The University of Texas at Arlington

Undergraduate Catalog 2008-2009

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Volume XCII – July 2008
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email: ugcatalog@uta.edu

UT Arlington Undergraduate Catalog Fall 2008
Course Descriptions for Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 1282. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY LABORATORY (1-2) Laboratory exercises will illustrate basic concepts covered in BIOL 1333 and BIOL 1334. This course is for non-science majors, and, with 1333 and 1334, will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration and in the School of Social Work. Prerequisite: BIOL 1333.

BIOL 1301. NUTRITION (3-0) Nutrients essential to an adequate diet and good health and the nutritive values of common foods are reviewed. Offered as BIOL 1301 and HEED 1301: credit will be granted for only one of these courses. Students seeking certification in Health Education must enroll in HEED 1301. Students seeking credit toward their science requirement must enroll in BIOL 1301. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a BS degree in biology, microbiology, or medical technology.

BIOL 1310. CAREERS IN ALLIED HEALTH (3-0) An overview of allied health careers and concepts relevant to the health care industry. Topics include: the organization of health care in America, external factors affecting the health care industry, medical ethics, biotechnology and health care, and alternate careers in biology. May not be used for Biology grade point calculation or Biology credit toward a BS degree in Biology, Microbiology or Medical Technology.

BIOL 1333. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY I (3-0) (BIOL 1408) Emphasis is on fundamental principles, concepts, and topical subjects relating to biology. This course is for non-science majors and with 1334 and 1282, will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration, and in the School of Social Work.

BIOL 1334. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY II (3-0) A continuation of BIOL 1333. Students are encouraged to apply pertinent biological concepts to biologically-based problems in today's society. This course is for non-science majors, and with 1333 and 1282 will satisfy the laboratory science requirements for students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Business Administration and in the School of Social Work. Prerequisite: BIOL 1333.

BIOL 1441. CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3-2) (BIOL 1406) The first of a three-part introductory biology sequence, this course focuses on the chemical and molecular basis of life, including metabolism, cell structure and function, and genetics. Laboratory experiments are designed to complement theory presented in lecture. Formerly listed as BIOL 1449; credit will not be given for both.

BIOL 1442. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF ORGANISMS (3-2) The study of structure and function in plants and animals. Topics to be covered include structure at the level of the cell, tissue, organ and individual growth, transport/circulation/gas exchange, nutrition, reproduction, development, endocrinology, and animal neural regulation. The laboratory will examine plant and animal structure and function with observational and experimental approaches. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441.

BIOL 1450. COMPUTER LITERACY IN BIOLOGY (3-3) Basic computer skills and the utilization of biological resources on the Internet. Assignments are constructed to enable the student to acquire skills in the use of software programs on graphics, statistics, spread sheets, and word processing as they apply to the biological sciences. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 2300. INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS (3-0) Introduction to the collection, description, and analysis of data with statistical methods appropriate for biological sciences. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and BIOL 1442, or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 2317. BASIC CONCEPTS IN HUMAN SEXUALITY (3-0) The physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Offered as BIOL 2317, HEED 2317, PSYC 2317, and WOMS 2317. Credit will be granted for one of these courses only. Students seeking certification in Health Education must enroll in HEED 2317. Students seeking credit toward their science requirement must enroll in BIOL 2317. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a BS degree in biology, microbiology, medical technology, psychology, or sociology.

BIOL 2343. EVOLUTION & ECOLOGY (3-0) Reviews significant aspects of organismal biology and presents current hypotheses concerning the origin and diversification of life on earth. The ecological and behavioral interactions between organisms and their biotic/abiotic environments are considered from an evolutionary perspective. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441.

BIOL 2457. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (3-2) Functional morphology of humans, cellular function, principles of support and movement, and neural and endocrine control systems. Laboratory exercises involve both anatomical and experimental aspects of principles introduced in the lecture. This class is designed for students in sport activities (EXSA), medical technology and pre-nursing. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 or equivalent, and approval of the department. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.S. degree in biology or microbiology.

BIOL 2458. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (3-2) Functional morphology of humans, maintenance of the human body, and continuity of life. Topics will include the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, immune, and reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises explore both anatomical and experimental aspects of principles introduced in the lecture. This class is designed for students in sport activities (EXSA), medical technology, and pre-nursing. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 or the equivalent, BIOL 2457, and approval of the department. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.S. degree in biology or microbiology.

BIOL 2460. NURSING MICRO (3-3) The intention of this course is to present basic information, relevant to nursing practice, with the principles of microbiology and the nature of microbial disease. This course will give the nursing student a fundamental background of knowledge that will be applicable to the care of infectious patients, to the control of microbial diseases, and an understanding of microorganisms. The laboratory will provide practice in aseptic techniques, the use of disinfectants and antimicrobial agents, and microscopic study of bacteria. This course cannot be applied for credit toward a degree in Biology. No prerequisites.

BIOL 3101. CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (1-0) Seminar on significant topics and issues in modern biology. Students will present seminars on selected topics and participate in discussions of those topics. Topics will vary depending on instructor. This course will satisfy the oral communication competency required in Biology. May be repeated once for biology credit.

BIOL 3142. LABORATORY IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (0-3) Research methodologies employed in the study of the biological bases of behavior. Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in PSYC 3322 or BIOL 3322. Offered as BIOL 3142 and PSYC 3142; credit will be granted only once. BIOL prerequisite: BIOL 1441 & BIOL 1442. PSYC 3142 prerequisite: PSYC 2442 or PSYC 2444.

BIOL 3149. COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY (10-0) The purpose of this course is to allow students to earn college credit for relevant field work in the areas of biology and microbiology. Students must apply for the program and be cleared for registration during the semester prior to enrollment. These courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

BIOL 3170. LIMNOLOGY LABORATORY (0-3) A laboratory and field-based course designed to acquaint the student with common laboratory practices in the study of inland waters. Prerequisite: BIOL 3318 or concurrent enrollment.

BIOL 3177. ORAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN BIOLOGY (1-0) Study and practice of effective oral communication skills in Biology. Students will gain experience in developing effective oral communication techniques by learning to evaluate, prepare, and deliver oral presentations based on selected topics in Biology. This course will satisfy the Oral Communication Competency required in Biology. Graded by pass/fail only.

BIOL 3181. LABORATORY IN GENETICS (0-3) An experimental laboratory in which breeding experiments with certain plants, Neurospora and Drosophila, are used to verify the principles of classical genetics. In addition, studies on probability theory and analysis of results, population genetics, and salivary gland chromosomes are completed. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315 or concurrent enrollment.

BIOL 3182. BASIC AND APPLIED BIOSCIENCE (1-0) Designed to encourage junior and senior level biology students to explore career opportunities in biology and to develop degree plans that best suit their specific areas of interest as they near graduation. This seminar based course provides an overview of current employment and research.

BIOL 3249. COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY (10-0) The purpose of this course is to allow students to earn college credit for relevant field work in the areas of biology and microbiology. Students must apply for the program and be cleared for registration during the semester prior to enrollment. These courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

BIOL 3300. ANCIENT LIFE (3-0) This course reviews the biology, physiology, and ecology of extinct organisms from the first appearance of life on earth, through procaryotes, to eucaryotes, and the development of multicellularity through to the form and function of complex marine and terrestrial species. Throughout the course, emphasis will be on the biology of extinct organisms and how geological events have shaped the course of life on earth. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and 3454.

BIOL 3301. CELL PHYSIOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the basic physical, chemical, and biological principles which govern function in eukaryotic cells, and the relationships between cells and their environments. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441. CHEM 2181 and 2321 are recommended.

BIOL 3303. DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR (3-0) A survey of the psychoactive agents, their therapeutic uses, and social abuses. Alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, narcotics, hallucinogens, stimulants, and tranquilizers. Offered as BIOL 3303, HEED 3303, and PSYC 3303; credit will be granted only once. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.S. degree in biology, microbiology, or medical technology. Students seeking certification in health education must enroll in HEED 3303.

BIOL 3305. SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3-0) Study and application of the written and verbal communication skills involved in gathering, analyzing, and distributing scientific and technical information efficiently and accurately for specific scientific audiences. Can be used to satisfy the Technical Writing portion of English, Technical Writing and Speech requirement. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 1442, or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 3309. NON-MAJORS SELECTED TOPICS (3-0) Topics in biology not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as different topics are offered. May not be used for biology grade point calculation or biology credit toward a B.A. or B.S. degree in biology or a B.S. degree in microbiology.

BIOL 3310. SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (3-0) Topics in biology not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for biology elective credit as different topics are offered. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3311. SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY (3-0) Topics in microbiology not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for microbiology elective credit as different topics are offered. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444.

BIOL 3312. IMMUNOBIOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the components, properties, and manifestations of the adaptive immune response that occurs in vertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444. CHEM 2181, 2321 are recommended.

BIOL 3315. GENETICS (3-0) Principles of molecular and classical genetics. The function and transmission of hereditary material in microorganisms, plants, and animals, including humans. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441.

BIOL 3316. ASTROBIOLOGY (3-0) This is an interdisciplinary course between astrophysics, biology, and geology. Topics include properties of life, origin and evolution of life on Earth, mass extinctions, extremophiles, search for life in the Solar System, space missions, stellar habitable zones, SETI, Fermi paradox, Drake equation. Prerequisites: PHYS 1441, 1442, 2315 and BIOL 3315, or permission by the instructor. Offered as BIOL 3316, GEOL 3316, and PHYS 3316; credit will be granted only once.

BIOL 3317. GENOMICS (3-0) This course presents an integrative approach to genome science, combining elements of genetics, state of the art technologies in genomic analysis. A basic knowledge of genetics and probability concepts is required. Use of the World Wide Web will be an essential part of the course. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3318. LIMNOLOGY (3-0) The living and nonliving components of inland waters. An introduction to the geological, physical, and chemical background, and to the major organisms and ecological processes. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442 or equivalent.

BIOL 3319. HUMAN GENETICS (3-0) This course will enable students to comprehend the basic principles of genetics applied to human inheritance and disease, to interpret the research strategies aimed to identify and study the genes responsible for diverse functions and traits, as well as to assess the consequences of the genetic technologies in our society. Prerequisites: BIOL 1441 and 3315.

BIOL 3320. GENETICS-EL PAS (3-0)

BIOL 3322. INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (3-0) A comprehensive survey of physiological processes and structures underlying human and animal behavior. PSYC 3142 is an optional laboratory which, when taken concurrently with or after completion of PSYC 3322, satisfies a portion of the laboratory requirement. Formerly listed as PSYC 4322. Offered as BIOL 3322 and PSYC 3322; credit will be granted only once. BIOL 3322 prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3325. PLANT ECOLOGY (3-0) Introduction to the field of plant ecology including physiological, population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1442, 2343, 3427 or equivalent basic background in ecology and botany.

BIOL 3326. ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3-0) A survey of research and theory comparing behavior at various phyletic levels. Offered as BIOL 3326 and PSYC 3326. Credit will be granted for only one of these courses. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3328. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the principles, methodology, and practical applications and implications of environmental microbiology. Lecture topics include habitat and community approaches to environmental microbiology, measures of microbial populations and activities, interactions among microbial communities, the role of microorganisms in the origin of mineral resources, microorganisms and pollution, and current developments on energy flow through microbial communities. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444.

BIOL 3329. BEHAVIORAL ENDOCRINOLOGY (3-0) The effects of hormones on behavior and the physiological mechanisms which mediate these effects. Principles of brain-hormone interaction, sexual and aggressive behavior, parental care, ingestion, activity, motivation, learning and memory, behavioral disorders, environmental, and experiential influences on hormone production. Also offered as PSYC 3329; credit will be granted for only one of these courses. Students seeking credit toward the science requirement must enroll in BIOL 3329. Prerequisite: PSYC 1315, or BIOL 4315.

BIOL 3330. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (3-0) The primary goal of this course is to describe how organismic complexity is generated during embryonic and post-embryonic development. The course will cover current areas of research in developmental biology which include: the roles of genetic networks, induction events, cell lineage, maternal inheritance, cell-cell communication, and hormonal control in developmental processes in well-suited organisms such as vertebrates, insects, and nematodes. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 1442.

BIOL 3333. CELL BIOLOGY (3-0) A survey of current knowledge of cell structure and function from the microscopic to the molecular level. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343, and one year of chemistry.

BIOL 3339. INTRODUCTION TO EVOLUTION (3-0) Processes and mechanisms which cause evolutionary changes in organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343, 3315.

BIOL 3340. MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY (3-0) The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the biology of harmful arthropods, life cycles of transmitted pathogens, disease symptoms and epidemiology, as well as approaches to control arthropod-born diseases. Classes will also cover unorthodox points of intersection between entomology and medical sciences, including psychiatry, surgery, and forensic medicine. Prerequisites: BIOL 1442 or equivalent.

BIOL 3341. ENTOMOLOGY (2-3) This course is a study of the basic principles of insect life including structure, physiology, life cycles, and classification. Certain related arthropods are included. Lab work emphasizes collection and identification of local insects. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442.

BIOL 3343. GENERAL MYCOLOGY (2-3) A survey of the fungi; their morphology, taxonomy, life cycles, and identification of representative organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444.

BIOL 3345. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (3-0) Study of human function from the cellular through organismal levels. Attention will be paid to the interrelationships between physiological research and medicine. Will give students a knowledge of the basic principles of structure, function and functional integration of human tissues and organs. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 1442.

BIOL 3346. HUMAN ANATOMY (2-3) Study of the gross functional anatomy of the human body. Students will participate in laboratory exercises designed to familiarize them with human anatomical structures and their functions. Use of eponyms for anatomical terms will be minimized. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3347. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (3-0) Examines major environmental problems that affect biological systems with an emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343, 3315 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3348. PLANT SYSTEMATICS (2-3) The biology of plants, their classification, general morphology, and environmental relationships. Lab work includes the identification of local and Texas flora. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343; 3327 or 3427.

BIOL 3349. COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN BIOLOGY (10-0) The purpose of this course is to allow students to earn college credit for relevant field work in the areas of biology and microbiology. Students must apply for the program and be cleared for registration during the semester prior to enrollment. These courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

BIOL 3352. INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC LAB SCIENCE (2-3) An introduction to the various disciplines of Forensic Science including DNA analysis, drug analysis, and firearms basics. Laboratory consists of hands-on investigation of mock crime scenes, fingerprint enhancement methods, and biological analysis of fluids. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, CHEM 1441.

BIOL 3353. PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY (2-3) The major groups of disease-causing bacteria, including group characteristics, host ranges, pathogenic mechanisms, and public health significance. This course is reserved for Microbiology and Medical Technology majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, BIOL 3444, CHEM 2181, CHEM 2321, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 3355. TOXICOLOGY (3-0) An introduction to the general principles of toxicology with an emphasis on certain classes of toxic agents, their sources and toxic effects, as well as their environmental fates. Pollution of various media (air, water and soil) and the differences between them will be discussed. Prerequisite: CHEM 2322 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3360. PRACTICUM IN ZOO RESEARCH METHODS (3-0) A hands-on introduction to research methodologies commonly used to collect behavioral and physiological data in zoos. Students will learn how to develop an ethogram, design data sheets, observe animals and collect data. Data will be summarized, analyzed, interpreted and presented in both written and oral form. Prerequisite: PSYC 2443, PSYC 2444, PSYC 3326 (or their equivalents) and permission of instructor. Offered as BIOL 3360 and PSYC 3352; credit will be granted only once.

BIOL 3371. TEACHING BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS I (3-0) Teaching current concepts in the chemical/molecular basis of life, cellular metabolism/structure/function and genetics. This class cannot be taken for Biology majors credit by students in the Biology or Microbiology B.S. degree programs. It is intended for students pursuing a career in science teaching. Prerequisite: permission of the Biology Teacher Certification Advisor and the Biology Undergraduate Advisor.

BIOL 3372. TEACHING BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS II (3-0) Teaching current concepts in animal and plant structure/function including cell, tissue, organ and organismal structure, growth, transport/circulation/gas exchange, nutrition, reproduction, development, endocrinology, and animal neural regulation. This class cannot be taken for Biology majors credit by students in the Biology or Microbiology B.S. degree programs. It is intended for students pursuing a career in science teaching. Prerequisite: permission of the Biology Teacher Certification Advisor and the Biology Undergraduate Advisor.

BIOL 3373. TEACHING BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS III (3-0) Teaching current concepts in evolution, ecology and biodiversity including the origin and diversification of life on Earth, and the ecological and behavioral interactions between organisms and their biotic/abiotic environments from an evolutionary perspective. This class cannot be taken for Biology majors credit by students in the Biology or Microbiology B.S. degree programs. It is intended for students pursuing a career in science teaching. Prerequisite: permission of the Biology Teacher Certification Advisor and the Biology Undergraduate Advisor.

BIOL 3374. TEACHING BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS IV (2-2) Current concepts in laboratory teaching in biology. This course will cover modern methods of teaching laboratories in biology designed by master biology teachers and various biology publishers. This class cannot be taken for Biology majors credit by students in the Biology or Microbiology B.S. degree programs. It is intended for students pursuing a career in science teaching. Prerequisite: permission of the Biology Teacher Certification Advisor and the Biology Undergraduate Advisor.

BIOL 3427. PLANT SCIENCE (3-3) A survey of plant science including the importance of plants to people and the human side of botany: the structure, reproduction, physiology, and classification of plants. The laboratory includes the study of structure, function, reproduction, and classification of plants. Replaces BIOL 3327 and BIOL 3183. Credit cannot be given for BIOL 3427 and BIOL 3327 and 3183. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442 or equivalent.

BIOL 3442. PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (3-3) A comparative study of animal function. Evidence from different groups of animals, particularly the vertebrates, to identify the general principles of physiological mechanisms operating at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels. Laboratory studies will complement lecture material and will stress experimental design, data analysis, and the understanding of critical research in physiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442. BIOL 3301 recommended.

BIOL 3444. GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (3-3) Fundamental principals of microbiology including the structure and function of microbial cells and their activities in nature. Bacteria will be used in the laboratory to provide training and experimental methodology. Formerly listed as BIOL 2451; credit will not be granted for both. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and one year of Chemistry.

BIOL 3445. METHODS IN MICROBIOLOGY (2-6) Advanced instruction in the laboratory techniques required for isolation, cultivation, identification and enumeration of bacteria and their viruses. Formerly listed as BIOL 2459; credit will not be granted for both. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444, or equivalent.

BIOL 3446. MARINE BIOLOGY (3-4) Study of the biota and ecology of marine coastal environments with special emphasis on the Gulf of Mexico. Will be taught in the Summer Intersession (formerly called Maymester) with one week of lecture at U.T. Arlington and one week of lecture/laboratory at the Marine Science Institute of the University of Texas in Port Aransas, Texas. Laboratory will include field trips to coastal marine habitats, study of live marine organisms and independent student experiments. Prerequisite: BIOL 1442 and 2343 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3452. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY (3-4) A comparative study of the anatomy of the protochordates and the vertebrates. The laboratory includes a detailed study of the shark and the cat. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and 2343.

BIOL 3454. GENERAL ZOOLOGY (3-3) An overview of animal life including the diversity and evolution of major animal phyla, reproduction, development and aspects of physiological function. The laboratory examines form, function and phyletic relationships in a wide variety of animal types. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 3455. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (3-4) The structure, function, and evolution of invertebrate animals. Survey covers all invertebrate phyla with the exception of protozoa and includes the invertebrate chordates. Emphasis is on the major animal phyla. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343.

BIOL 3457. GENERAL ECOLOGY (3-3) An examination of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the relationship between the biological and physical environments (organisms, food, space, and time) at the individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343.

BIOL 4179. DIRECTED STUDY (1-0) Independent study by individual students in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Topics must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 4189. RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY (0-0) Research problems on an individual basis, conducted under the direction of a member of the biology faculty. A limit of two hours per semester is imposed and only a total of three hours may be counted toward degree requirements. These courses are offered only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite:written permission of the supervising instructor prior to registration.

BIOL 4279. DIRECTED STUDY (2-0) Independent study by individual students in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Topics must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 4289. RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY (0-0) Research problems on an individual basis, conducted under the direction of a member of the biology faculty. A limit of two hours per semester is imposed and only a total of three hours may be counted toward degree requirements. These courses are offered only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite:written permission of the supervising instructor prior to registration.

BIOL 4301. ADVANCED NEUROSCIENCE (3-0) An in depth understanding of the mechanism underlying the function of the nervous system. Topics include cellular mechanisms of neural communication, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology of sensory, motor, and autonomic systems, cellular mechanisms of learning and memory, and neuropathological conditions that contribute to neurological disorders. Prerequisite: BIOL or PSYC 3322 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4302. MICROBIAL GENETICS (3-0) Consideration of the physical, chemical, and functional nature of genetic processes in micro-organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4305. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY (3-0) Survey of the physiological adaptations of animals to their environments. Emphasizes physiological mechanisms and evolutionary changes that allow animals to survive under and respond to a variety of environmental conditions. Prerequisite: BIOL 3442 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4307. MOLECULAR EVOLUTION (3-0) This course focuses on understanding how genes and genomes evolve at the molecular level. Molecular biology provides the data while population genetics provides the theoretical framework. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315, BIOL 3339.

BIOL 4308. GENOME STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS (3-0) This course will describe how genes and genomes are organized in a variety of species from all kingdoms of life and will provide a detailed overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the function and evolution of genomes. Particular emphasis will be given to the human genome project and its biomedical implications. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315.

BIOL 4309. NEUROPHARMACOLOGY (3-0) A survey of how drugs affect the nervous system. General topics will include cellular and molecular foundations of neuropharmacology, receptors and modulation of neural signaling. The specific role of neurotransmitter systems (i.e. acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and opiate) will be explored. Offered as BIOL 4309 and PSYC 4302; credit will be granted only once. Prerequisite: BIOL 3322 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 4312. INTRODUCTION TO VIROLOGY (3-0) The nature, reproduction, and host cell interactions of viruses and virus-like agents of bacteria, animals, and plants. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444, 3315 or 3333.

BIOL 4313. MOLECULAR GENETICS (3-0) A comprehensive survey of molecular genetics with an emphasis on eucaryotic systems: DNA structure and chromosome arrangement; molecular evolution; gene regulation and expression; RNA processing; signal transduction; cancer biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3315.

BIOL 4315. GENERAL ENDOCRINOLOGY (3-0) The vertebrate endocrine system. The cellular origin of hormones, their role in physiological regulation, and the mechanism of hormone action. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 3301, 3315; at least one physiology course, and senior standing.

BIOL 4325. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOBIOLOGY (3-0) The biological basis of behavioral development. A survey of the influences of maternal factors, genes, hormones, teratogens, early nutrition, and environmental change upon the maturation of the central nervous system. Basic concepts such as critical periods, the organization of behavioral systems, neural plasticity, and the ontogeny of consciousness. Offered as BIOL 4325 and PSYC 4325; credit will be granted only once. Students seeking credit toward the science requirement must enroll in BIOL 4325. Prerequisite: PSYC 3310 or PSYC 3322 (BIOL 3322), or BIOL 3346.

BIOL 4326. WETLAND ECOLOGY (3-0) Introduction to the diverse field of wetland ecology including formation of wetlands, biogeochemistry of wetland soils, hydrology, and biotic adaptations to wetland environments. Prerequisite: CHEM 1301, BIOL 2343.

BIOL 4327. BEHAVIORAL GENETICS (3-0) Genetic influences on behavioral phenotypes. Research strategies, quantitative methods, and pharmacogenetic approaches to the brain; sociality and altruism; the personality, emotionality and intelligence; psychopathology; chromosomal abnormalities; forensic implications of genetic counseling. Offered as BIOL 4327 and PSYC 4327; credit will be granted only once. Students seeking credit toward the science requirement must enroll in BIOL 4327. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315 or PSYC 2441.

BIOL 4330. EVOLUTION OF DEVELOPMENT (3-0) The diversity of animal and plant forms can largely be raced to evolutionary changes in the genes that control the development of the embryo. Changes in when and where these genes are active have been important in the diversification of body form. A major goal of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary framework for studies related to evolution, genetics, and development. The course will mainly consist of lecturers and seminars; relevant scientific papers will be read and commented on in class. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 1442.

BIOL 4338. COMMUNITY ECOLOGY (3-0) The effects interspecific interactions have on the distribution and abundance of organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343, and three semester hours of ecology.

BIOL 4340. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (3-0) The relationship of plant metabolism to cellular organization and the interaction of environmental, metabolic, and hormonal factors of vegetative growth and reproduction. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343.

BIOL 4343. PLANT ANATOMY (2-3) The internal structure of the existing seed plants, with emphasis on the angiosperms. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343, 3327 or 3427.

BIOL 4346. TECHNIQUES IN MICROBIAL AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (1-5) A laboratory based techniques course focusing on current methods in microbial and molecular genetics. Students will design experiments and perform: bacterial mutagenesis and phage transduction; selection, screening and physical mapping of mutants; blots, plasmid manipulations including purification, digestion, subcloning, bacterial transformations; PCR and DNA sequencing. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 3444, and 3315 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 4348. AQUATIC BIOLOGY (2-3) Ecological relationships of organisms in freshwater and marine ecosystems. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 4350. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (3-0) Introduction to theory and practice of conservation biology, with emphasis on applications of modern quantitative and genetic techniques to preservation of organisms and habitats. Topics include identification and prioritization of units for protection; conservation genetics; preserve design; public policy issues; and case studies. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315 or equivalent (Genetics), or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 4352. FORENSIC BIOLOGY (3-0) A comprehensive review of biological principles, applied to forensic science, including sample recovery and handling, analytical techniques, profile matching/exclusion, reporting, and testimony. Prerequisite: BIOL 3315, 3339, 3352, and a course in statistics (BIOL 2300 recommended) or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 4353. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE (1-4) Principles and operation of the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Training in the use of the JEOL, JSM, SEM. Specimen preparation for SEM included in the lecture and laboratory. Open to non-biologists. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

BIOL 4354. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (3-0) Basics of the broad range of health considerations at the core of environmental projects and regulation. The course will provide the knowledge required for students to successfully complete the Texas Registered Sanitarian Examination or the Environmental Health Association's Registered Environmental Health Specialist Examination. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442; CHEM 1301, 1302; PHYS 1441 or permission of the environmental biology option advisor.

BIOL 4355. METHODS IN FORENSIC BIOLOGY (1-6) Analysis of typical biological evidentiary samples including extraction of DNA, quantitation, amplification and electrophoresis of examples. Instrumentation utilized includes thermal cyclers and ABI 377 genetic analyzer. Prerequisite: BIOL 4352 or concurrent enrollment.

BIOL 4357. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3-0) This course provides a broad introduction to health psychology and its interface with the medical world. The course provides a balanced presentation of the important issues in the field, as well as specific content topics that are especially relevant today to better understand health and illness. Offered as BIOL 4357, HEED 4357, and KINE 4357. Students seeking science requirement credit must enroll in BIOL 4357; students seeking Certification in Health must enroll in HEED 4357. Prerequisite: no prerequisite; junior standing recommended.

BIOL 4379. DIRECTED STUDY (3-0) Independent study by individual students in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Topics must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 4388. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES IN BIOLOGY (0-6) Students will participate in laboratory instruction and student recitation sessions under the supervision of a faculty member. A maximum of 3 hours can be applied to the major for biology or microbiology credit. Enrollment by departmental permission only. A maximum of 6 hours credit from this class will be used to calculate a student's grade point average. Students on probation or who have not qualified for major status may not enroll in this course.

BIOL 4393. HONORS SENIOR PROJECT IN BIOLOGY (1-5) A topic will be selected after consultation with a supervising professor and will involve both original research and writing a formal report. The work will be evaluated by a faculty honors committee. Completion of this course will satisfy the thesis requirement for the Honors College described elsewhere in this catalog.

BIOL 4395. FORENSICS-EL PA (3-0)

BIOL 4444. VERTEBRATE NATURAL HISTORY (3-3) Lecture will cover the systematics, life histories, morphology, ethology and distribution of world vertebrates, with emphasis on tetrapods. The laboratory will provide the opportunity to examine and identify a taxonomically comprehensive collection of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343.

BIOL 4445. MICROBIAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION (3-3) This course considers the anatomy and physiology of the bacterial cell in detail. Lecture topics consider the molecular architecture of cell walls, membranes and organelles, synthesis of wall material and membranes, insertion of proteins into membranes and regulation of biosynthetic systems at the whole cell level. The laboratory focuses on growth of the bacterial cell, single and multiple substrate utilization, and growth kinetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 and 3444. CHEM 4311 recommended. This course is reserved for Microbiology majors.