Major
Course Descriptions
Class Schedules

Volume XCII – July 2008
Previous Editions
email: ugcatalog@uta.edu

UT Arlington Undergraduate Catalog Fall 2008
Academic Regulations

Student Responsibility

While University faculty and staff members give students academic advice and assistance, each graduate and undergraduate student is expected to take responsibility for his or her education and personal development. The student must know and abide by the academic and disciplinary policies given in this catalog, including rules governing quantity of work, the standard of work required to continue in the University, scholastic probation and dismissal, and enforced withdrawal. The student must also know and meet the requirements of his or her degree program, including the University’s core education requirements; must enroll in courses appropriate to the program; must meet prerequisites and take courses in the proper sequence to ensure orderly and timely progress; and must seek advice from appropriate University representatives about degree requirements and other University policies when necessary. The student must also know and adhere to all University deadlines.

Once a student registers for classes, the University commits resources to provide registered students with instruction by qualified faculty and sufficient class space for the course. Thus, upon registration, a student assumes full responsibility for either paying fees in full by a prescribed due date, or notifying the University in an appropriate time frame that he/she will not attend and take all appropriate action as prescribed to drop a course(s) and/or officially withdraw from the University.

A student’s registration is not automatically cancelled for non-attendance. A student should either pay fees in full by the designated deadline or take the appropriate steps to withdraw. To avoid financial responsibility to the University, this cancellation of enrollment must be completed as soon as possible, but no later than the day before the first official University class day. Prompt notification also helps to free up class space for other students who are interested in the same classes.

Courses in the Schedule of Classes are subject to change. Although unusual, a section may be cancelled due to low enrollment or staffing considerations. The department that cancels the class should notify any students already enrolled and assist with alternate arrangements. At the beginning of the semester, students should always check for changes regarding class meeting times or classroom locations.

The student must verify his or her schedule of classes each semester, must see that necessary corrections are made, and must keep documentation of all schedule changes and other transactions.

E-mail is a prime means for communication. Therefore, the University has the right to send communications to students via e-mail and the right to expect that those communications will be received and read in a timely fashion. The Office of Information Technology (OIT) will assign all students an official University e-mail address. It is to this official address that the University will send e-mail communications. Students are expected to check their official e-mail account on a frequent and consistent basis to stay current with University communications. The University recommends checking e-mail daily; in recognition that certain communications may be time-critical.

The student must give current and correct local and permanent addresses and telephone numbers to the Office of Admissions, Records and Registration and must notify this office immediately of any changes. Official correspondence may be mailed, versus e-mailed, to the appropriate address depending upon the nature of the correspondence and the academic calendar; if the student has moved and failed to correct this address, he or she will not be relieved of responsibility on the grounds that the correspondence was not delivered.

All students should be familiar with the following sources of information:

University Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. The catalogs give important information about academic policies and procedures that apply to all students. The official academic calendar, admission procedures and residence requirements, and policies on quantity of work, grades and the grade point average, credit by examination and correspondence course work, adding and dropping courses, withdrawal from the University, and scholastic probation and dismissal are all included in the catalog. These catalogs also give historical and current information about the University’s organization and physical facilities. The services of the Vice President for Student Affairs, the libraries and research facilities that support the University’s academic programs are also described in these catalogs.

The Undergraduate Catalog gives information about degrees offered by the undergraduate divisions and lists the faculty. The chapter for each college or school describes the academic policies and procedures that apply to students in that division and lists the division’s undergraduate degree programs and courses. The Graduate Catalog gives similar information about graduate programs. Catalogs are available online at www3.uta.edu/registrar .

The Course Schedule. The Schedule of Classes on the Web at MyMav is published by the Office of Admissions, Records and Registration and is available before registration for each semester, winter intersession, summer intersession, and summer session. It includes information about registration procedures; times, locations, instructors, prerequisites, and special fees of courses offered; and advising locations.

The University Directory. The University directory is published and distributed by Student Congress each fall. It gives addresses and telephone numbers of University offices and of students, faculty, and staff members.

Dean’s Offices. Students are responsible to the appropriate Dean of a College or School. Undeclared students are responsible to the Director of the University Advising Center. In each college/school, the office of the assistant or associate dean serves as a central source of information about academic affairs and student services.

Academic Advising. The responsibilities of the advisor at UT Arlington are to empower students to discover and attain their academic and life goals; to serve as an advocate for student success; to serve as an interface to university services; and to provide accurate information about academic requirements and standards in a timely and efficient manner.

The student is responsible for seeking academic advice, for enrolling in appropriate courses to insure progress toward a degree, for timely completion of his or her academic program, for familiarity with the appropriate Catalog, and for maintaining University standards. Assistance from an academic advisor is not a substitute for the personal responsibility of the student described above.

The student should consult the advising office in his or her department or, if he or she is undeclared, the University Advising Center for information not provided in the publications listed above. A student who is in doubt about any University regulation should always seek clarification before proceeding.

General

Any student who registers to attend classes at UT Arlington and is ineligible to attend for academic or disciplinary reasons will be dropped automatically from the rolls of the University.

Students are required to report promptly any change in their U.S. address to the Office of Admissions, Records and Registration or change it through MyMav.

Maximum Semester Load

Without permission from the appropriate academic dean, a student may not register in a fall or spring semester for more than 19 hours at UT Arlington or concurrently at UT Arlington and another institution. Any student who violates this regulation may be required to drop hours to comply with the 19-hour rule or may be denied transfer credit for those hours in excess of 19 taken at another institution.

A student who registers in the summer sessions for more than 14 hours without permission from the academic dean may be required to drop sufficient hours to comply with the 14-hour limit. The table below indicates the combinations of course work for which a student may enroll and stay within the maximum load of 14 hours.

Combination of Summer Semester Hours Permitted

Maximum each:

5-week session + 11-week session
7 + 0
6 + 2
5 + 4
4 + 6
3 + 8
2 + 10
1 + 12
0 + 14

A student may register for a maximum of three hours during the Winter Intersession and Summer Intersession intersession terms.

Class Attendance

Class attendance and lateness regulations will be established by instructors and announced to their classes. At the discretion of the instructor, such regulations may or may not include provisions for making up work missed by the student as a consequence of an absence. Students who are late to class are responsible for reporting their presence to the instructor after the class is dismissed.

University Authorized Absences

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs provides lists of students who have absences authorized by the University (e.g., participation in athletic events or scholastic activities that are officially sponsored University functions—these are primarily activities that are funded by the University). The student must contact the instructor one week in advance of the excused absence and arrange with the instructor to make up missed work or missed examinations. Instructors will provide those students an opportunity to make up the work or otherwise adjust the grading to ensure that the student is not penalized for the absence. Failure to notify the instructor or failure to comply with the arrangements to make up the work will void the excused absence.

If the student is called to active military duty or participates in active military service for a reasonably brief period, the student will be allowed to complete an assignment or exam within a reasonable time after the absence (Section 51.9111 Texas Education Code.) Students called to active duty for longer periods of time, should contact the Registrar’s Office.

Observance of Religious Holy Days

A student who must miss an examination, work assignment or other project because of an observance of a religious holy day will be given the opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence.

A religious holy day means a holy day observed by a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property taxation under Section 11.20 of the Tax Code. A student will be excused from attending classes or completing other required activities, including examinations for the observance of a religious holy day. The period of the excused absence will include time for any travel needed to fulfill that religious obligation. The student will be given the opportunity to complete the work missed, within a reasonable time period following the absence, provided the student has properly notified the instructor. The instructor must be notified in writing at least one week in advance of the absence and the student must arrange with the instructor to make up missed work or examinations. The instructor is under no obligation to accommodate students who are absent or miss work without prior notification and make-up arrangements. Students who have properly notified the instructor will not be penalized for the absence. However, the instructor may respond appropriately if the student fails to complete the assignment or examination satisfactorily within the time limit following the absence set by prior arrangement.

If the instructor and the student disagree about whether an absence constitutes a religious holy day as defined above, or if there is similar disagreement about whether the student has been given reasonable time to complete any missed assignments or examinations, either the student or the instructor may request a ruling from the Office of the Provost. The decision of the Provost is final.

75 Hours to Undergraduate Major Policy

Applies only to students who enter the University in Fall 2006 and thereafter

1. Undergraduate students must be admitted to a major before they accumulate 75 semester credit hours. An enrollment hold will be placed on students exceeding this limit who have not been admitted to a major. To have the enrollment hold removed, students who have not been admitted to a major by the time they have reached 75 hours must see an academic advisor in the University Advising Center. The decision to admit a student to a major resides with the academic department and the department may establish independent admission criteria, pre-requisites, and other admissions conditions. Students who have reached 60 hours and have not declared a major will be notified of this policy.

2. Students transferring to UT Arlington with 75 or more hours should be admitted directly into a major. The decision to admit a student to a major resides with the academic department and the department may establish independent admission criteria, pre-requisites, and other admission conditions. Students who are unable to be admitted to a major of their choosing must see an academic advisor in the University Advising Center for special permission to enroll.

Academic Probation and Dismissal

Academic probation and dismissal regulations apply to all undergraduate students except provisionally and conditionally admitted students until they have met the requirements for regular admission.

A student must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) at UT Arlington to remain academically eligible to register for the subsequent semester or summer session. The minimum average required varies with the total number of college credit hours attempted at UT Arlington and is shown in the Table of Academic Standards.

Students on academic probation may not take more than 14 semester hours without permission of their college/school dean, or if undeclared, the director of the University Advising Center. Academic advisors may further limit the number of hours and overall difficulty of the students’ schedules, require students to take specific courses deemed necessary to their education, prevent students from taking unsuitable courses, require students to attend advising sessions, and take other actions approved by the dean of their college/school or the director of the University Advising Center to assure the students’ attention to their academic deficiencies.

Students on academic probation cannot hold office in any club or organization, represent UT Arlington at any official or social event, or make any University trip without the permission of the appropriate dean or the University Advising Center.

Table of Academic Standards for Continuance

The cumulative University grade point average is calculated on the basis of all work undertaken at UT Arlington, including credit by examination, correspondence and extension, for which a letter grade is given. (The symbols X, W, P and Z are not considered in calculating the grade point average.) Grades earned at any institution other than UT Arlington are not used in calculating the University grade point average, but semester hours of transfer credit accepted by UT Arlington are added to hours taken at the University to determine the total college hours undertaken.

Table of Academic Standards

Total College Hours Undertaken UTA GPA for Academic Probation UTA GPA for Academic Dismissal
0-29 less than 2.00 less than 1.60
30-59 less than 2.00 less than 1.80
60 or more less than 2.00 less than 2.00

Probation and Dismissal

Rules governing academic probation and dismissal, as well as exceptions permitting continuance and special college regulations, are given below.

1. Change of Academic Status

Academic status is determined when grades are reported at the end of each fall and spring semester and at the end of the entire summer session. Although a student’s cumulative grade point average may change between these grade-reporting periods (e.g., by recording a final grade in place of an I), the student’s academic status is not changed until the next official grade-reporting period during which the student is enrolled at the University.

2. Removal from Academic Probation

Students on academic probation who achieve a 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA at the end of a grade-reporting period during which they are registered at the University will be removed from academic probation. Removal from probation will be reflected on the student’s permanent academic record.

3. Academic Warning

Before a student is dismissed from the University, the student is on academic warning. At the end of the warning semester, the student must earn a cumulative GPA that meets or exceeds the appropriate values in the Table of Academic Standards or a semester GPA of at least 2.5 to avoid dismissal.

4. Academic Continuance

After receiving an academic warning, students who earn a GPA of 2.5 or higher on a minimum of three semester credit hours each subsequent semester are given a one-semester continuance. After returning from a one- or a two-semester dismissal, students who fail to continuously earn a semester GPA of 2.5 or higher and/or reach appropriate Table of Standards values are dismissed for a 12-month period.

5. Academic Dismissals

Students placed on academic dismissal for the first time are eligible to continue enrollment after not having attended UT Arlington for one regular semester (fall or spring).

Students placed on academic dismissal for a second or subsequent time are eligible to apply for readmission after having not attended UT Arlington for a minimum 12-month period. After this time period, students may petition for reinstatement to the dean of the college/school in which they wish to major. Undeclared students petition the director of the University Advising Center. Students may obtain petition for readmission forms may be obtained at the deans’ offices or the University Advising Center. If the petition for reinstatement is disapproved, a student may not file another petition until the following semester. Appeal of a denial for reinstatement may be made to the assistant vice president for academic affairs within two weeks after the notice of the denial is mailed. The decision of the assistant vice president for academic affairs is final.

6. Students in Degree Programs

Students on academic probation (see the catalog section titled Academic Probation and Dismissal) who have been accepted into a degree program are subject to all additional rules governing the definition and terms of academic probation established by the program in which they are enrolled. The appropriate sections of this catalog and the offices of the academic deans should be consulted for specific requirements.

Students dismissed from a degree program or leaving a degree program voluntarily may transfer to another major or pre-major with the permission of the dean of the receiving college/school, or to undeclared status with the approval of the director of the University Advising Center.

Academic dismissal is reflected on the student’s permanent academic record.

Freshman Potential for Academic Success Policy

Effective Fall 2006, freshman students who earn less than a 2.0 grade point average during their first semester at UT Arlington will be required to enroll in and satisfactorily complete a one-hour course (EDUC 1131: Potential for Academic Success Seminar Freshman PASS) during the following long term. The course is designed to build academic study skills related to college success.

1. Students may not employ the grade exclusion policy to avoid taking the Freshman PASS course.
2. Students who do not enroll in an appropriate section of EDUC 1131 (Freshman PASS) by the Friday prior to the first day of classes will be dropped from all coursework for the term.
3. Students who are required to take EDUC 1131 for the Freshman PASS program must receive a grade of “P” (passing grade) in the course in order to remain enrolled in future academic sessions. Students who receive a grade of “F” (failing grade) in the course will be dropped from future academic sessions for which they are enrolled and future attempts to enroll will be blocked. Appeals for future enrollment will be considered by the Director of the University Advising Center.
4. Students who have already satisfied a version of EDUC 1131 through other affiliated programs (i.e., FIGs, Athletics, Major Exploration) must retake this course for the Freshman PASS program.
5. Academic colleges, schools and departments determine if any EDUC 1131 course may be used to satisfy degree requirements.
6. Students who were admitted to the University through a provisional program, such as Gateway Advantage, are not eligible to take this course to remain enrolled at the University.

Institutional Grading Policies

1. Computation of the Grade Point Average

The cumulative University grade point average for an undergraduate student is calculated on the basis of all work undertaken at UT Arlington for which a letter grade is recorded unless the course is repeated under the Grade Replacement Policy. Courses in which the symbol I, W, P or Z is recorded are excluded in calculating the grade point average.

The following grade procedure is used:

Grade Description Grade Points Per Semester Hour
A Excellent 4
B Good 3
C Fair 2
D Passing, Below Average 1
F Failure 0
X Incomplete 0
W Withdrawn 0
P Pass 0
Z No Credit 0

Grade Scores

Although a grade of D may be sufficient for an undergraduate to earn credit in a course, a cumulative University grade point average of at least 2.00 (C) is necessary for satisfactory progress toward a degree. A grade of I (incomplete) may be assigned for a course if, in the opinion of the instructor, there are extenuating circumstances which prevent the student from completing the required work within the semester of enrollment for the course. The incomplete must be removed by the end of the final examination period of the following semester, excluding the summer session, for the student to receive credit for the course. If the incomplete is not removed during the allotted time period, it will revert automatically to an F. As long as the grade is carried as an I, it will not be used in the calculation of the student’s grade point average. A student should not re-enroll in a course for which an I remains the grade of record. A course for which the symbol I, W, P or Z is given does not count as hours undertaken for the purpose of calculating the grade point average, and no grade points are earned. A course taken and passed on the pass/fail basis, including developmental courses, does count as hours undertaken, but no grade points are earned.

2. Effect of Grades in Courses Repeated

A student may repeat any course except as limited by individual colleges and schools, provided the student’s grade earned in an earlier semester is below C. Courses transferred for credit to UT Arlington from another college or university may not be repeated for credit. A student may not repeat a course for additional hours toward a degree unless the catalog description specifically states that the course may be repeated for credit.

Courses originally taken or repeated at another college will not affect a student’s grade point average at UT Arlington. If a student earned a grade of less than C in a course taken at UT Arlington, the student may take that course or its equivalent at another college or university for transfer to UT Arlington only with the prior written approval of the student’s major department chair or academic dean.

3. Grade Replacement and Grade Exclusion Policies

Grade Replacement Policy: This policy may be utilized by any student who has already completed a grade replacement for one or more courses at UT Arlington before the first day of classes for Fall 2006. The grade replacement policy is as follows: Upon receiving a grade of D or F in a course, a student may, after filing an intent to do so, replace the grade by repeating the course. The second grade earned, whether higher or lower, will be used in calculating the grade point average unless the second grade is a W. This policy applies only the second time a course is attempted. Both grades received will be shown on the student’s transcript. This policy will apply to a maximum of 10 credit hours at UT Arlington. Courses transferred for credit to UT Arlington from another college or university may not be repeated for credit. Students must file their intention to replace a grade with the Office of Records (Registrar). This policy will not apply to courses that may be repeated for credit nor to courses taken on a pass/fail basis. This policy is not applicable to graduate students and is not retroactive in that a grade in a course taken prior to adoption may be replaced, but a grade earned in a course prior to adoption (fall 1995) may not be used as a replacement. Individual colleges and schools may limit this policy. Students may not apply this policy to grades of D or F which result from disciplinary action. Students who have already completed a grade replacement for one or more courses at UT Arlington are not eligible to utilize the grade exclusion policy.

Grade Exclusion Policy: As of the first day of classes Fall 2006 and after, new students are eligible to utilize the grade exclusion policy.

Upon receiving a D or F in a course, a student may file a request with the Office of Admissions, Records and Registration for grade exclusion. The following conditions apply:

4. Pass/Fail Program (Engineering, Liberal Arts, Science, Nursing)

Students who are majors in the colleges of Engineering, Liberal Arts or Science, or in the School of Nursing may take courses on a pass/fail basis subject to differing rules established by these academic units. This policy is intended to offer students an opportunity to take courses that will broaden their education with less immediate emphasis on the need to achieve grade points. However, an F received in a pass/fail course will be evaluated the same as an F received on a regular basis, adversely affecting the grade point average. Students must inform the instructor of their intention to take a course on a pass/fail basis by the Census Date of the semester. Complete details and requirements of each college are available in the offices of the academic deans and in the departmental offices of the colleges.

Developmental Course Grades: Students assigned to developmental courses, as a result of TSI status will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

5. Grade Reports

Semester Reports from the Registrar: Grades are available on the Web at MyMav. Grades are posted at the end of each regular, summer, and intersession semester. The grade reported at the end of a semester is the official and permanent evaluation of a student’s performance in a given course. Official grade report copies are available in the Office of Admissions, Records and Registration for those students who need official verification for tuition reimbursement and other external programs. Students with transcript holds will not be able to access their grade reports.

Progress Reports: Freshmen, athletes and undeclared majors will receive an interim grade report. The progress report is not recorded on the student’s permanent record. It is for information purposes only and is intended to benefit the student, advisors and instructors. The grade reported at the end of a semester or term is the official and permanent evaluation of a student’s performance in a given course.

6. Student Grievance Procedures Related to Grades

In attempting to resolve any student grievances regarding grades, it is the student’s obligation first to make a serious effort to resolve the matter with the individual with whom the grievance originated. Individual course instructors retain primary responsibility for assigning grades. The instructor’s judgment is final unless compelling evidence shows discrimination, preferential treatment or procedural irregularities. If students wish to appeal, their request must be submitted in writing—on an appeal form available in departmental or program offices—to the department chair or program director. The student has one calendar year from the date the grade is assigned to initiate the grievance. The normal academic channels are department chair or program director, academic dean and the Office of the Provost. However, before considering a grievance, the department chair or program director (dean) will refer the issue to a departmental or program (college/school) committee of faculty. If the committee cannot reach a decision acceptable to the parties involved, the matter will follow the remaining academic channels. The decision of the provost is final. Information specific to the procedures to be followed in each academic unit is available in the office of the academic dean.

The dean of the college or school in which a student is enrolled, or the director of the University Advising Center if the student has not declared a pre-major or major, has jurisdiction over the student’s program of study, degree requirements and all other academic matters including grievances. However, students taking a course in a college or school other than the one in which they are primarily registered are subject to the dean of the college or school in which the course is offered concerning the course and academic grievances regarding the course.

For issues involving scholastic dishonesty, see the Academic Dishonesty entry in this section of the catalog.

State Limit on Dropped Courses

Students who enrolled in a Texas public institution of higher education as a first-time freshman in fall 2007 or later are permitted to drop no more than six courses during their entire undergraduate career. This limit includes all transfer work taken at a Texas institution of higher education and to second baccalaureate degrees. This statute was enacted by the State of Texas in spring 2007 (Texas Education Code 51.907). Any course that a student drops is counted toward the six-course limit if

“(1) the student was able to drop the course without receiving a grade or incurring an academic penalty;

  (2) the student’s transcript indicates or will indicate that the student was enrolled in the course; and

  (3) the student is not dropping the course in order to withdraw from the institution.”

A UT Arlington student affected by this statute that has attended or plans to attend another institution of higher education should become familiar with that institution’s policies on dropping courses. This statute applies across all Texas public institutions, but procedures for implementation may vary between institutions. Students affected by this policy may request an exemption to the policy by submitting a “Petition for Exemption to 6-Course Drop Policy” form. Students who enroll in coursework at more than one institution of higher education have an obligation to keep track of the number of dropped courses across all institutions and ensure that they do not exceed six dropped course limit.

Schedule Changes (Adds and Drops)

Adds and drops may be made through late registration either on the Web at MyMav or in person by contacting their major academic department (or the University Advising Center for undeclared students). Drops may continue in person until a point in time two-thirds of the way through the semester, session, or term. Students are responsible for adhering to the following regulations concerning adds and drops.

  1. A student may not add a course after the end of the late registration period.
  2. No grade is posted if a student drops a course before 5:00 p.m. on the Census Date of that semester/term.
  3. Students who enrolled in a Texas public institution of higher education as a first-time freshman in fall 2007 or later are permitted to drop no more than six courses during their entire undergraduate career. This limit includes all transfer work taken at a Texas institution of higher education and to second baccalaureate degrees. This statute was enacted by the State of Texas in spring 2007 (Texas Education Code 51.907). Any course that a student drops is counted toward the six-course limit if

    “(1) the student was able to drop the course without receiving a grade or incurring an academic penalty;

      (2) the student’s transcript indicates or will indicate that the student was enrolled in the course; and

      (3) the student is not dropping the course in order to withdraw from the institution.”

    A UT Arlington student affected by this statute that has attended or plans to attend another institution of higher education should become familiar with that institution’s policies on dropping courses. This statute applies across all Texas public institutions, but procedures for implementation may vary between institutions. Students affected by this policy may request an exemption to the policy by submitting a “Petition for Exemption to 6-Course Drop Policy” form. Students who enroll in coursework at more than one institution of higher education have an obligation to keep track of the number of dropped courses across all institutions and ensure that they do not exceed six dropped course limit.
  4. A student may drop a course with a grade of “W” until the two-thirds point of the semester, session, or course offering period. A student may drop a course after that point only upon approval of the appropriate official. A student may request an exception to the late drop policy by submitting a “Petition for Late Drop or Withdraw” request.
  5. Exceptions to this policy may be entertained because of extraordinary non-academic circumstances. Under such circumstances, approval must be received from the instructor, department chair, dean, and the Office of the Provost.

Students wanting to drop all courses for which they are enrolled must withdraw from the University for that semester/term. (Students should follow the procedure in the Withdrawal section of the Undergraduate Catalog.)

Withdrawals

Effective May/Summer terms 2006, a student may withdraw from all courses, from the first class day until a point in time two-thirds of the way through the semester/term, by contacting their major academic department (or the University Advising Center for undeclared students) for appropriate advisement and removal from the coursework. For students who entered a Texas public institution of higher education as a first-time freshman in fall 2007 or later, withdrawn courses do not count against the 6-dropped course limit imposed by Texas Education Code 51.907.

Requirement to Update Academic Records

UT Arlington students who also enroll at other institutions of higher education have an obligation to ensure that UT Arlington has a complete and accurate academic record. Students who enroll in coursework at other institutions must transfer a record of that coursework to UT Arlington’s Office of Admissions, Records and Registration at the conclusion of each semester.

Honor Roll

Students with excellent grades will be recognized by being listed on the Honor Roll. The Honor Roll will include those students who have both:

and

Satisfactory Scholastic Progress

A student is considered to be making satisfactory scholastic progress when:

Total Credit Hours Completed Minimum GPA
0-29 1.6
30-59 1.8
60 or more 2.0

Including transfer credit; based on classification at the end of the first semester at UT Arlington

Based on UT Arlington courses only

Enrollment as of Census Date Minimum Completion
12 or more 8
9-11 6
6-8 3
0-5 0

In extenuating circumstances, exceptions to the satisfactory scholastic progress regulations may be approved.

Academic Dishonesty

All students are expected to pursue their academic careers with honesty and integrity. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on a test or other course work, plagiarism (offering the work of another as one’s own) and unauthorized collaboration with another person. Students found responsible for dishonesty in their academic pursuits are subject to penalties that may range from disciplinary probation to suspension to expulsion from the University.

In accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System (Series 50101), institutional procedures regarding allegations of academic dishonesty are outlined in Part Two, Chapter 2, of the UT Arlington Handbook of Operating Procedures. This information may be obtained by accessing the Student Judicial Affairs Web site at www2.uta.edu/discipline/ or by obtaining a hard copy of Mav Dates & Data in the Office of Student Development.

Final Review Week

A period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabi. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week.

Final Examinations

Final examinations are scheduled at the end of each semester. In some courses, a departmental final examination is given. Final examinations will be given only at the time printed in the official class schedule. Exceptions must be approved in advance by the academic dean.

Classification

Students at UT Arlington are classified in accordance with the number of semester hours earned. Hours earned are interpreted as hours passed at UT Arlington plus hours accepted in transfer from other institutions and/or credit by examination.

Student Educational Records Policy

Students may have access to their own educational records during regular office hours by contacting the person or the office that maintains these records. A student may appear in person or make a written request for a copy of the record to be mailed. Another person may not see a student’s educational records unless the student gives written permission. Faculty and staff members of the University have access to student educational records in performance of regular duties. If an educational record contains information on more than one student, then a student desiring access may review only parts pertaining to that student.

Students may have official copies of their UT Arlington transcripts mailed to other institutions or may obtain copies for their own use. A student must sign a request form in the Office of Admissions, Records and Registration or mail a signed, written request to release the transcript. Transcripts also may be requested through the UT Arlington Web page at www.uta.edu/transcripts. Requests will not be accepted by telephone or from persons other than the student without that student’s written permission. Upon request, the University discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 provides that a university may release directory-type information about students. The information released may include the following items: the student’s name, address, electronic mail address (UTA-issued e-mail address), telephone number, date of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height if a member of an athletic team, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the last educational institution attended. Each year UT Arlington publishes a student directory that contains the student’s name, major field of study and telephone number. The law states that a student has the right to withhold this information from the public and other students. Directory-type information also may be withheld by editing your profile at MyMav. Unless this form is completed before the Census Date of the fall semester, this data will be released as public information.

Students have the right to challenge the content of their educational records to insure that their records are not inaccurate, misleading or in violation of other rights of the students. This allows students an opportunity to correct inaccurate or misleading information and permits written explanation concerning the content of the records. Any evidence regarding an inaccurate or misleading record should be presented to the individual in charge of the office where the record is maintained.

For admission, applicants are requested to submit their Social Security number, which serves as the basis for identification of various University records. Usage will vary according to requirements of the office in which the record is located.

A more detailed statement of the records policy is available in the Office of the Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration, Room 300, Davis Hall.

Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act

Campus Security

In compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, formerly the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (P.L. 101-542, as amended), The University of Texas at Arlington publishes specified campus crime statistics and campus security policies through the Office of the Chief of the University Police.

Campus security policies include:

Crime statistics may be accessed on the University Police Web site at www.uta.edu/police/crimestats.htm.

Graduation Rates

As of August 31, 2006, the graduation rate was 38.9 percent for students who entered The University of Texas at Arlington in fall 2000 on a full-time basis as first-time, degree-seeking freshmen.

Tuition for Excessive Undergraduate Hours

This policy is included in the Degree Program Requirements section of the catalog.