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In the News 2013

December

A new way to spot storms

Thursday, December 19, 2013

The newest CASA radar unit, installed Tuesday in Midlothian, could be the first of several new low-level radars that will provide Dallas-Fort Worth with a detailed look at developing thunderstorms and tornadoes this spring, KDFW Fox 4 reported. The first CASA radar unit installed in North Texas was at UT Arlington, Fox 4's Chief Meteorologist Dan Henry said.

Inventors honored

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Four University of Texas at Arlington faculty members and senior administrators have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, Phys.org and Bio-News Texas reported. They are Frank Lewis, electrical engineering professor and a University Distinguished Scholar Professor; Carolyn Cason, a nursing professor and vice president for research; Ron Elsenbaumer, professor of chemistry and biochemistry and provost and vice president for academic affairs; and UT Arlington President Vistasp M. Karbhari, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of civil and environmental engineering.

New radar debuts

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

The newest CASA radar unit, installed Tuesday in Midlothian, could be one of several new low-level radars that will provide Dallas-Fort Worth with a detailed look at developing thunderstorms and tornadoes this spring, The Dallas Morning News reported. The first CASA radar unit installed in North Texas is at UT Arlington, the article said. Business Week and several other websites reported the installation of the Midlothian unit.

Visualizing cell phone signals

Friday, December 13, 2013

Ian Kersey has created a new image on iconic American locales by visualizing the millions of cell phone signals emanating from those areas, Thought Catalog reported. Kersey verified his artistic photographs with electrical engineers from across the country including J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor.

Improving public transportation

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Stephen Mattingly, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, will investigate how advanced technologies can improve public transportation and alternative transportation modes as part of a national initiative aimed at developing more "livable communities," Phys.org and Ahead of the Curve reported.

Chiao mentioned in article about cell phone signals visualized

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Ian Kersey put a new image on iconic American locales by visualizing the millions of cell phone signals emanating from those areas, BigMicrow and Into Mobile reported. Kersey verified his artsy photographs with electrical engineers from across the country including J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor.

Personalizing care

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant engineering professor, Shouyi Wang, has developed a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient's personalized medical information, The Almagest reported. Wang is in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering. His paper "Online Seizure Prediction Using an Adaptive Learning Approach" was published in IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.

Predicting an epileptic seizure

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant engineering professor has developed a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient's personalized medical information, according to the website Medical News Today. The research conducted by Shouyi Wang, an assistant professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, has been in the paper "Online Seizure Prediction Using an Adaptive Learning Approach" in IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.

High speed rail

Monday, December 2, 2013

KTVT/CBS 11 reported on a UT Arlington feasibility study of high-speed rail in Texas. The study shows that trips between most city pairs that use existing Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) right-of-way can be made in less than two hours. Steve Mattingly, a UT Arlington civil engineer who conducted the case study, evaluated routes between Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston and several others.

Artistic endeavor

Monday, December 2, 2013

Jacky Sylvie, special programs coordinator for the UT Arlington College of Engineering, was profiled in The Dallas Morning News. The story focused on her background and artistic endeavor – a line of jewelry made from vinyl records called Hi-Fi Jewelry.

November

High speed rail study noted

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

A UT Arlington feasibility study of high-speed rail in Texas shows that trips between most city pairs that use existing Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) right-of-way can be made in less than two hours, making it competitive with air travel and superior to highway driving, the website Railway Track & Structures said. Steve Mattingly, a UT Arlington civil engineer who conducted the case study, evaluated routes between Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston and several others. The Dallas Observer also featured a blog post on the study.

Mining tool for e-health records

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Recent National Science Foundation grants to UT Arlington, SMU and UT Southwestern to develop mining tools for electronic health records were mentioned in a FierceHealthIT story about using records to link genetic variants and diseases.

Envisioning a bullet train

Monday, November 25, 2013

One of the cheapest and most effective ways to build high-speed rail in Texas could be to place the tracks right on top of highway right-of-way, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram said in a story on a new study led by Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering professor. The study adds fuel for thought as passenger rail advocates work on a plan to build a bullet train service connecting Dallas-Fort Worth to Houston, possibly by 2021. “I’m really pleased at the times that were achievable,” said Mattingly.

Health predictions studied

Monday, November 25, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant engineering professor has developed a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient's personalized medical information, according to the website Science Daily and e!Science News. The research conducted by Shouyi Wang, an assistant professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, was published under the title "Online Seizure Prediction Using an Adaptive Learning Approach" in IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.


A model for health

Friday, November 22, 2013

News Medical reported on research by Shouyi Wang, a UT Arlington assistant professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering, developing a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient’s personalized medical information. Smart Economy, e! Science News and Phys.org also featured the research.

Data needs to be private but available for analysis

Thursday, November 21, 2013

EMR & HIPAA.com noted research by UT Arlington in a story about doctors compromising patient privacy. The piece acknowledged that plenty of work is underway to improve EMR technology, adding: "For example, at UT Arlington, researchers are leading a National Science Foundation project to keep healthcare data secure while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis. They hope to produce groundbreaking algorithms and tools for identifying privacy leaks."

American Heart Association honors Nguyen

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, has been named an American Heart Association fellow, an honor conferred by the national organization’s Council on Basic Cardiovascular Sciences, Hispanic Business.com and Phys.org reported. Nguyen specializes in cellular engineering. Her research also involves tissue engineering, drug delivery and stem cell therapies.

Professors' research work noted

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Two University of Texas at Arlington scientists working on innovative energy supply solutions are included in the first round of grants for the National Science Foundation’s new Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering and Materials program, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. Chemistry professor Fred MacDonnell and Norma Tacconi, a recently retired research associate professor, were awarded a three-year, $430,346 grant to study a new method for converting carbon dioxide to methanol. Qiming Zhang, a physics professor, was awarded a three-year, $188,548 grant to study the use of sulfurized hematite to build more efficient solar cell technologies. Also, Samarendra Mohanty, assistant professor of physics, will receive a total of $384,269 over the next two years from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. His work involves using a near-infrared ultrafast laser beam to deliver genes that allow expression of light-sensitive proteins, called opsins, in specific cells.

Armstrong recognized

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Dallas Business Journal recognized University of Texas at Arlington Professor Daniel Armstrong as an innovative leader in the fields of separations and mass spectrometry. He is No. 16 on a recent list of the most influential people in analytical sciences published by The Analytical Scientist magazine. Armstrong is UT Arlington’s Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry.

Students awarded EPA research fellowships

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Water & Wastes Digest reported on the more than $1.65 million in research fellowships that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded to 33 students at various schools including UT Arlington. All of the undergraduates are pursuing degrees in environmental science and related fields. The fellowships were given through the EPA’s Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) Fellowship program.

Organizing complexity

Monday, November 18, 2013

Li Zeng, a UT Arlington assistant professor of Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering, has received a $142,223 National Science Foundation grant to develop a mathematical method of ensuring for consistency in various manufacturing processes that produce complex data, News Fix (Toronto) reported.

NIH grant to fuel research

Friday, November 15, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant professor of physics has received a $384,000 National Institutes of Health grant to explore a better method for initiating certain gene therapies that could help fight retinitis pigmentosa, a vision-deteriorating disease, D Magazine’s Healthcare Daily reported. Samarendra Mohanty will receive the money over the next two years from the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. His work involves using a near-infrared ultrafast laser beam to deliver genes that allow expression of light-sensitive proteins in specific cells.

Zeno robot to assist with research

Friday, November 15, 2013

UT Arlington is among 30 universities across the world that have programmed Zeno R50, a robot that can interact with people via voice and facial expressions, to assist with research, the Dallas Business Journal reported. The company that created the walking, talking robots is in the last few weeks of a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for its technology.

Civil engineer concerned about pipeline risks

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The Dallas Observer interviewed Mohammad Najafi, director of the Center for Underground Infrastructure Research at UT Arlington, for its story about the Keystone pipeline. In a matter of weeks, crude oil will begin flowing through the Gulf Coast portion of the pipeline in Texas, but a watchdog group questions the integrity of the project and wonders whether it is ready to operate. “The number of potential issues that are raised, and the quality control problems concern me as well,” Najafi said.

Defense challenges

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, who now heads the UT Arlington Research Institute, was interviewed for a TMCNet.com article about new challenges reshaping national defense technology.

Guarding medical data

Monday, November 11, 2013

The work of two UT Arlington computer science and engineering professors to protect sensitive electronic medical data was featured in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram business column. Heng Huang and Guatam Das, through a $740,000 National Science Foundation project, have developed a computational model that will guard private information while still allowing the medical data to be used.

Ensuring privacy in e-health records

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Two UT Arlington researchers are leading a collaborative National Science Foundation project to protect personal, electronic healthcare data while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis and improved health care, ECN.com reported. Associate Professor Heng Huang and Professor Gautam Das, both of the UT Arlington Computer Science & Engineering Department, have teamed to develop the new computational model that will de-identify information in electronic health records.

Protecting data

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Two UT Arlington researchers are leading a collaborative National Science Foundation project to protect personal, electronic healthcare data while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis and improved health care, Phys.org reported. Associate Professor Heng Huang and Professor Gautam Das, both of the UT Arlington Computer Science & Engineering Department, have teamed to develop the new computational model that will de-identify information in electronic health records.

Computer science team developing system to ensure privacy in electronic health records

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Two UT Arlington researchers are leading a collaborative National Science Foundation project to protect personal, electronic healthcare data while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis and improved health care, 10 Gigabit Ethernet and TMCnet.com reported. Associate Professor Heng Huang and Professor Guatam Das, both of the UT Arlington Computer Science & Engineering Department, are leading the effort.

Flooding prediction

Monday, November 4, 2013

A network of faster and more precise storm detection radar units is expected to provide up to 20 minutes of additional warning time when the spring storm season flares up in Dallas-Fort Worth, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. At UT Arlington, the civil engineering department will use data collected by the network to analyze flash flooding in urban environments. “This is where hydrology meets meteorology,” associate professor D.J. Seo has said.

Student recognized as engineering leader of tomorrow

Friday, November 1, 2013

UT Arlington's Yayu "Monica" Hew, an aerospace engineering and physics student, was among the award winners in Penton's Aviation Week's "Tomorrow's Engineering Leaders: The Twenty20s," WAND Channel 17 in Decatur, Ill., Fresh News, WAFB in Phoenix, Az., WCIV 4 in Charleston, S.C., and many other media outlets reported. The awards, produced in partnership with Raytheon, recognize top engineering, math, science and technology students.

October

Tracking medical records

Thursday, October 31, 2013

The National Science Foundation has awarded three collaborative grants amounting to $892,587 to The University of Texas at Arlington, Southern Methodist University and the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center at Dallas to develop data mining tools for electronic health records, Clinical Innovation.com reported. Electronic medical record data mining is increasingly being recognized as a potential bonanza for conducting identifying high-risk patients and helping improve healthcare.

Mining medical e-records

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

The National Science Foundation has awarded three collaborative grants amounting to $892,587 to The University of Texas at Arlington, Southern Methodist University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas to develop data mining tools for electronic health records, FierceEMR.com reported. Electronic medical record data mining is increasingly being recognized as a potential bonanza for identifying high-risk patients and helping improve healthcare.

Mining health records

Thursday, October 24, 2013

A UT Arlington computer scientist is leading a new, National Science Foundation project to mine electronic medical records data to help physicians personalize patient treatment, predict health care needs and identify risks that can lead to readmission, TMCnet reported. Heng Huang, an associate professor of the Computer Science & Engineering Department, is the principal investigator on a $461,098 grant titled “Robust Large-Scale Electronic Medical Record Data Mining Framework to Conduct Risk Stratification for Personalized Intervention.”

Moving innovation forward

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

The University of Texas at Arlington and TechFW, a Fort Worth-based technology startup initiative, have agreed to a multi-year partnership to commercialize University research and move innovation to the marketplace, according to Yahoo! NewsReutersBloomberg BusinessWeek and the Austin Business Journal. TechFW@UTA will offer training and educational programs to UT Arlington faculty, staff and students. UT Arlington faculty members and research teams will gain access to the North Texas entrepreneurial community through the TechFW network.

Efficient jet engines

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

UT Arlington aerospace engineering student Ezgihan (Izzy) Baydar has been awarded a NASA Harriet G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship that will allow her to pursue her research into efficient jet engines in conjunction with the space agency, according to the Fort Worth Business Press. Baydar and her adviser, Frank Lu, professor in the mechanical and aerospace engineering department, were awarded the three-year fellowship, which provides $135,000 in funding and includes summer internships at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

Engineers' battery research showcased

Monday, October 14, 2013

Two UT Arlington engineering faculty members have won a $152,077 Office of Naval Research grant to study the thermal properties of lithium-ion batteries and devise better designs for cooling and operating them safely on Navy ships and planes, the website Smart Energy Universe reported. David Wetz, electrical engineering assistant professor, and Ankur Jain, aerospace and mechanical engineering assistant professor, are working collaboratively on the research effort.

New Naval Research grant

Friday, October 11, 2013

Two UT Arlington engineering faculty members have won a $152,077 Office of Naval Research grant to study the thermal properties of lithium-ion batteries and devise better designs for cooling and operating them safely on Navy ships and planes, ECN magazine reported. David Wetz, electrical engineering assistant professor, and Ankur Jain, aerospace and mechanical engineering assistant professor, are working collaboratively on the research effort.

Harnessing lasers

Friday, October 11, 2013

Nanotechnology Now reported that Weidong Zhou, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, has received a new National Science Foundation grant in his effort to harness the power of lasers on silicon chips to increase capacity and speed in computing and communications systems.

NASA fellowship awarded

Friday, October 11, 2013

Hispanic Business.com reported that Ezgihan Baydar, UT Arlington aerospace engineering student, and her adviser, Frank Lu, professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, were awarded a three-year NASA fellowship that provides $135,000 in funding and includes summer internships at the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

Building better batteries

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Two UT Arlington engineering faculty members have won a $152,077 Office of Naval Research grant to study the thermal properties of lithium-ion batteries and devise better designs for cooling and operating them safely on Navy ships and planes, Phys.org reported. David Wetz, electrical engineering assistant professor, and Ankur Jain, aerospace and mechanical engineering assistant professor, are working collaboratively on the research effort.

Funding for computer engineering

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Hispanic Business.com reported that Weidong Zhou, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, has received a new National Science Foundation grant in his work to harness the power of lasers on silicon chips to increase capacity and speed in computing and communications systems.

Addressing industry leaders

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

The Houston Chronicle and the San Antonio Express-News noted that Rick Lynch, executive director of the UT Arlington Research Institute, will be a keynote speaker at the Robotics Alley Conference and Expo in Minneapolis, Minn next month. The conference will bring together leaders in robotics research, design, business development, law, government and policy and investment banking to share insights into worldwide growth of robotics and autonomous systems.

Researchers successfully test model for implant device reactions

Monday, October 7, 2013

A team from The University of Texas at Arlington has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters, and artificial joints, Surgical Products magazine reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together on a way to predict foreign body reactions in medical settings.

New technology to aid drug development, disease diagnosis

Friday, October 4, 2013

A team of scientists from UT Arlington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has figured out how to quantitatively observe cellular processes taking place on so-called “lab on a chip” devices in a silicon environment, R&D Magazine reported. The new technology will be useful in drug development as well as disease diagnosis, say researchers, which include Samarendra Mohanty, assistant professor of physics and head of the UT Arlington Biophysics and Physiology Lab. Additional co-authors include Bipin Joshi and Nelson Cardenas, also of UT Arlington.

Doctoral aerospace engineering student earns NASA fellowship

Thursday, October 3, 2013

A UT Arlington aerospace engineering student has been awarded a prestigious NASA Harriet G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship that will allow her to pursue her research into efficient jet engines in conjunction with the space agency, Space Ref reported. Ezgihan Baydar and her adviser, Frank Lu, professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, were awarded the three-year fellowship that provides $135,000 in funding and includes summer internships at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

Physics assistant professor part of cellular breakthrough

Thursday, October 3, 2013

A team of scientists from UT Arlington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has figured out how to quantitatively observe cellular processes taking place on so-called “lab on a chip” devices in a silicon environment, Hispanic Businesses.com, Science Daily, Nanotechnology Now and numerous other media reported. The new technology will be useful in drug development as well as disease diagnosis, say researchers, which include Samarendra Mohanty, assistant professor of physics and head of the UTA Biophysics and Physiology Lab. Additional co-authors include Bipin Joshi and Nelson Cardenas of UTA.

September

A mathematical solution

Friday, September 27, 2013

A team from The University of Texas at Arlington has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints, News Medical and Product, Design & Development reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together on a way to predict foreign-body reactions in medical settings.

A formula to predict medical reactions

Thursday, September 26, 2013

A UT Arlington team has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints, BioNews Texas, Fierce Health Hit, Medical Xpress and Medical News Today reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together to develop a way to predict foreign-body reactions in medical settings.

A formula to predict medical reactions

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

A UT Arlington team has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints, Science Daily, Red Orbit, Science Newsline, MDT and other websites reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together on a way to predict foreign-body reactions in medical settings.

Smarter rehab, improved patient outcomes

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

A UT Arlington multidisciplinary team will lead a three-year, $1 million National Science Foundation grant project to develop iRehab, a smart rehabilitation system that can adapt and personalize therapy programs based on a patient's needs and constraints, Phys.org reported. Fillia Makedon, a Jenkins-Garrett distinguished professor and chair of the Computer Science and Engineering Department, will lead the research effort, which partners UT Arlington with Boston University and Harvard's Massachusetts General Hospital. The UT Arlington team includes Heng Huang and Vassilis Athitsos, both associate professors of computer science and engineering; Robert Gatchel, psychology professor; and Mario Romero-Ortega, associate professor of bioengineering.

Studying heart disease at cellular level

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering Kytai Nguyen is working through an American Heart Association grant on a new method that could use injected nanoparticles to recruit stem cells from the  patient's own blood to build needed stents in that patient's failing blood vessels, Phys.org reported.

Alum making news

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

The parent company of the Mercury News has agreed to sell the paper's headquarters to Super Micro Computer, which will eventually convert the site to manufacturing space, the Mercury News, Inside Bay Area and Contra Costa Times reported. Super Micro president/CEO/board chairman Charles Liang received his master's in electrical engineering from UT Arlington. Super Micro is a computer manufacturer.

Treating peripheral artery disease

Monday, September 23, 2013

Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington bioengineering associate professor, is working to develop ways to more effectively treat peripheral artery disease, a malady that affects about 8 million Americans, eZanga, the Hispanic Business Journal and Nanowerk reported. Her American Heart Association grant is studying a new method that could use injected nanoparticles to recruit stem cells from the patient's blood to build stents in that patient's failing blood vessels.

Shoring up roads

Monday, September 16, 2013

A UT Arlington program of shoring up failing highway slopes using recycled plastic pins is extending the lives of those roadways, CBS 11 KTVT reported. Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, is leading the research and work effort with a $1 million grant from the Texas Department of Transportation.

Making roads stronger

Friday, September 13, 2013

The Atlantic published an article about Sahadat Hossain, an associate professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington and the man behind a new state program to shore up crumbling roads using an underground support system of recycled plastic pins. With a million-dollar grant from the state department of transportation, Hossain is now beginning to implement the plastic pin solution on two other Texas Highways, Routes 183 and 360. "Eventually, the idea is going to catch on internationally," he says. "I'm confident."

UT Arlington recognized for diversity

Thursday, September 12, 2013

The University of Texas at Arlington has been recognized nationally for the diversity of its campus, KXAS/NBC 5 noted. In its recent college rankings, U.S. News & World Report put UT Arlington fifth in the nation for ethnically diverse campuses. The rank was up from seventh last year.

Sensors going global

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Two UT Arlington environmental engineers are adapting a sensor system they have developed to boost methane production in landfills to create an alternative energy source in Ghana, the website Azosensors reported. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, both associate professors of civil engineering, have won a $100,000 grant through the Environmental Protection Agency’s Global Methane Initiative.

Creating an alternate energy source

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Two UT Arlington environmental engineers are adapting a sensor system they have developed to boost methane production in landfills to create an alternative energy source in Ghana, according to Phys.org. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, both associate professors of civil engineering, have won a $100,000 grant through the Environmental Protection Agency's Global Methane Initiative. The UT Arlington team also recently was awarded a $300,000 contract with the Dallas-based CP&Y engineering firm to help boost methane production in the Corpus Christi landfill system.

Teaming for technology

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Sellmark Corp. of Mansfield is partnering with the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute (UTARI) with the goal of creating new technology for outdoor lifestyle products for consumers, according to the Fort Worth Business Press. The collaboration will allow students and leading faculty researchers to perform Sellmark-funded research to create and improve existing products, as well as commercialize new technologies.

A fix for shifting soils

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

KENS/ CBS 5 (San Antonio) featured a report on a UT Arlington researcher who is using hundreds of 10-foot "pins" made from recycled plastic to stop a problem called "slope failure" that occurs near highways throughout Texas. The idea originated elsewhere, but Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, and his team re-designed how the pins are deployed, making them effective even in the notoriously shifting soils of Texas. The story originally aired on WFAA/ABC 8.

Stopping soil from shifting

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, was featured in a WFAA/ABC 8 report on his research into using hundreds of 10-foot "pins" made from recycled plastic to stop a problem called "slope failure" that occurs alongside highways throughout Texas.  The idea originated elsewhere, but Hossain and his team re-designed how the pins are deployed, making them effective even in the notoriously shifting soils of Texas. The Texas Department of recently awarded him a million dollar grant to replicate the idea. The North Dallas Gazette also featured a story on the grant project.

Structural Engineering Institute welcomes UTA graduate student chapter

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

This year, the Structural Engineering Institute welcomed the formation of its first three Graduate Student Chapters: Virginia Tech, the University of West Virginia, and The University of Texas at Arlington, the industry publication Structure reported. Istiaque Hasan chairs the UT Arlington chapter and the chapter’s faculty advisor is Nur Yazdani, professor civil engineering.

August

Materials genome planned

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Phys.org reported that UT Arlington engineers are assembling a computer-based "genome" that will aid in the design and development of advanced new materials that are super hard, can resist extreme heat, are highly durable and are less expensive through a new, $640,000 National Science Foundation grant.

Severe heat could have impacted broken pipeline

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

North Texas' recent spate of heat and the ever expanding and contracting soil that results from that heat could have been part of the problem that ruptured a major water line in Grand Prairie yesterday, said Anand Puppala, UT Arlington associate dean for research in the College of Engineering in a Dallas Morning News story. “They swell and they shrink and infrastructure moves when the soil starts shifting. They cause heavy cracking to foundations, roads, pipelines. Look at the highways, at the cracking and the dips and valleys. Some of these soils can be pretty hard to deal with.” Grand Prairie water crews worked round the clock to mend the pipeline.

Design Week blog commends UT Arlington Research Institute's robotics

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

A Design Week blog said that the UT Arlington Research Institute's robotic display was intriguing in the number of facial expressions it's robot displayed. The Institute's demonstration is part of ongoing research that uses robots to work with children who have autism. The demonstration was part of National Instruments Week, a learning conference that connects beginners with expert users for hands-on technical sessions, case study presentations and panel discussions on the latest advancements in design, control, automation, manufacturing and testing.

Civil engineering professor discusses pipe defects

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Since at least 2006, ExxonMobil has known that its 1940s-era Pegasus pipeline had many manufacturing defects, the Arkansas Times reported. Mohammad Najafi, a pipeline construction expert and UT Arlington civil engineering professor, said ExxonMobil was not careful. "I'm looking at this from a distance ... but they were not very careful. They should have been more concerned about the pipe." Najafi reviewed the pipeline's metallurgical report and hydrostatic test results.

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