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In the News 2013 News & Events

Engineering in the News 2013

December

A new way to spot storms

Thursday, December 19, 2013

The newest CASA radar unit, installed Tuesday in Midlothian, could be the first of several new low-level radars that will provide Dallas-Fort Worth with a detailed look at developing thunderstorms and tornadoes this spring, KDFW Fox 4 reported. The first CASA radar unit installed in North Texas was at UT Arlington, Fox 4's Chief Meteorologist Dan Henry said.

Inventors honored

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Four University of Texas at Arlington faculty members and senior administrators have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, Phys.org and Bio-News Texas reported. They are Frank Lewis, electrical engineering professor and a University Distinguished Scholar Professor; Carolyn Cason, a nursing professor and vice president for research; Ron Elsenbaumer, professor of chemistry and biochemistry and provost and vice president for academic affairs; and UT Arlington President Vistasp M. Karbhari, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of civil and environmental engineering.

New radar debuts

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

The newest CASA radar unit, installed Tuesday in Midlothian, could be one of several new low-level radars that will provide Dallas-Fort Worth with a detailed look at developing thunderstorms and tornadoes this spring, The Dallas Morning News reported. The first CASA radar unit installed in North Texas is at UT Arlington, the article said. Business Week and several other websites reported the installation of the Midlothian unit.

Visualizing cell phone signals

Friday, December 13, 2013

Ian Kersey has created a new image on iconic American locales by visualizing the millions of cell phone signals emanating from those areas, Thought Catalog reported. Kersey verified his artistic photographs with electrical engineers from across the country including J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor.

Improving public transportation

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Stephen Mattingly, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, will investigate how advanced technologies can improve public transportation and alternative transportation modes as part of a national initiative aimed at developing more "livable communities," Phys.org and Ahead of the Curve reported.

Chiao mentioned in article about cell phone signals visualized

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Ian Kersey put a new image on iconic American locales by visualizing the millions of cell phone signals emanating from those areas, BigMicrow and Into Mobile reported. Kersey verified his artsy photographs with electrical engineers from across the country including J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor.

Personalizing care

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant engineering professor, Shouyi Wang, has developed a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient's personalized medical information, The Almagest reported. Wang is in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering. His paper "Online Seizure Prediction Using an Adaptive Learning Approach" was published in IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.

Predicting an epileptic seizure

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant engineering professor has developed a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient's personalized medical information, according to the website Medical News Today. The research conducted by Shouyi Wang, an assistant professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, has been in the paper "Online Seizure Prediction Using an Adaptive Learning Approach" in IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.

High speed rail

Monday, December 2, 2013

KTVT/CBS 11 reported on a UT Arlington feasibility study of high-speed rail in Texas. The study shows that trips between most city pairs that use existing Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) right-of-way can be made in less than two hours. Steve Mattingly, a UT Arlington civil engineer who conducted the case study, evaluated routes between Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston and several others.

Artistic endeavor

Monday, December 2, 2013

Jacky Sylvie, special programs coordinator for the UT Arlington College of Engineering, was profiled in The Dallas Morning News. The story focused on her background and artistic endeavor – a line of jewelry made from vinyl records called Hi-Fi Jewelry.

November

High speed rail study noted

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

A UT Arlington feasibility study of high-speed rail in Texas shows that trips between most city pairs that use existing Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) right-of-way can be made in less than two hours, making it competitive with air travel and superior to highway driving, the website Railway Track & Structures said. Steve Mattingly, a UT Arlington civil engineer who conducted the case study, evaluated routes between Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston and several others. The Dallas Observer also featured a blog post on the study.

Mining tool for e-health records

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Recent National Science Foundation grants to UT Arlington, SMU and UT Southwestern to develop mining tools for electronic health records were mentioned in a FierceHealthIT story about using records to link genetic variants and diseases.

Envisioning a bullet train

Monday, November 25, 2013

One of the cheapest and most effective ways to build high-speed rail in Texas could be to place the tracks right on top of highway right-of-way, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram said in a story on a new study led by Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering professor. The study adds fuel for thought as passenger rail advocates work on a plan to build a bullet train service connecting Dallas-Fort Worth to Houston, possibly by 2021. “I’m really pleased at the times that were achievable,” said Mattingly.

Health predictions studied

Monday, November 25, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant engineering professor has developed a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient's personalized medical information, according to the website Science Daily and e!Science News. The research conducted by Shouyi Wang, an assistant professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, was published under the title "Online Seizure Prediction Using an Adaptive Learning Approach" in IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.


A model for health

Friday, November 22, 2013

News Medical reported on research by Shouyi Wang, a UT Arlington assistant professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering, developing a computational model that can more accurately predict when an epileptic seizure will occur next based on the patient’s personalized medical information. Smart Economy, e! Science News and Phys.org also featured the research.

Data needs to be private but available for analysis

Thursday, November 21, 2013

EMR & HIPAA.com noted research by UT Arlington in a story about doctors compromising patient privacy. The piece acknowledged that plenty of work is underway to improve EMR technology, adding: "For example, at UT Arlington, researchers are leading a National Science Foundation project to keep healthcare data secure while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis. They hope to produce groundbreaking algorithms and tools for identifying privacy leaks."

American Heart Association honors Nguyen

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, has been named an American Heart Association fellow, an honor conferred by the national organization’s Council on Basic Cardiovascular Sciences, Hispanic Business.com and Phys.org reported. Nguyen specializes in cellular engineering. Her research also involves tissue engineering, drug delivery and stem cell therapies.

Professors' research work noted

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Two University of Texas at Arlington scientists working on innovative energy supply solutions are included in the first round of grants for the National Science Foundation’s new Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering and Materials program, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. Chemistry professor Fred MacDonnell and Norma Tacconi, a recently retired research associate professor, were awarded a three-year, $430,346 grant to study a new method for converting carbon dioxide to methanol. Qiming Zhang, a physics professor, was awarded a three-year, $188,548 grant to study the use of sulfurized hematite to build more efficient solar cell technologies. Also, Samarendra Mohanty, assistant professor of physics, will receive a total of $384,269 over the next two years from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. His work involves using a near-infrared ultrafast laser beam to deliver genes that allow expression of light-sensitive proteins, called opsins, in specific cells.

Armstrong recognized

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Dallas Business Journal recognized University of Texas at Arlington Professor Daniel Armstrong as an innovative leader in the fields of separations and mass spectrometry. He is No. 16 on a recent list of the most influential people in analytical sciences published by The Analytical Scientist magazine. Armstrong is UT Arlington’s Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry.

Students awarded EPA research fellowships

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Water & Wastes Digest reported on the more than $1.65 million in research fellowships that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded to 33 students at various schools including UT Arlington. All of the undergraduates are pursuing degrees in environmental science and related fields. The fellowships were given through the EPA’s Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) Fellowship program.

Organizing complexity

Monday, November 18, 2013

Li Zeng, a UT Arlington assistant professor of Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering, has received a $142,223 National Science Foundation grant to develop a mathematical method of ensuring for consistency in various manufacturing processes that produce complex data, News Fix (Toronto) reported.

NIH grant to fuel research

Friday, November 15, 2013

A UT Arlington assistant professor of physics has received a $384,000 National Institutes of Health grant to explore a better method for initiating certain gene therapies that could help fight retinitis pigmentosa, a vision-deteriorating disease, D Magazine’s Healthcare Daily reported. Samarendra Mohanty will receive the money over the next two years from the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. His work involves using a near-infrared ultrafast laser beam to deliver genes that allow expression of light-sensitive proteins in specific cells.

Zeno robot to assist with research

Friday, November 15, 2013

UT Arlington is among 30 universities across the world that have programmed Zeno R50, a robot that can interact with people via voice and facial expressions, to assist with research, the Dallas Business Journal reported. The company that created the walking, talking robots is in the last few weeks of a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for its technology.

Civil engineer concerned about pipeline risks

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The Dallas Observer interviewed Mohammad Najafi, director of the Center for Underground Infrastructure Research at UT Arlington, for its story about the Keystone pipeline. In a matter of weeks, crude oil will begin flowing through the Gulf Coast portion of the pipeline in Texas, but a watchdog group questions the integrity of the project and wonders whether it is ready to operate. “The number of potential issues that are raised, and the quality control problems concern me as well,” Najafi said.

Defense challenges

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, who now heads the UT Arlington Research Institute, was interviewed for a TMCNet.com article about new challenges reshaping national defense technology.

Guarding medical data

Monday, November 11, 2013

The work of two UT Arlington computer science and engineering professors to protect sensitive electronic medical data was featured in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram business column. Heng Huang and Guatam Das, through a $740,000 National Science Foundation project, have developed a computational model that will guard private information while still allowing the medical data to be used.

Ensuring privacy in e-health records

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Two UT Arlington researchers are leading a collaborative National Science Foundation project to protect personal, electronic healthcare data while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis and improved health care, ECN.com reported. Associate Professor Heng Huang and Professor Gautam Das, both of the UT Arlington Computer Science & Engineering Department, have teamed to develop the new computational model that will de-identify information in electronic health records.

Protecting data

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Two UT Arlington researchers are leading a collaborative National Science Foundation project to protect personal, electronic healthcare data while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis and improved health care, Phys.org reported. Associate Professor Heng Huang and Professor Gautam Das, both of the UT Arlington Computer Science & Engineering Department, have teamed to develop the new computational model that will de-identify information in electronic health records.

Computer science team developing system to ensure privacy in electronic health records

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Two UT Arlington researchers are leading a collaborative National Science Foundation project to protect personal, electronic healthcare data while ensuring that the anonymous records can be used for secondary analysis and improved health care, 10 Gigabit Ethernet and TMCnet.com reported. Associate Professor Heng Huang and Professor Guatam Das, both of the UT Arlington Computer Science & Engineering Department, are leading the effort.

Flooding prediction

Monday, November 4, 2013

A network of faster and more precise storm detection radar units is expected to provide up to 20 minutes of additional warning time when the spring storm season flares up in Dallas-Fort Worth, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. At UT Arlington, the civil engineering department will use data collected by the network to analyze flash flooding in urban environments. “This is where hydrology meets meteorology,” associate professor D.J. Seo has said.

Student recognized as engineering leader of tomorrow

Friday, November 1, 2013

UT Arlington's Yayu "Monica" Hew, an aerospace engineering and physics student, was among the award winners in Penton's Aviation Week's "Tomorrow's Engineering Leaders: The Twenty20s," WAND Channel 17 in Decatur, Ill., Fresh News, WAFB in Phoenix, Az., WCIV 4 in Charleston, S.C., and many other media outlets reported. The awards, produced in partnership with Raytheon, recognize top engineering, math, science and technology students.

October

Tracking medical records

Thursday, October 31, 2013

The National Science Foundation has awarded three collaborative grants amounting to $892,587 to The University of Texas at Arlington, Southern Methodist University and the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center at Dallas to develop data mining tools for electronic health records, Clinical Innovation.com reported. Electronic medical record data mining is increasingly being recognized as a potential bonanza for conducting identifying high-risk patients and helping improve healthcare.

Mining medical e-records

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

The National Science Foundation has awarded three collaborative grants amounting to $892,587 to The University of Texas at Arlington, Southern Methodist University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas to develop data mining tools for electronic health records, FierceEMR.com reported. Electronic medical record data mining is increasingly being recognized as a potential bonanza for identifying high-risk patients and helping improve healthcare.

Mining health records

Thursday, October 24, 2013

A UT Arlington computer scientist is leading a new, National Science Foundation project to mine electronic medical records data to help physicians personalize patient treatment, predict health care needs and identify risks that can lead to readmission, TMCnet reported. Heng Huang, an associate professor of the Computer Science & Engineering Department, is the principal investigator on a $461,098 grant titled “Robust Large-Scale Electronic Medical Record Data Mining Framework to Conduct Risk Stratification for Personalized Intervention.”

Moving innovation forward

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

The University of Texas at Arlington and TechFW, a Fort Worth-based technology startup initiative, have agreed to a multi-year partnership to commercialize University research and move innovation to the marketplace, according to Yahoo! NewsReutersBloomberg BusinessWeek and the Austin Business Journal. TechFW@UTA will offer training and educational programs to UT Arlington faculty, staff and students. UT Arlington faculty members and research teams will gain access to the North Texas entrepreneurial community through the TechFW network.

Efficient jet engines

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

UT Arlington aerospace engineering student Ezgihan (Izzy) Baydar has been awarded a NASA Harriet G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship that will allow her to pursue her research into efficient jet engines in conjunction with the space agency, according to the Fort Worth Business Press. Baydar and her adviser, Frank Lu, professor in the mechanical and aerospace engineering department, were awarded the three-year fellowship, which provides $135,000 in funding and includes summer internships at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

Engineers' battery research showcased

Monday, October 14, 2013

Two UT Arlington engineering faculty members have won a $152,077 Office of Naval Research grant to study the thermal properties of lithium-ion batteries and devise better designs for cooling and operating them safely on Navy ships and planes, the website Smart Energy Universe reported. David Wetz, electrical engineering assistant professor, and Ankur Jain, aerospace and mechanical engineering assistant professor, are working collaboratively on the research effort.

New Naval Research grant

Friday, October 11, 2013

Two UT Arlington engineering faculty members have won a $152,077 Office of Naval Research grant to study the thermal properties of lithium-ion batteries and devise better designs for cooling and operating them safely on Navy ships and planes, ECN magazine reported. David Wetz, electrical engineering assistant professor, and Ankur Jain, aerospace and mechanical engineering assistant professor, are working collaboratively on the research effort.

Harnessing lasers

Friday, October 11, 2013

Nanotechnology Now reported that Weidong Zhou, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, has received a new National Science Foundation grant in his effort to harness the power of lasers on silicon chips to increase capacity and speed in computing and communications systems.

NASA fellowship awarded

Friday, October 11, 2013

Hispanic Business.com reported that Ezgihan Baydar, UT Arlington aerospace engineering student, and her adviser, Frank Lu, professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, were awarded a three-year NASA fellowship that provides $135,000 in funding and includes summer internships at the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

Building better batteries

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Two UT Arlington engineering faculty members have won a $152,077 Office of Naval Research grant to study the thermal properties of lithium-ion batteries and devise better designs for cooling and operating them safely on Navy ships and planes, Phys.org reported. David Wetz, electrical engineering assistant professor, and Ankur Jain, aerospace and mechanical engineering assistant professor, are working collaboratively on the research effort.

Funding for computer engineering

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Hispanic Business.com reported that Weidong Zhou, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, has received a new National Science Foundation grant in his work to harness the power of lasers on silicon chips to increase capacity and speed in computing and communications systems.

Addressing industry leaders

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

The Houston Chronicle and the San Antonio Express-News noted that Rick Lynch, executive director of the UT Arlington Research Institute, will be a keynote speaker at the Robotics Alley Conference and Expo in Minneapolis, Minn next month. The conference will bring together leaders in robotics research, design, business development, law, government and policy and investment banking to share insights into worldwide growth of robotics and autonomous systems.

Researchers successfully test model for implant device reactions

Monday, October 7, 2013

A team from The University of Texas at Arlington has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters, and artificial joints, Surgical Products magazine reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together on a way to predict foreign body reactions in medical settings.

New technology to aid drug development, disease diagnosis

Friday, October 4, 2013

A team of scientists from UT Arlington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has figured out how to quantitatively observe cellular processes taking place on so-called “lab on a chip” devices in a silicon environment, R&D Magazine reported. The new technology will be useful in drug development as well as disease diagnosis, say researchers, which include Samarendra Mohanty, assistant professor of physics and head of the UT Arlington Biophysics and Physiology Lab. Additional co-authors include Bipin Joshi and Nelson Cardenas, also of UT Arlington.

Doctoral aerospace engineering student earns NASA fellowship

Thursday, October 3, 2013

A UT Arlington aerospace engineering student has been awarded a prestigious NASA Harriet G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship that will allow her to pursue her research into efficient jet engines in conjunction with the space agency, Space Ref reported. Ezgihan Baydar and her adviser, Frank Lu, professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, were awarded the three-year fellowship that provides $135,000 in funding and includes summer internships at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

Physics assistant professor part of cellular breakthrough

Thursday, October 3, 2013

A team of scientists from UT Arlington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has figured out how to quantitatively observe cellular processes taking place on so-called “lab on a chip” devices in a silicon environment, Hispanic Businesses.com, Science Daily, Nanotechnology Now and numerous other media reported. The new technology will be useful in drug development as well as disease diagnosis, say researchers, which include Samarendra Mohanty, assistant professor of physics and head of the UTA Biophysics and Physiology Lab. Additional co-authors include Bipin Joshi and Nelson Cardenas of UTA.

September

A mathematical solution

Friday, September 27, 2013

A team from The University of Texas at Arlington has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints, News Medical and Product, Design & Development reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together on a way to predict foreign-body reactions in medical settings.

A formula to predict medical reactions

Thursday, September 26, 2013

A UT Arlington team has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints, BioNews Texas, Fierce Health Hit, Medical Xpress and Medical News Today reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together to develop a way to predict foreign-body reactions in medical settings.

A formula to predict medical reactions

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

A UT Arlington team has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints, Science Daily, Red Orbit, Science Newsline, MDT and other websites reported. Liping Tang, professor of bioengineering in the UT Arlington College of Engineering, and Jianzhong Su, chairman and professor in the UT Arlington College of Science’s mathematics department, are working together on a way to predict foreign-body reactions in medical settings.

Smarter rehab, improved patient outcomes

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

A UT Arlington multidisciplinary team will lead a three-year, $1 million National Science Foundation grant project to develop iRehab, a smart rehabilitation system that can adapt and personalize therapy programs based on a patient's needs and constraints, Phys.org reported. Fillia Makedon, a Jenkins-Garrett distinguished professor and chair of the Computer Science and Engineering Department, will lead the research effort, which partners UT Arlington with Boston University and Harvard's Massachusetts General Hospital. The UT Arlington team includes Heng Huang and Vassilis Athitsos, both associate professors of computer science and engineering; Robert Gatchel, psychology professor; and Mario Romero-Ortega, associate professor of bioengineering.

Studying heart disease at cellular level

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering Kytai Nguyen is working through an American Heart Association grant on a new method that could use injected nanoparticles to recruit stem cells from the  patient's own blood to build needed stents in that patient's failing blood vessels, Phys.org reported.

Alum making news

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

The parent company of the Mercury News has agreed to sell the paper's headquarters to Super Micro Computer, which will eventually convert the site to manufacturing space, the Mercury News, Inside Bay Area and Contra Costa Times reported. Super Micro president/CEO/board chairman Charles Liang received his master's in electrical engineering from UT Arlington. Super Micro is a computer manufacturer.

Treating peripheral artery disease

Monday, September 23, 2013

Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington bioengineering associate professor, is working to develop ways to more effectively treat peripheral artery disease, a malady that affects about 8 million Americans, eZanga, the Hispanic Business Journal and Nanowerk reported. Her American Heart Association grant is studying a new method that could use injected nanoparticles to recruit stem cells from the patient's blood to build stents in that patient's failing blood vessels.

Shoring up roads

Monday, September 16, 2013

A UT Arlington program of shoring up failing highway slopes using recycled plastic pins is extending the lives of those roadways, CBS 11 KTVT reported. Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, is leading the research and work effort with a $1 million grant from the Texas Department of Transportation.

Making roads stronger

Friday, September 13, 2013

The Atlantic published an article about Sahadat Hossain, an associate professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington and the man behind a new state program to shore up crumbling roads using an underground support system of recycled plastic pins. With a million-dollar grant from the state department of transportation, Hossain is now beginning to implement the plastic pin solution on two other Texas Highways, Routes 183 and 360. "Eventually, the idea is going to catch on internationally," he says. "I'm confident."

UT Arlington recognized for diversity

Thursday, September 12, 2013

The University of Texas at Arlington has been recognized nationally for the diversity of its campus, KXAS/NBC 5 noted. In its recent college rankings, U.S. News & World Report put UT Arlington fifth in the nation for ethnically diverse campuses. The rank was up from seventh last year.

Sensors going global

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Two UT Arlington environmental engineers are adapting a sensor system they have developed to boost methane production in landfills to create an alternative energy source in Ghana, the website Azosensors reported. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, both associate professors of civil engineering, have won a $100,000 grant through the Environmental Protection Agency’s Global Methane Initiative.

Creating an alternate energy source

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Two UT Arlington environmental engineers are adapting a sensor system they have developed to boost methane production in landfills to create an alternative energy source in Ghana, according to Phys.org. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, both associate professors of civil engineering, have won a $100,000 grant through the Environmental Protection Agency's Global Methane Initiative. The UT Arlington team also recently was awarded a $300,000 contract with the Dallas-based CP&Y engineering firm to help boost methane production in the Corpus Christi landfill system.

Teaming for technology

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Sellmark Corp. of Mansfield is partnering with the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute (UTARI) with the goal of creating new technology for outdoor lifestyle products for consumers, according to the Fort Worth Business Press. The collaboration will allow students and leading faculty researchers to perform Sellmark-funded research to create and improve existing products, as well as commercialize new technologies.

A fix for shifting soils

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

KENS/ CBS 5 (San Antonio) featured a report on a UT Arlington researcher who is using hundreds of 10-foot "pins" made from recycled plastic to stop a problem called "slope failure" that occurs near highways throughout Texas. The idea originated elsewhere, but Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, and his team re-designed how the pins are deployed, making them effective even in the notoriously shifting soils of Texas. The story originally aired on WFAA/ABC 8.

Stopping soil from shifting

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, was featured in a WFAA/ABC 8 report on his research into using hundreds of 10-foot "pins" made from recycled plastic to stop a problem called "slope failure" that occurs alongside highways throughout Texas.  The idea originated elsewhere, but Hossain and his team re-designed how the pins are deployed, making them effective even in the notoriously shifting soils of Texas. The Texas Department of recently awarded him a million dollar grant to replicate the idea. The North Dallas Gazette also featured a story on the grant project.

Structural Engineering Institute welcomes UTA graduate student chapter

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

This year, the Structural Engineering Institute welcomed the formation of its first three Graduate Student Chapters: Virginia Tech, the University of West Virginia, and The University of Texas at Arlington, the industry publication Structure reported. Istiaque Hasan chairs the UT Arlington chapter and the chapter’s faculty advisor is Nur Yazdani, professor civil engineering.

August

Materials genome planned

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Phys.org reported that UT Arlington engineers are assembling a computer-based "genome" that will aid in the design and development of advanced new materials that are super hard, can resist extreme heat, are highly durable and are less expensive through a new, $640,000 National Science Foundation grant.

Severe heat could have impacted broken pipeline

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

North Texas' recent spate of heat and the ever expanding and contracting soil that results from that heat could have been part of the problem that ruptured a major water line in Grand Prairie yesterday, said Anand Puppala, UT Arlington associate dean for research in the College of Engineering in a Dallas Morning News story. “They swell and they shrink and infrastructure moves when the soil starts shifting. They cause heavy cracking to foundations, roads, pipelines. Look at the highways, at the cracking and the dips and valleys. Some of these soils can be pretty hard to deal with.” Grand Prairie water crews worked round the clock to mend the pipeline.

Design Week blog commends UT Arlington Research Institute's robotics

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

A Design Week blog said that the UT Arlington Research Institute's robotic display was intriguing in the number of facial expressions it's robot displayed. The Institute's demonstration is part of ongoing research that uses robots to work with children who have autism. The demonstration was part of National Instruments Week, a learning conference that connects beginners with expert users for hands-on technical sessions, case study presentations and panel discussions on the latest advancements in design, control, automation, manufacturing and testing.

Civil engineering professor discusses pipe defects

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Since at least 2006, ExxonMobil has known that its 1940s-era Pegasus pipeline had many manufacturing defects, the Arkansas Times reported. Mohammad Najafi, a pipeline construction expert and UT Arlington civil engineering professor, said ExxonMobil was not careful. "I'm looking at this from a distance ... but they were not very careful. They should have been more concerned about the pipe." Najafi reviewed the pipeline's metallurgical report and hydrostatic test results.

July

Graduate success

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Narus, Inc., a leader in big data analytics for cybersecurity solutions, has named UT Arlington graduate Shirish Andhare the general manager of Narus' India operations, StockWatch, Bloomberg Businessweek and several other websites said. Anhare received his master’s in computer engineering from UT Arlington.

Collaboration for innovation

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

A paper recently presented at the 2013 ASME International Technical Conference and Exhibition on Packaging and Integration of Electronic and Photonic Microsystems, aka InterPACK 2013, details a new project involving UT Arlington and Dallas-based Mestex, Digital Producer Magazine reported. The goal of the collaboration is to improve the efficiency of indirect evaporative cooling for data centers.

Race day for engineers

Monday, July 22, 2013

WFAA/ABC 8’s Good Morning Texas featured interviews with Bob Woods, UT Arlington professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and students Naima Rivas and J.P. Merkel on Friday about the Formula SAE car the students helped build and the 13th Annual Texas Autocross Rally held last weekend on the UT Arlington campus. The event featured teams from 10 universities and UT Arlington. WBAP/820AM 96.7FM and KLIF/570AM also previewed the competition.

KERA/90.1 FM featured a story on the design characteristics of this year’s Formula SAE car built by UT Arlington engineering students in advance of this weekend's Texas Autocross Rally. The car has computerized “wings” to improve aerodynamic performance. “The computer calculates the best aerodynamic distribution for the car, and it’ll change all the wings and change the angle of attacks and what not, to try and balance out the car,” UT Arlington student J.P. Merkel said.

Najafi quoted on ExxonMobil pipeline rupture

Thursday, July 18, 2013

The Arkansas Times and FuelFix.com quoted Mohammad Najafi, UT Arlington civil engineering professor and pipeline construction expert, in a story about a ruptured ExxonMobil pipeline that caused an oil spill in Arkansas earlier this year. “With proper inspection and maintenance, these catastrophic events can be prevented,” Najafi said. The story initially appeared in Inside Climate News.org.

Businessweek story on ExxonMobil pipeline rupture quotes Najafi

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Bloomberg Businessweek quoted Mohammad Najafi, UT Arlington civil engineering professor and pipeline construction expert, in a story about a ruptured ExxonMobil pipeline that caused an oil spill in Arkansas earlier this year. “With proper inspection and maintenance, these catastrophic events can be prevented,” Najafi said. The story initially appeared in Inside Climate News.org.

Kruzic working with Tarrant Regional Water District to fight zebra mussels

Monday, July 15, 2013

The Tarrant Regional Water District is working with Andrew Kruzic, UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, to figure out the best ways to keep the water moving in a 150-mile pipeline near Fort Worth that has become infested by zebra mussels, algae and other native troublemakers, The Dallas Morning News reported. “The district has an invasive species study, and chloramine was identified as the best option for the control of zebra mussels in the district’s facilities,” Kruzic said. The story also quoted Robert McMahon, UT Arlington professor emeritus of biology and an expert on zebra mussels.

International student enrollment

Friday, July 12, 2013

A National Foundation for American Policy report says that international student enrollment plays a critical role in sustaining quality science, technology, engineering and math graduate programs in U.S. universities, Inside Higher Ed reported. The report showed that 93 percent of UT Arlington's electrical engineering graduate students are international. “To some extent this reflects some of what’s going on in our society within the U.S. in terms of trying to push for more interest in STEM fields,” said Jonathan Bredow, professor and chair of the electrical engineering department at UT Arlington.

Seo to design prototype that predicts flash flooding

Thursday, July 11, 2013

CENews.com reported that UT Arlington Associate Civil Engineering Professor D.J. Seo is designing a first-of-its-kind prototype that predicts flash flooding. “The prototype will provide timely and location-specific information of what’s happening currently and in the immediate future when flash flooding occurs,” Seo said.

June

Judging pipeline anomalies

Monday, June 10, 2013

Mohammad Najafi, a civil engineering professor at The University of Texas at Arlington and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Pipeline Systems Engineering and Practice, was quoted in a story on the website Grist about the Keystone XL pipeline and the identification of “anomalies” in parts of what has been built. “That’s not a good sign … it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s dangerous, but it means [TransCanada] may have missed something,” Najafi said of the frequency of anomalies.

Mohanty's research featured in Machines Like Us

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

A new tool being developed by a UT Arlington assistant professor of physics could help scientists map and track the interactions between neurons inside different areas of the brain, Machines Like Us reported. The journal Optics Letters recently published a paper by Samarendra Mohanty on the development of a fiber-optic, two-photon, optogenetic stimulator and its use on human cells in a laboratory. The tiny tool builds on Mohanty’s previous discovery that near-infrared light can be used to stimulate a light-sensitive protein introduced into living cells and neurons in the brain. This new method could show how different parts of the brain react when a linked area is stimulated.

LaserFocusWorld highlights UT Arlington-University of Portland research on ocean fish camouflage

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

LaserFocusWorld reported that researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Portland have found that certain ocean fish camouflage themselves with a polarization-dependent reflective outer surface that changes properties to match polarization conditions ("polaro-crypsis").The research was funded by the U.S. Navy, which has an interest both in developing better ocean camouflage technologies and in being able to detect such strategies if developed by others.

Makeev research on composites for aircraft highlighted by Office of Naval Research

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

The Office of Naval Research's Breakthrough Technologies newsletter featured research that UT Arlington's Andrew Makeev has done on composites for aircraft. Makeev, an associate professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, is developing diagnostic and predictive tools that can aid aircraft manufacturers in analyzing composite structures used to make aircraft safer, faster and more reliable. His research is funding through a $558,427 grant from the Office of Naval Research. The article on Makeev's work starts on page 32.

May

Behbehani appointed dean of College of Engineering

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

The Fort Worth Business Press and Dallas Business Journal Executive People on the Move reported that Khosrow Behbehani, a noted biomedical researcher, inventor and chairman of the UT Arlington Department of Bioengineering, has been appointed dean of the University’s College of Engineering.

Mohanty research could better explain how the brain responds to stimulation

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Physicists are developing a new tool that could help map out neurons and track their interactions in different areas of the brain, Optics & Photonics News reported. Samarendra Mohanty from UT Arlington hopes that the technology would be useful in understanding how the brain responds to stimulation. In the journal Optics Letters, Mohanty describes the development of a two-photon, fiber-optic optogenetic stimulator and its testing on human cells. A similar report also appeared on CultureMap AustinBigThink.com and Think! (Milan, Italy).

State Of The Art Facility Puts UT Arlington In The Vanguard Of Nanotech Research

Friday, May 13, 2013

Bio News Texas describes UT Arlington's Nanotechnology Research & Education Center (NanoFab) as one of the nation's most advanced university-based nanotechnology development, research, and teaching facilities. NanoFab research activities are conducted through mutually-beneficial associations of chemistry, electrical engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, materials science and physics faculty, graduate students and research assistants at UTA.

UTA Nano Technology Facility Making Big Waves with Microscopic Research

Saturday, May 11, 2013

Arlington Voice reported that the NanoFab manager, Dr Nader Hozhabri, welcomed Anne Coker, president of the Arlington Republican Club, Craig Ownby of Ownby Consulting, Gerald Kern and UTA Republican Club president Nathan Basseto.

Aaerospace Engineer is Developing Diagnostic and Predictive Tools

Saturday, May 10, 2013

A University of Texas at Arlington that can aid aircraft manufacturers in analyzing composite structures used to make aircraft safer, faster, and more reliable, according to the website Aerospace Manufacturing and Design. Andrew Makeev, an associate professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, has received a $559,427 grant from the Office of Naval Research.

Coding students

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

A growing number high school students are learning to write computer code and many entrepreneurs, celebrities and educators are pushing for computer coding to join the ranks of reading, writing and arithmetic, according to a Fort Worth Star-Telegram story that quoted Carter Tiernan, an assistant dean at The University of Texas at Arlington’s College of Engineering. Tiernan and other experts said it makes sense for students to learn more about computers because they are a part of our everyday life. “Nearly everything nowadays is based on computers and computer processing,” she said.

April

Csallner explains possible reasons behind American Airlines computer glitch

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

KXAS/NBC 5 interviewed Christoph Csallner, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at UT Arlington, about the computer glitch in American Airlines’ reservation system that caused planes to be grounded for two hours Tuesday. “The software is so complex, there are so many components…databases, external systems, humans involved, anywhere, something could go wrong,” Csallner said.

Scholarship to support students in Arnold E. Petsche Center for Automotive Engineering

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Product Design & Development reported on the scholarship established by TTI and Mouser Electronics in partnership with The University of Texas at Arlington College of Engineering. The scholarship will help support students enrolled in the University’s Arnold E. Petsche Center for Automotive Engineering who demonstrate academic achievement beyond the classroom.

UNT gets CASA weather radar unit

Friday, April 12, 2013

The region’s second CASA weather radar is now in place at the University of North Texas, doubling the low-level view of developing storms for forecasters, emergency managers and scientists, The Dallas Morning News and NBCDFW.com reported. This second CASA unit should be in operation in about a month, joining the first unit at The University of Texas in Arlington to provide coverage over a broad swath of North Texas. MyFoxDFW.com also reported this story.

Scholarship to support students in Arnold E. Petsche Center for Automotive Engineering

Thursday, April 11, 2013

TTI, Inc. and Mouser Electronics, Inc., two top global distributors for electronic components and a part of the Berkshire Hathaway companies, have established a scholarship in partnership with The University of Texas at Arlington College of Engineering, Reuters and Yahoo! Canada reported. The scholarship will help support students enrolled in the University's Arnold E. Petsche Center for Automotive Engineering who demonstrate academic achievement beyond the classroom. The story also appears on Virtual-Strategy, TMCnet.com, iStockAnalyst, FreshNews.com and other media websites.

Second advanced weather radar system installation planned

Thursday, April 11, 2013

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported that the University of North Texas will install an advanced weather radar system similar to a unit placed atop a UT Arlington building in October. Four of the $500,000 radar units will eventually be operational in the Dallas-Fort Worth region. This second unit will be installed at UNT today.

Tapping computer power to promote physical therapy

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

The Rheumatologist noted research by Fillia Makedon, chair and professor of the Computer Science and Engineering Department at UT Arlington, and a team of researchers from Northeastern University. They’re using the power of computer technology to help rheumatoid arthritis patients do physical therapy at home. The computer system monitors patients’ joint motions, motor performance, and other physiological indicators. The information gathered helps the physical therapy professional better gauge how the patient’s therapy is going.

Mattingly, Massidda research on high-speed rail noted

Monday, April 8, 2013

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram noted research by Stephen Mattingly, a UT Arlington civil engineering professor, and Antonio Massidda, faculty researcher, in an article about the debate over where to build high-speed rail stations in the Dallas-Fort Worth region. Both researchers have spent two years analyzing the impact of high-speed rail on aviation in Europe – and the impact of Amtrak’s Acela Express train service on aviation in the Northeastern United States.

March

Improving cell coverage

Friday, March 22, 2013

A UT Arlington electrical engineering professor is developing a system in which a cell phone could automatically locate available space within a bandwidth, reducing or eliminating “dead spots” in coverage, the website TMCnet.com reported. Qilian Liang, the electrical engineering professor, received a three-year, $470,000 National Science Foundation grant that creates and implements a plan that researches spectrum -sharing technologies.

Environmental monitoring

Thursday, March 21, 2013

A University of Texas at Arlington environmental engineer has received a three-year, $561,730 grant to identify harmful algae blooms in fresh and salt water so that water providers can take action to contain and curb them, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram’s Extra Credit blog. The National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation awarded assistant professor Hyeok Choi the grant to develop and place sensors to find these biological toxins so that they can be monitored.

Monitoring algae threats

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

A University of Texas at Arlington environmental engineer has received a three-year, $561,730 grant to identify harmful algal blooms in fresh and salt water so that water providers can take action to contain and curb the blooms, according to the website Bio-Medicine. The National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation have awarded Assistant Professor Hyeok Choi the grant to develop and place sensors to find where these biological toxins exist so that the harmful algae can be monitored.

Campus home to radar

Monday, March 11, 2013

As North Texas nudges into severe storm season, forecasters, researchers and emergency management will have a new tool – a Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere, or CASA, radar system installed last fall on the roof of Carlisle Hall at The University of Texas at Arlington, according to The Dallas Morning News. The North Central Texas Council of Governments oversees the project. D.J. Seo, an associate professor of civil engineering at UT Arlington, said he already sees the potential in forecasting and responding to very heavy rains.

Robot research

Monday, March 11, 2013

KDFW/Fox 4 rebroadcast an interview with Dan Popa, UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, on its Fox4Ward report during Good Day Saturday. He discussed his research that involves the use of a robot to help diagnose and treat children with autism. The story originally aired last week.

Weather radar system touted

Thursday, March 7, 2013

The Cleburne Times-Review noted that the first of the new weather radar system called CASA – Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere -- in the Metroplex was installed at The University of Texas at Arlington last October.

Makedon leading team in rheumatoid arthritis research

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

UT Arlington researchers are creating individualized, patient-centered rehabilitation software systems that will promote and support physical therapy for people with rheumatoid arthritis,RxPG News reported. Fillia Makedon, Jenkins Garrett Distinguished Professor and chair of the Computer Science and Engineering Department is leading a cross-disciplinary team that will use remote monitoring of people with rheumatoid arthritis to increase compliance and proper physical therapy. The work is funded by a National Science Foundation grant.

KDFW/FOX 4: Popa discusses autism research involving robot

Monday, March 4, 2013

Dan Popa, UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, was the featured guest during KDFW/Fox 4’s Sunday evening segment Fox4Ward. He discussed his research that involves the use of a robot to help diagnose and treat children with autism.

Makedon leading team in rheumatoid arthritis research

Monday, March 4, 2013

UT Arlington researchers are creating individualized, patient-centered rehabilitation software systems that will promote and support physical therapy for people with rheumatoid arthritis,MedicalXpress and HipKneeBook.com reported.

February

Chiao featured in IEEE LifeSciences video

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, was featured in a video in the IEEE LifeSciences e-newsletter. He talked about the coming breakthroughs in the use of wireless technologies in medical applications. Chiao recently chaired one of the sessions at the Conference on Biomedical Wireless Technologies. Chiao is the Janet and Mike Greene Endowed Professor and the Jenkins Garrett Endowed professor of Electrical Engineering at UT Arlington. He also is an adjunct associate professor in the Internal Medicine Department at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Astronaut talks about space, life and gun control

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Astronaut Mark Kelly, a retired U.S. Navy captain and best-selling author, advocated across-the-board background checks when people purchase guns at the Maverick Speakers Series last night, KTVT CBS 11KDFW Fox 4KXAS NBC 5KLIF 570, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and The Dallas Morning News reported. Kelly's wife, U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, survived an assassination attempt back in 2011. Kelly said it took the Newtown, Conn., shooting tragedy before the country started to talk about serious gun controls. Kelly spoke to a packed house at Texas Hall. The Star-Telegram also has a story about Kelly's exploits as an astronaut and the lessons he's learned in life.

Astronaut appearance part of Maverick Speakers Series

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Astronaut Mark Kelly, a retired U.S. Navy captain and best-selling author, will make an appearance tonight at Texas Hall as part of the Maverick Speakers Series, KTVT CBS 11reported. Kelly has been in the news recently pushing for more gun control in the wake of the Connecticut school shooting. His wife, former U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, survived an assassination attempt in 2011.

New imaging system explored

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

A University of Texas at Arlington bioengineer has received a National Science Foundation grant to use light and sound to produce an accurate image of a patient’s deep tissue, according to Photonics.com. Baohong Yuan, an assistant professor of bioengineering, received a $407,163 NSF Early Career Development grant for his hybrid imaging system, which overcomes the challenge of getting accurate images in deep tissue.

Engineering honors

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Fort Worth Chapter of the Texas Society of Professional Engineers (TSPE) has named UT Arlington graduate Benjamin Pylant the Young Engineer of the Year, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Pylant received his Master of Business Administration degree from UT Arlington in 2009. The award is presented to individuals under than 34 years old, who exhibit outstanding contributions to public welfare and advancing the profession of engineering.

Improving healthcare tech

Friday, February 8, 2013

A UT Arlington software engineer is refining a computer testing tool that reduces the amount of time and expense companies must spend to determine whether a new program works, according to websites such as PhysOrg.com and e! Science News. Jeff Lei, an associate professor of computer science and engineering, said the Advanced Combinatorial Testing System, or ACTS, has myriad applications though he currently is focused on using ACTS in healthcare information technology.

Scholarships for young scientists

Monday, February 4, 2013

Students from UT Arlington are among those receiving scholarships as part of the Next Generation Scientists for Biodiesel, a National Biodiesel Board program that aims to educate and collaborate with young scientists, according to an announcement featured on the Rural Radio Network. The United Soybean Board also supports the program.

Astronaut remembered

Monday, February 4, 2013

Numerous news sites, including The Dallas Morning News, KDFW/FOX4, KLBJ/590AM (Austin) and KSLA/CBS12 (Shreveport), reported on UT Arlington’s efforts to honor alumna Kalpana Chawla on the tenth anniversary of her death aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. At 7:59 a.m. Friday, students in front of Kalpana Chawla Hall released biodegradable white balloons in her memory. About 50 science and engineering students held a vigil Thursday night.

Astronaut remembered

Friday, February 1, 2013

KXAS/NBC 5 aired a story about UT Arlington ceremonies honoring Kalpana Chawla, a UT Arlington engineering graduate who was one of the seven astronauts who died 10 years ago in the Columbia Shuttle disaster. NBC 5 also interviewed Don Wilson, a professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, who was Chawla's adviser.

Ceremonies remember Chawla

Friday, February 1, 2013

UT Arlington scheduled a vigil and storytelling event last night and a balloon release this morning in honor of astronaut Kalpana Chawla, a UT Arlington graduate, The Associated Press notes in stories carried on KRLD 1080 AMFox 26 in Houston, ABC 9 in Nacogdoches, KCBD in Lubbock, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the El Paso Times and several other sites.

Dallas Business Journal features J.-C. Chiao, TMAC

Friday, February 1, 2013

UT Arlington's TMAC is assisting J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor at UT Arlington, in marketing and commercializing an invention Chiao and his team believes could detect Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, the Dallas Business Journal reported. TMAC is formerly known as the Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center.

January

Bioengineer's research studies lung growth, function

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

A UT Arlington bioengineering researcher has teamed with a UT Southwestern colleague to develop a nanoparticle drug delivery system that will help stimulate lung growth and function after partial lung removal or destructive lung disease,COPD News of the Day reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, is working on the drug-delivery portion of the project, which is funded through a $3.4 million National Institutes of Health grant through 2016. Nguyen’s work will be underwritten by $440,000 of the larger grant.

UT Arlington plan for $10,000 degree noted

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

The Texas Tribune published a guide to earning one of Texas $10,000 degrees that Gov. Perry had urged colleges and universities to institute two years ago. UT Arlington's plan was noted in the coverage. The Tribune also published aTexplainer story and chart detailing a student's path to that $10,000 degree. The Tribune reported that the bottom line is that a $10,000 degree in Texas may be attainable, but only for those who are able to commit to a very specific degree plan before starting their junior year of high school.

Texas Tribune Hot Seat event features state lawmakers

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

The Texas Tribune featured state Sen. Kelly Hancock, R-Fort Worth, and state Rep. Diane Patrick at a Hot Seat event at UT Arlington Friday. The two lawmakers talked about public education, health care, the state budget, higher education and other issues in play during the 83rd Legislative Session.

Vice president says new center will focus on homeland security research

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Carolyn Cason, UT Arlington vice president for research, said one focus of the new SAVANT Center at the University would be research surrounding homeland security, KRLD 1080 reported. The Security Advances Via Applied Nanotechnology, or SAVANT, Center will focus on using nanotechnology to strengthen and enhance U.S. security through collaborative research across disciplines.

UT Arlington bioengineering researcher helping to develop system that will stimulate lung growth

Friday, January 25, 2013

A UT Arlington bioengineering researcher has teamed with a UT Southwestern colleague to develop a nanoparticle drug delivery system that will help stimulate lung growth and function after partial lung removal or destructive lung disease, The A to Z of Nanotechnology reported.

Bio-Medicine.org highlights work by Nguyen and UTSW colleague studying how to send drugs to lungs through nanotechnology

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate bioengineering professor, has teamed with a UT Southwestern colleague to develop a nanoparticle drug delivery system that will help stimulate lung growth and function after partial lung removal or destructive lung disease, Bio-Medicine.org reported. Nguyen’s work will be underwritten by $440,000 of a $3.4 million National Institutes of Health grant.

Turning trash into treasure

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

A Denton Record-Chronicle editorial commended efforts by UT Arlington researchers to help double the power-generating capacity in Denton through a method that involves capturing methane at the city’s landfill. Civil engineering professors Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler will study fugitive emissions at the site. “It’s a great idea and one that we believe will eventually be a standard in cities across the nation,” the editorial said.

UT Arlington researchers work examining heat minimization in 3D integrated circuits explained in Electronics Cooling

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

A team of UT Arlington researchers funded by the National Science Foundation has been formed to examine potential solutions for heat minimization and dissipation in three-dimensional integrated circuits, Electronics Cooling.com reported. According to Ankur Jain, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UT Arlington and a member of the research team, the limited amount of available space on an integrated circuits has forced engineers to “build vertically, placing wafers on top of wafers.”

Green Optimistic profiles UT Arlington civil engineering profs working to recover methane to double electricity output at Denton landfill

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Green Optimistic.com reported on efforts by UT Arlington engineers to recover methane to double the electricity output of a Denton landfill. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, associate professors of civil engineering, funded by a $344,414 city grant, were able to make improvements to the landfill’s gas recovery system.

UT Arlington engineering professors recognized as inventors

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

The Fort Worth Business Press reported that four University of Texas at Arlington engineering professors have been named charter fellows to the National Academy of Inventors. They are Khosrow Behbehani, professor and chairman of the bioengineering department; Nai Yuen Chen, a National Academy of Engineering member and distinguished research professor in the materials science and engineering department; George Kondraske, electrical engineering professor; and Robert Magnusson, the Texas Instruments Distinguished University Chair in Nanoelectronics and an electrical engineering professor.

UT Arlington researchers help expand Denton gas power's project

Monday, January 14, 2013

Denton powers about 1,600 homes with methane captured from the city landfill — gas created after the city started adding water to the pile in 2008, the Denton Record-Chronicle reported. Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are helping to double that power-generating capacity. The project is the first of its kind in Texas, according to UT Arlington’s lead researcher, Sahadat Hossain. Landfills typically are kept covered and dry in order to limit methane emissions, said Hossain, an associate professor of civil engineering and internationally renowned expert on landfill management.

Four UT Arlington engineers named National Academy of Inventors charter fellows

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Four UT Arlington engineers were named 2012 Charter Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, the Street Insider, the Jacksonville (Fla.) Business Journal and TickerTech.com reported. The four UT Arlington innovators are: Khosrow Behbehani, professor and chair of the Bioengineering Department; Nai Yuen Chen, a National Academy of Engineering member and distinguished research professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department; George Kondraske, electrical engineering professor; and Robert Magnusson, the Texas Instruments Distinguished University Chair in Nanoelectronics and an electrical engineering professor.

UT Arlington engineers finding new ways to cool integrated circuits

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

A team of UT Arlington researchers funded by the National Science Foundation is working first to minimize the heat generated in three-dimensional integrated circuits and then to develop nano-windows that will allow the heat to dissipate before it damages the silicon chips inside, websites such as Bio-Medicine and NSF.gov reported. Ankur Jain, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, is working with colleague Dereje Agonafer, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and Roger Schmidt, IBM fellow and chief engineer, on the project.

In the News Archive