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In the News

September

Embracing Challenge Award

Friday, September 23, 2016

Kytai Nguyen, UTA bioengineering professor, has won the inaugural Elsevier's Materials Today Embracing Challenge Award, ABC/NBC WALB News 10 in Albany, Ga., ABC WLOX 8 in Biloxi, Miss., Yahoo! Finance, USA Life Sciences and many other websites reported. Nguyen will receive her award Nov. 29 in Boston at the Materials Research Society’s fall meeting. Elsevier, publisher of Materials Today, is a world-leading provider of information solutions and publisher of more than 2,500 journals and 33,000 book titles.

Life science summit

Friday, September 23, 2016

About 400 life science and health care leaders are expected to attend the second annual iC3 Life Science Summit in Arlington, Fort Worth Business reported. Presented by bionorthTX, a regional life sciences industry association, the Wednesday, Oct. 26, event will convene at UTA’s College Park Center.

Sewer robot

Friday, September 23, 2016

UTA’s sewer-exploring robot was highlighted on the ASCEgamechangers.org website. ASCE is the American Society of Civil Engineers. The University of Texas at Arlington has an agreement with the city of Arlington to monitor and evaluate 48 miles of its sewers. 

Alum collects honor

Friday, September 23, 2016

Gary Trietsch, a UTA alumnus and College of Engineering Advisory Board member, accepted top honors for the Harris County Toll Road Authority in the technology category at the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association’s 84th annual meeting and exhibition in Denver, Colo., recently, PR Newswire reported. Trietsch, who also has received the UTA Engineering Distinguished Alumni Award, received the award for the authority’s rapid alert system technology.

Blood pressure control

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

UTA researchers are developing a new method and device for controlling blood pressure levels in cardiac care environments that use targeted electrical stimulation rather than drugs, Medical Xpress reported. The National Institutes of Health has awarded Associate Professor Young-Tae Kim and Professor Khosrow Behbehani, both from the UTA Department of Bioengineering, and Muthu Wijesundara, division head for the biomedical division at the UTA Research Institute, a $440,670 grant for the research.

Embracing Challenge award

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Kytai Nguyen, UTA bioengineering professor, has won the inaugural Materials Today Embracing Challenge Award, Elsevier Connect reported. Nguyen will receive her award Nov. 29 in Boston at the Materials Research Society’s fall meeting. Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions and publisher of more than 2,500 journals and 33,000 book titles.

ClaimBuster talk

Monday, September 19, 2016

Bill Adair, director of the DeWitt Wallace Center and Knight Professor of the Practice of Journalism & Public Policy at Duke University, was interviewed on WNET PBS 13's The Open Mind program in New York about ClaimBuster, an automated fact checking software program they helped build with The University of Texas at Arlington. UTA's Chengkai Li, a UTA associate professor and director of the Innovative Database and Information Systems Research Laboratory, was a chief contributor to the project.

Use of near-infrared light

Friday, September 16, 2016

A team of researchers at UTA recently published a study on the effects of near-infrared light on veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries, Life Science Daily and Health Imaging reported. Hanli Liu, UTA bioengineering professor and the research team leader, said this is the first time that NIR light has been used for treatment.

Networked learning

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

New research at The University of Texas at Arlington will analyze massive scale data traces from online work and learning communities to create new designs for networked learning and next generation knowledge building on the internet, Phys.org reported. George Siemens was awarded a three-year, $400,000 grant from the National Science Foundation as part of a project proposal organized by Carnegie Mellon University to study Big Data.

iC3 Life Summit

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

The second annual iC3 Life Summit will be held Oct. 26 at College Park Center at The University of Texas at Arlington, Phys.org and CBS WDJT 58 in Milwaukee, Wisc., reported. The summit is sponsored by bionorthTX, the region’s leading life science industry association. More than 400 industry, government and university leaders are expected to attend the day-long event with presentations focused on the themes of innovation, collaboration, capital formation and commercialization.

Shimadzu tools

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Andrew Makeev, UTA professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, was featured on the Shimadzu website, talking about his use of the HPV-X2 and HBV-2A analytical instruments. Makeev uses them to predict the lifespan of aircraft and its materials. The Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies was established 2013 as a result of the partnership between UTA and the Shimadzu Corp. Shimadzu is a company that manufactures precision instruments, measuring instruments and medical equipment.

Building after 9/11

Monday, September 12, 2016

Shih-Ho Chao, UTA associate professor of structural engineering and applied mechanics, published an article, “How Building Changed after 9/11” in the Houston Chronicle. The academic article news site The Conversation first published the article. It published a series of articles to commemorate the 15 year anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Shih-Ho Chao, UTA associate professor of structural engineering and applied mechanics, published an article, “How Building Changed after 9/11” in the academic article news site The Conversation, which published a series of articles to commemorate the 15 year anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Friday, September 9, 2016

The Poynter Institute cited UTA’s automated live fact-checking tool Claimbuster as a success story in an article on the lessons learned from automated fact-checking experiments. Claimbuster is a research project led by UTA Computer Science Engineering Associate Professor Chengkai Li, in collaboration with journalism experts and computer scientists from Duke, Stanford and Google Research.

Friday, September 9, 2016

UTA bioengineering professor Hanli Liu has demonstrated the benefits of near infrared light treatment on brains traumatized by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD, suffered many times by U.S. veterans, Neuroscientist News, Health Imaging and Science Codex reported. 

Strategic Plan

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

UTA “has galloped forward in its Strategic Plan 2020: “Bold Solutions | Global Impact” by awarding four 2016 interdisciplinary research program grants, Dallas Innovates reported.

Infrared light treatment

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

UTA bioengineering professor Hanli Liu has demonstrated the benefits of near infrared light treatment on brains traumatized by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD, suffered many times by U.S. veterans, MedicalXpress reported. 

Yum receives grant

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

D Healthcare Daily reported on the $100,000 grant UTA assistant professor Kyungsuk Yum received to develop composite hydrogel bioinks that would be compatible with human tissue. Inks are currently a major barrier blocking further research and development of functional 3-D organs. 

Interdisciplinary grants awarded

Friday, September 2, 2016

UTA has awarded four seed grants to interdisciplinary research projects that address growing problems such as loneliness among the elderly, the need for sustainable green education spaces, the health crisis among urban American Indians and the mechanisms behind heart failure among the elderly, ScienMag reported. 

New bioinks

Friday, September 2, 2016

Kyungsuk Yum, assistant professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department of UTA’s College of Engineering, has received a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop nano-composite hydrogel bioinks that can be used in printing human tissues and organs, Dallas Innovates reported. 

August

Alum heads public works

Monday, August 29, 2016

UTA alumna Mindy Gowdy Carmichael is the first woman to head the Arlington Public Works Department, the Star-Telegram reported. Carmichael earned her degree in civil engineering from UTA. 

Graduate named vice president

Monday, August 29, 2016

UTA alumnus Tommy Slater has been named vice president of the Public Service Co. of Oklahoma, Tulsa World and News OK reported. Slater earned a degree in science and mechanical engineering from UTA.

Weighted wing system

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

IEEE’s Electronics 360 reported on UTA graduate Sampath Vengate’s efforts to use an unmanned aerial vehicle that uses moving weights in its wings instead of traditional control surfaces or ailerons to turn.

Firm names new vice president

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Electric Energy Online reported that alumnus Tommy Slater has been named vice president to oversee the company's generating assets by the Public Service Company of Oklahoma, an electric utility company. Slater earned a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering from UTA.

Lab funding

Monday, August 22, 2016

UMED Holdings Inc., through its wholly owned subsidiary Greenway Innovative Energy Inc., announced that it has raised $1 million to complete the funding of UTA's F. Conrad Greer Lab, Yahoo! FinancePenn Energy, Financial BuzzThe Canadian Business Journal, CityBizList Dallas and many other websites reported. The lab will construct a fully operational scaled model of a gas-to-liquids conversion unit.

Clean energy

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

UTA and The Korea Institute of Energy Research have signed an agreement to focus on developing and commercializing technologies that have global environmental impact, North Texas-based Korean Town News reported.

Data mining

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

UTA Computer Science and Engineering professor Heng Huang’s National Science Foundation-funded data-mining efforts could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of depression, Collective Intelligence reported.

Student success

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

A recently graduated UTA master’s student is the first person to successfully flight test an unmanned aerial vehicle that uses moving weights in its wings instead of traditional control surfaces or ailerons to turn, Before It’s News reported.

Mining thoughts

Monday, August 15, 2016

ScienMag.com and Science & Enterprise reported that Heng Huang, a UTA professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department, has won a three-year, $500,000 National Science Foundation grant to use data mining to efficiently catalog and track depression patients’ “thought records” so that doctors and therapists can better identify patients’ treatment needs.

IceCube Neutrino

Monday, August 15, 2016

Business Insider, Business Insider India, Business Insider Australia, the Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel and the Star Tribune reported scientists with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory are 99 percent sure that the particle that holds the clues to our existence doesn’t exist. Ben Jones, a UTA post-doctoral student and one of the leading researchers in the study, was quoted in the article.

Construction technology

Monday, August 15, 2016

Underground Construction reported on the upcoming 22nd annual Underground Construction Technology International Conference & Exhibition, which will feature continuing education and professional development programs in conjunction with UTA.

Clean energy

Monday, August 15, 2016

UTA and The Korea Institute of Energy Research have joined forces to develop clean energy technologies that improve the lives of citizens worldwide, reported Solar Thermal Magazine.

Understanding addiction

Friday, August 12, 2016

Linda Perrotti, UTA associate professor of psychology, is studying how fluctuating estrogen levels make females increasingly sensitive to the rewarding effects of cocaine and ultimately, vulnerable to cocaine addiction, Healio reported.

Big data

Friday, August 12, 2016

The National Science Foundation has awarded a five-year, $535,763 Faculty Early Career Development, or CAREER, grant to Junzhou Huang, a UTA assistant professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department, to discover a process by which image-omics data can be combined into files that are small enough that current computing technology will allow scientists to better predict how long a patient will live and how best to treat that patient, Communications of the ACM reported.

Weights in wings

Friday, August 12, 2016

Sampath Reddy Vengate, who recently graduated with a master’s degree in aerospace engineering from UTA, is  the first person to successfully fly a UAV that uses mass actuation -- a technique that uses moving weights to efficiently turn an aircraft, ZDNet.com reported.

New COE dean named

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Peter E. Crouch joins The University of Texas at Arlington this month as the dean of the College of Engineering and as a professor of electrical engineering, The Dallas Morning News reported.

Huang gets NSF CAREER grant

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

UTA researcher Junzhou Huang is developing computing tools that will employ multiple methods of accessing and analyzing very large, complex patient data, Sciencemag.com and other websites reported. Huang, an assistant professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department, received a National Science Foundation Early CAREER grant to perform the research.

Weights in wings

Monday, August 8, 2016

Sampath Reddy Vengate, a recent UTA master of science in aerospace engineering graduate, used existing UTA research to design, build and test an unmanned aerial vehicle that uses mass actuation — weights that move back and forth within the wings to change the center of gravity from side to side — to turn while airborne, leading scientific trends outlets New Atlas (Gizmag) and Trendhunter reported.

UAV flying with weights

Thursday, August 4, 2016

Sampath Vengate, who graduated from UTA in May with a master’s in aerospace engineering, is the first person to successfully flight test an unmanned aerial vehicle that uses moving weights in its wings instead of traditional control surfaces or ailerons to turn, Phys.org reported.

Engineering grad also photographs

Thursday, August 4, 2016

UTA engineering alumnus Nikola Olic was featured in a Dallas Observer article. In addition to being an engineer, Olic is a professional BMX flatlander and photographer who takes fascinating pictures of downtown Dallas' architecture. 

UTA grad starts scholarship

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Richard J. Matus, a corporate executive who received his doctorate in aerospace engineering from UTA, has established the Richard J. Matus ’80 Scholarship in Aerospace Engineering through the Texas A & M Foundation, Texas A & M reported on its website.

New COE dean

Monday, August 1, 2016

The Chronicle of Higher Education noted the appointment of Peter Crouch as the new dean of the College of Engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington. Crouch previously served as dean of engineering at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

July

Best paper winners

Friday, July 29, 2016

A team of electrical engineering professors and students at UTA won three “Best Paper” Awards from the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, including the organization’s 2016 Power and Energy Society Prize Paper Award, ScienMag.com reported. Assistant Professor Ali Davoudi, Professor Frank Lewis, and doctoral students Vahidreza Nasirian and Josep Guerrero won their first award for the paper in IEEE’s Transactions on Energy Conversion titled, “Distributed Adaptive Droop Control for DC Distribution Systems.”

Infrastructure solutions

Friday, July 29, 2016

The Longview News-Journal reported a Star-Telegram editorial offering UTA Civil Engineering Professor Sahadat Hossain’s use of plastic pins to alleviate soil shifting as a solution to Texas’ growing infrastructure problem. AP Newswire distributed the editorial from an original Star-Telegram opinion piece.

Sustainable landfills

Friday, July 29, 2016

The Amarillo Globe-News mentioned the partnership between the city of Denton and UTA researchers Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler to create a more sustainable landfill in an article on Amarillo’s landfill issues.

Addressing infrastructure issues

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

The Star-Telegram editorial board offered UTA Civil Engineering Professor Sahadat Hossain’s use of plastic pins to alleviate soil shifting as a solution to Texas’ growing infrastructure problem. Hossain’s research is cost-effective and could provide a long-term solution for infrastructure issues. The Washington Times, Austin American-Statesman, The Eagle and various other outlets also reported on the editorial.

Engineering faculty member recognized

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Daniel Darrouzet, a UTA civil engineering adjunct faculty member, was highlighted in a Preston Hollow Advocate article about authors in the neighborhood. Darrouzet recently self-published a book of short-stories about fictional detective Sherlock Holmes.

Grant awarded

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

The U.S. Conference of Mayors joined with Walmart and the Walmart Foundation Monday to launch the third awards cycle of the Walmart U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund, Spoke.com, Yahoo! Finance, GlobeAdvisor and many other websites reported. UTA and the UTA Research Institute received previous grants from the group aimed at creating better small motor manufacturing.

Alumnus relocates company

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Jeff Jones, a UTA industrial engineering graduate, is moving his company, PRO Hydronic Specialties, from Garland to Henderson, where he has East Texas roots, the Longview News Journal reported. 

Brain performance

Monday, July 25, 2016

A unique approach to brain performance capacities uses the science of General Systems Performance Theory developed by George Kondraske, director of UTA's Human Performance Institute, HitConsultant reported. Kondraske is one of the lead scientists working with RC21X, a brain performance monitoring startup that has been selected to join StartUp Health and its exclusive academy for digital health entrepreneurs.

Jones talks innovation and technology

Friday, July 22, 2016

The nationally televised program, “Business First AM,” interviewed Erick Jones, a UTA professor of industrial, manufacturing and systems engineering, about the Supply Chain Tech Conference taking place this week in Chicago. In addition to discussions about innovation, education and careers, Jones said the conference offers leaders a look at how companies can drive profits with new technology.

Pain relief

Thursday, July 21, 2016

J.-C. Chiao, the UTA Janet and Mike Greene and Jenkins Garrett Professor of electrical engineering, discussed his team's invention of a wireless implant that could ease chronic pain without pills, KXAS/NBC 5 reported. NBCDFW.com published a web version of the story.

Testing composites

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Andrew Makeev, a UTA professor of aerospace engineering, received a $181,000 grant from the Office of Naval Research to purchase an ARES-G2 integrated axial-torsional platform that will allow his team to better understand material properties including defect formation in composites as a function of manufacturing process, ScienceMag reported. Such material properties will now be integrated in computational models replacing trial-and-error testing to improve manufacturing processes for aircraft composite parts.

New COE dean named

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Peter E. Crouch, dean of engineering for the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and the former dean of Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering, joins The University of Texas at Arlington in August as dean of the nationally ranked College of Engineering and as a professor of electrical engineering, ASEE’s First Bell reported. ASEE is the American Society of Engineering Education.

New engineering dean named

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Peter E. Crouch, dean of engineering for the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and the former dean of Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering, joins UTA in August as dean of the nationally ranked College of Engineering and as a professor of electrical engineering, WALB ABC 10 in Albany, Ga., KIII ABC 3 in Corpus Christi, KOAM CBS 7 in Joplin, Mo., KFMB CBS 8 in San Diego and many other websites reported. 

High-speed rail in Texas

Thursday, July 14, 2016

A feasibility study on high-speed rail in Texas by Stephen Mattingly, a UTA associate professor of civil engineering, was cited in a NRDC article on Texas Central Railway’s plan to run trains between Dallas and Houston. The UTA study concluded that a T-shaped route connecting the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex, Houston, and San Antonio could draw as many as 22,000 passengers daily.

Robots that care

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Manfred Huber, professor in UTA’s Computer Science and Engineering Department, and Mike McNair, automation and intelligent systems director at The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute, reviewed current and future technology regarding robots and their ability to help people with everyday tasks, Tech Insider reported. McNair and Huber’s parts in the segment start about the 3:58 mark.

Electric car

Monday, July 11, 2016

ASEE First Bell reported that a team of UTA engineering students taking part in the 16th annual Texas Autocross Weekend will “enter an electric car into the proceedings” for the first time this year. The vehicle “will be powered by four student-designed motors and is capable of much better acceleration than a regular combustion vehicle.”

Event to feature all-electric car

Friday, July 8, 2016

UTA students will run an all-electric formula car in the 16th annual Texas Autocross Weekend, which is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday on the UTA campus, The Dallas Morning News reported. Sixteen teams from 10 universities and UTA will compete this weekend in their Formula Society of Automotive Engineers cars. "Everyone is interested in the electric cars: students, researchers, industry. It's not only the future, it's the present," said Bob Woods, a UTA professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and longtime adviser to the UTA's student team.

Award of Merit

Friday, July 8, 2016

Joe Lundy, adjunct professor in the UTA Civil Engineering Department, has received the Award of Merit from the American Society for Testing and Materials International's Committee on Concrete Pipe, ASTM International reported. The prestigious award, which includes being named a Fellow, is ASTM’s highest recognition for individual contributions to developing standards.

Flash-flood app

Thursday, July 7, 2016

The National Science Foundation’s Science 360 website featured a video about a phone app that tracks flash flooding developed by UTA’s D.J. Seo, a civil engineering associate professor. The video also mentioned that Seo has deployed high-tech sensors in the Dallas area to better detect creek and stream flooding. Those sensors work with the Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere or CASA system. Seo’s story starts about the 4-minute mark.

Deep brain stimulation

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Research on deep brain stimulation by UTA professors J.C. Chiao and Yuan Bo Peng was featured in a Newsmax Health article on new techniques that offer drug-free ways to relieve pain. "This is the first study to use a wireless electrical device to alleviate pain by directly stimulating the ventral tegmental area of the brain," Peng said. “While still under laboratory testing, this new method does provide hope that in the future we will be able to alleviate chronic pain without the side effects of medication.” 

16th Annual Texas Autocross Weekend

Friday, July 1, 2016

WBAP/820 AM interviewed Bob Woods, professor in the UTA Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Formula SAE racing adviser, about the 16th Annual Texas Autocross Weekend scheduled July 9-10 at UTA. For the first time, one of the UTA competition cars will be an all-electric vehicle powered by four student-designed, in-wheel motors.  “We have been building this car for the last three years… it will be the most sophisticated Formula electric car built in the southern hemisphere,” Woods said.

June

Texas Autocross

Thursday, June 30, 2016

The familiar revving of student-designed and built FSAE racecars will be the norm at the 16th Annual Texas Autocross Weekend scheduled July 9-10 on The University of Texas at Arlington campus, Dallas Innovates reported. For the first time, one of the UTA competition cars will be an all-electric vehicle powered by four student-designed, in-wheel motors. As with other high performance electric cars, this car is capable of much better acceleration than a regular combustion car.

Entrepreneur honor

Thursday, June 30, 2016

IndiaWest.com reported that five Indian Americans, including a UTA alumnus, are among this year’s regional Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year winners. Raj Malik is the president and chief executive officer of Irving-based BioWorld Merchandising. He won in the consumer products category at the Southwest regional June 25 banquet. Malik earned his bachelor’s degree in computer science and engineering from UTA.

Health forum

Friday, June 17, 2016

EE Times reported on the 5th annual Health Technology Forum Innovation Conference, which is the brainchild of alumnus Pronoy Saha. The conference explores the intersection of digital innovation and health care, showing that technology and compassion aren’t mutually exclusive. Saha earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from UTA.

Sewer robot

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

The University of Texas at Arlington and the city of Arlington are collaborating on using a sewer robot to look for potential problems in those pipes, Water Online reported. Equipped with a high-def video camera, lasers, sonar and sensors, the robot evaluates the city’s sewer pipes to see where a problem might occur. Civil Engineering Chair and Professor Ali Abolmaali is leading the UTA effort. “We’ll make recommendations for what to do based on where the robots and sonar detects anomalies within the pipes. This research could provide a blueprint for other cities to copy.”

UTA-EPA agreement

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

The University of Texas at Arlington and the Environmental Protection Agency signed a memo of understanding to address a growing need for environmental engineering workers, the American Society for Engineering Education’s First Bell e-newsletter reported. The story originally appeared in Fort Worth Business.

UTA alumni retiring

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Chris Burkett, Mansfield's assistant city manager, is retiring after 33 years service and having guided that city through many changes, the Star-Telegram reported. Burkett graduated from The University of Texas at Arlington with a bachelor's of science in civil engineering.

Assistive robots

Friday, June 10, 2016

In the not-too-distant future, robots could do everyday tasks for humans, the National Science Foundation Discovery website and Phys.org reported. Dan Popa, a former UTA professor and now at the University of Louisville, was interviewed in the article. Popa still teams with researchers and professors at UTA. One of the projects he continues to work on with UTA is a nursing assistant robot.

New director

Friday, June 10, 2016

Matthew Wright, a UTA associate professor in computer science and engineering, has been named director of the Rochester Institute of Technology's Center for Cybersecurity, the Rochester (N.Y.) Business Journal reported. Wright also will become a faculty member in the Department of Computing Security.

Scholarship winner

Friday, June 10, 2016

Megan Clawson received a Liberty, Texas, Rotary Club scholarship, The Vindicator reported. Clawson plans to attend UTA studying computer science. She wants to become a health care systems analyst working in a hospital.

UTA-EPA partnership

Thursday, June 9, 2016

A newly announced partnership between The University of Texas at Arlington and the Environmental Protection Agency targets a growing need for environmental engineering workers, Fort Worth Business reported. “What we’re trying to do is focus on the larger areas of environmental and occupational safety training,” said UTA President Vistasp Karbhari, referring to his school’s longtime role in training EPA workers in occupational safety and health.

Flash flood phone app

Thursday, June 9, 2016

An app developed by a UTA professor allows users to file reports when they see flash flooding in creeks, streams, streets and in houses, KOMO AM 1000 in Seattle, Wash., and WKXW FM 101.5 in Trenton, N.J., reported. D.J. Seo, associate professor of civil engineering at UTA, developed the free Google Play app, called iSeeFlood. The app is available for Android users. An iPhone version is being considered.

City using UTA sewer robot

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

The city of Arlington is collaborating with UTA researchers in using robots to determine the health of its sewer pipes, the Star-Telegram reported.

Summit at UTA

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

BionorthTX will have its second annual iC3 Life Science Summit at UTA Oct. 26, Virtual Strategy Magazine reported.

Flash flooding app

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

An app developed by a UTA professor allows users to file reports when they see flash flooding in creeks, streams, streets and in houses, the National Science Foundation website, Crowdsourcing.com, Claims Journal, the Olympian and other websites reported. D.J. Seo, associate professor of civil engineering at UTA , developed the free Google Play app, called iSeeFlood. The app is available for Android users. An iPhone version is being considered.

Scholarship winner

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Informed Infrastructures reported that the ACI Foundation, the non-profit subsidiary of American Concrete Institute that facilitates industry research, collaboration, student fellowships and scholarships, has announced the 17 recipients of the 2016-2017 fellowships and scholarships. UTA student Shuveksha Tuladhar received the ACI Katharine & Bryant Mather Scholarship.

Flood report

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

The Washington Times and Claims Journal reported that D.J. Seo, a UTA associate professor of civil engineering, has launched the crowdsourcing app, iSeeFlood, that will allow real-time flooding to be reported.

Student scholar

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

ForConstructionPros.com reported that the ACI Foundation, the non-profit subsidiary of American Concrete Institute that facilitates industry research, collaboration, student fellowships and scholarships, has announced the 17 recipients of the 2016-2017 fellowships and scholarships. UTA student Shuveksha Tuladhar received the ACI Katharine & Bryant Mather Scholarship.

Diamond semiconductors

Monday, June 6, 2016

Electronic Products reported that joint research between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and The University of Texas at Arlington has developed a new method for doping single crystals of diamond, which could help diamonds realize their full potential as semiconductors.

iSeeFlood

Monday, June 6, 2016

UTA Civil Engineering Associate Professor D.J. Seo created the iSeeFlood app, which allows people to report flooding when they spot high water, Homeland Security News Wire, Idaho Statesman, The News & Observer, Miami Herald, The Washington Times and various other media outlets reported.

Flash flood app

Friday, June 3, 2016

An app developed by a UT-Arlington professor allows users to file reports when they see flash flooding in creeks, streams, streets and in houses, KXAS/NBC 5, KDFW/Fox 4, Phys.org, Informed Infrastructure and other websites reported. D.J. Seo, associate professor of civil engineering at UTA , developed the free Google Play app, called iSeeFlood. The app is available for Android users. An iPhone version is being considered.

Diamond use

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Joint research between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and The University of Texas at Arlington has developed a new method for doping single crystals of diamond, which could help diamonds realize their full potential as semiconductors, the IEEE's Spectrum reported. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers magazine reported on the research, which was recently published in the Journal of Applied Physics. The research showed the superior thermal properties of diamonds compared with those of silicon.

Flash flood help

Thursday, June 2, 2016

An Arlington professor is combining data from radar and high-tech sensors as well as crowd-sourced information to help warn people about flash flooding, The Dallas Morning News reported. The iSeeFlood app -- created by UTA Civil Engineering Associate Professor D.J. Seo --allows people to report flooding when they spot high water.

Using lasers on roads

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Scanning lasers are being investigated as a tool to measure microtexture of aggregates used in asphalt and concrete mixtures, and could someday replace the camera-based systems used by transportation agencies today, Photonics.com reported. Professor Roger Walker, who is in the UTA Computer Science and Engineering Department, is leading the $671,011 project funded by the Texas Department of Transportation. Walker said the lasers will enable more accurate measurements.

Engineer helps UAVs work together

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

A University of Texas at Arlington aerospace engineer has won an Air Force Research Laboratory grant to improve the ability of unmanned vehicle systems to work together and better analyze data collected within an environment, ScienceMag and MyInforms.com reported. Kamesh Subbarao, the UTA engineer, will design a system that will allow spacecraft to know where another is located.

Flash flood app

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

D.J. Seo, associate professor of civil engineering, was featured in a WFAA News 8 Daybreak story about a cell phone app his team released Friday that allows users to report flash flooding.

Valedictorian chooses UTA

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Casey Cravey, the 2016 Denison High School valedictorian, shared with his classmates his lessons along the way to graduation, the Herald Democrat reported. Carvey plans to attend UTA to study mechanical engineering. Because of his math and science skills, he said it made the most sense to pursue a career that would involve creating projects. Cravey said one of the main reasons he chose UTA was because of the UTA racing team, which he believes would be a fun experience in college.

Scholarship winner

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

David Juan, a Dallas Wilson High School graduate who will attend UTA, recently received a $5,000 scholarship from Tommy Terrific’s Carwash, the Lakewood Advocate and Carwash.com reported.

May

Flash flood data

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

D.J. Seo, associate professor of civil engineering, was featured in a story about a cell phone app his team released Friday that allows users to report flash flooding, KRLD AM 1080 and WFAA/ABC 8  reported. 

Popular MOOC

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

UTA's Introduction of Engineering was listed as in the top 10 of most popular MOOCs or Massive Open Online Courses in the nation, OpenCulture.com reported. In June alone, the article stated more than 300 free MOOC courses will start.

Flash flood data

Friday, May 27, 2016

KTVT/CBS 11 and the Star-Telegram reported that D.J. Seo, a UTA associate professor of civil engineering, today will launch the crowdsourcing application iSeeFlood, which will allow real-time flooding information to be reported. The free app adds another layer to existing flood gauges and will work with the network of CASA (Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere) radars stationed across the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Diamonds as semiconductors

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and The University of Texas at Arlington have taken an important step toward prepping diamonds for their debut as semiconductors, with a new way to dope a single crystal of a diamond, which is a crucial process for developing electronic devices, Electronics 360 reported.

SEIR Building

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

The University of Texas at Arlington will begin construction in fall of 2016 on the $125 million Science and Engineering Innovation and Research Building, Tradeline reported. Designed by Page and ZGF Architects to support collaborative, team-based learning and discovery, the six-story, 220,000-square foot facility will provide two floors of instructional space, with research activities occupying four floors and a basement level.

Road improvements

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Informed Infrastructure reported that a University of Texas at Arlington engineer is working with the Texas A&M Transportation Institute to assess whether scanning lasers can accurately measure microtexture of aggregates, which are used in asphalt and concrete mixtures. 

Data-driven discovery

Monday, May 23, 2016

Equipment World reported that Roger Walker, a UTA professor of computer science and engineering, is working with the Texas Transportation Institute at Texas A&M to assess whether scanning lasers can accurately measure the microtexture of aggregates used in asphalt and concrete mixtures. The two-year, $671,011 project is funded through the Texas Department of Transportation, which currently uses camera-based systems to assess aggregate characteristics.

Laser technology

Friday, May 20, 2016

A University of Texas at Arlington engineer is working with the Texas A&M Transportation Institute to assess whether scanning lasers can accurately measure microtexture of aggregates, which are used in asphalt and concrete mixtures, Photonics Online and Lidarnews.com reported.

Laser technology

Thursday, May 19, 2016

AZO Optics reported that Roger Walker, a UTA professor of computer science and engineering, is working with the Texas A&M Transportation Institute to assess whether scanning lasers can accurately measure microtexture of aggregates, which are used in asphalt and concrete mixtures. The two-year, $671,011 project is funded through the Texas Department of Transportation. The agency currently uses camera-based systems to assess aggregate characteristics. The project is also noted on the TXDOT website.

Brain signals

Thursday, May 19, 2016

KTVN/CBS 2 (Reno, Nev.) aired a story in which Jodi Tommerdahl, a UTA associate professor in the College of Education, was interviewed about interdisciplinary research with the Colleges of Science, Engineering and School of Social Work. The work is focused on identifying brain signals associated with anger. The goal is to build a wearable device that would help violent offenders manage the emotions that often get them into trouble. The story initially appeared on KTVT/CBS 11.

SEIR building approved

Thursday, May 19, 2016

The Arlington Voice reported that The University of Texas System’s Board of Regents approved the design of a new $125 million science and engineering building on the UTA campus. The Science and Engineering Innovation and Research (SEIR) building will support enrollment growth across the campus and further the university’s health science initiatives.

Minority boost needed in STEM

Thursday, May 19, 2016

A Florida Politics.com column about the need for boosting the number of African-Americans in the STEM disciplines cited a March article in American Scientist by Ashanti Johnson, UTA assistant vice provost for faculty recruitment and and associate professor of earth and environmental sciences. Johnson wrote: “A highly diverse team generates more innovative ideas than a homogeneous one.”

Brain signals

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

KIMT/CBS 3 (Rochester, Minn.) aired a story in which Jodi Tommerdahl, a UTA associate professor in the College of Education, was interviewed about collaboration with the Colleges of Science, Engineering and School of Social Work. The research is focused on identifying brain signals associated with anger. The goal is to build a wearable device that would help violent offenders manage the emotions that often get them into trouble. The story initially appeared on KTVT/CBS 11.

Interdisciplinary research

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

KTVT/CBS 11 interviewed Jodi Tommerdahl, a UTA associate professor in the College of Education, about research collaboration with UTA's Colleges of Science, Engineering and School of Social Work that is focused on identifying brain signals associated with anger. The goal is to build a wearable device that would help violent offenders manage the emotions that often get them into trouble. A web version of the story appears at CBSDFW.com. KOTV/CBS 6 (Tulsa, Okla.) and WBBA/ABC 7 (Jackson, Tenn.) aired segments of the CBS 11 broadcast.

SEIR building

Monday, May 16, 2016

The UT System Board of Regents approved the design of the new 220,000-square-foot Science and Engineering Innovation and Research building, which will enable UTA to serve more students and expand its health science focus, KRLD/1080 AM reported.

Measuring brain function

Monday, May 2, 2016

George Kondraske, founding director of UTA’s Human Performance Institute, was cited in a Pittsburg Post-Gazette as a developer of RC21X, a web-based program that measures brain function -- especially useful for football players who have experienced game-related head injuries. A recent appellate court ruling upholding a National Football League settlement with retired players could be a boon to RC21X.

April

Faculty Entrepreneurship

Friday, April 29, 2016

Fort Worth Business reported that UTA-founded VisioSound Inc. is among four new companies that recently joined TECH Fort Worth’s Smart Start program as they prepare to launch their products. VisioSound is dedicated to developing personalized tools for foreign language learning using technology available on every smartphone and tablet.

Flexible transistors

Friday, April 22, 2016

LabManager, ECNMag.com and KurzweilAI.net reported that Weidong Zhou, an UTA electrical engineering professor, has collaborated with University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers to pioneer a unique method that could allow manufacturers to easily and cheaply fabricate high-performance transistors with wireless capabilities on huge rolls of flexible plastic.

Pain help

Thursday, April 21, 2016

RYortho.com reported on research by UTA professors Yuan Peng and J.-C. Chiao that demonstrates that electrical stimulation of the deep brain structures under the cortex could ease chronic pain. Their results were published in the leading neuroscience journal Experimental Brain Research.

UT System honors

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Two University of Texas at Arlington professors have been honored as 2016 Fellows of the UT System Academy of Distinguished Teachers, MyArlingtonTX, the news site of the City of Arlington, reported. Kevin Schug, Shimadzu Distinguished Professor of Analytical Chemistry, and Barbara Shipman, associate professor of mathematics and a UTA Distinguished Teaching Professor, will be inducted into the Academy on April 19.

Fact checking

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Checking politicians' statements just got easier thanks to Claimbuster, a Guardian opinion article wrote. Claimbuster is a statement fact-checking research project led by UTA Computer Science Engineering Associate Professor Chengkai Li, in collaboration with journalism experts and computer scientists from Duke, Stanford and Google Research.

Computational predictions

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

The University of Texas at Arlington and the UTA Research Institute will develop state-of-the-art computational methodologies to predict the strength and life of rotor blade assemblies, known as rotor spars, through a new $1 million NASA agreement, JECComposites.com reported.

Grad programs

Monday, April 18, 2016

U.S. News & World Report ranked more than 20 graduate programs at the University of Texas at Arlington among the nation’s best in the magazine’s 2017 edition of “Best Graduate Schools,” reported Fort Worth Business. UTA has top 100 graduate programs in seven colleges and schools including engineering, nursing, science, architecture, planning and public affairs, and social work.

NASA agreement

Monday, April 18, 2016

Topix.com reported that The University of Texas at Arlington and the UTA Research Institute will develop state-of-the-art computational methodologies to predict the strength and life of rotor blade assemblies, known as rotor spars, through a new $1 million NASA agreement.

Seeking sustainable solutions

Friday, April 15, 2016

The International Solid Waste Association held its winter school in January 2016 at The University of Texas at Arlington and its lab at the city of Denton landfill, The Global Methane Initiative Blog reported. Solid waste professionals from 27 countries participated in the school, which focused on sustainable waste management of landfills.

Alleviating pain

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

A new UTA study has found that electrical stimulation of a deep, middle brain structure blocks pain signals at the spinal cord level — no drugs involved, Orthopedics This Week reported. In addition, say the researchers, the process also triggers the release of beneficial dopamine, which may reduce the emotional distress associated with long-term pain.

Something 'sew' wonderful

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Aman Li, a longtime Arlington tailor, has become the Texas Rangers emergency tailor for big and small jobs, the Star-Telegram reported. Li first came to the U.S. to pursue an industrial engineering degree at UTA.

Pain control

Monday, April 11, 2016

UTA researchers are working on using an implantable wireless electrical stimulation device to better control pain, Digital Trends and several other websites reported.

Gas-to-liquids technology

Monday, April 11, 2016

UMED Holdings Inc., through its wholly owned subsidiary Greenway Innovative Energy Inc. has committed $750,000 to establish the F. Conrad Greer Lab at The University of Texas at Arlington where a small scale version of its gas-to-liquids conversion unit will be constructed, New Tech Magazine reported.

Lab dedicated to gas-to-liquids technology

Friday, April 8, 2016

UMED Holdings Inc., through its wholly owned subsidiary Greenway Innovative Energy Inc., has committed $750,000 to establish the F. Conrad Greer Lab at The University of Texas at Arlington where a small-scale version of its gas-to-liquids conversion unit will be constructed, Yahoo! Finance and other media organizations reported.  

Shockwave impact

Friday, April 8, 2016

Aviation Week reported that a research team that includes UTA, Old Dominion University and Purdue University will study unforeseen brain trauma that accompanies bomb blasts. The U.S. Office of Naval Research wants to expand understanding of how shockwaves’ impact affect the brain.

Water well concerns

Friday, April 8, 2016

A WFAA-TV/News 8 (ABC) investigation about well water concerns in Chisholm Springs, located in the heart of the Barnett Shale, noted a UTA report by respected scientists. Their study showed that hundreds of private water wells in the Barnett Shale are contaminated with fracking-related chemicals. Residents said in the past few months, they’ve experienced dizzying smells, discoloration in their water, burning skin, and rashes that they believe are due to water impacted by gas drilling-related contamination. State officials are investigating and say they hope to have some answers soon. The story also appears online at WFAA.com.

ClaimBuster

Thursday, April 7, 2016

A Poynter.org article about teaching computers how to spot lies noted that computer scientists at UTA, working with the Duke Reporters' Lab and computer scientists from Duke and Google, have created a site called ClaimBuster that is designed to flag statements that are worth checking.

Alleviating pain

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Science Daily, Science Codex, Health.am, HealthCanal and Novostiplaneti (Russia) reported on research by UTA professors Yuan Peng and J.-C. Chiao that demonstrates that electrical stimulation of the deep brain structures under the cortex could ease chronic pain. Their results were published in the leading neuroscience journal Experimental Brain Research.

Digitizing anger

Friday, April 1, 2016

J.-C. Chiao, Peter Lehmann, Anne Nordberg, Yuan Bo Peng, Jodi Tommerdahl and Shouyi Wang, representing collaboration among the College of Engineering, the College of Education, the College of Science and the School of Social Work, are working to develop new technology that can tell a person he or she is getting angry before they realize it, KXAS NBC5 Online and ewallstreeter.com reported. The project is a result of the UTA Interdisciplinary Research Program.

March

UTA center honored

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

The Construction Research Center, a nonprofit organization based at UTA, bestowed an award on Michael Arellano, the Chief Building Official of Coppell, to commemorate his contributions to the city, Coppell Student Media reported. The Center annually bestows an award for the often-overlooked contributions of building officials and inspectors to towns and cities.

Alternative fuels

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Frederick MacDonnell, a professor and chair of the UTA Department of Chemistry, and Brian Dennis, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, were featured on KTVT/CBS 11 discussing their process to convert carbon dioxide and water directly into renewable diesel fuels. The story also mentioned other research converting natural gas into liquid fuels.

Ready for robotics

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Carter Tiernan, assistant dean in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at UTA, was featured in a Dallas Morning News article on the Sunset High School Robo*Flash robotics team, which features members with disabilities. “I would expect that their participation is hampered by the … idea that only ‘smart’ students or students who ‘like math’ or students who already know how to use technology can really do robotics,” Tiernan said. “None of these ideas is true.”

UTA Smart Care Apartment

Friday, March 25, 2016

DZone mentioned the UTA Smart Care Apartment in an article about smart homes helping the elderly maintain independence. The apartment uses smart technology to enhance independent living by the elderly and disabled.

Students place second

Friday, March 25, 2016

UTA students placed second in the Student Chapter Presentation Awards at the North American Society for Trenchless Technology 2016 No-Dig Show, NASTT.org reported.

National rankings

Thursday, March 17, 2016

The Texas Tribune reported on U.S. News and World Report's annual rankings of the nation's universities. The rankings showed UTA's College of Engineering moving up to No. 82 nationwide. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Houston Chronicle, San Antonio Express-News and several other media outlets published similar stories.

Creating synthetic fuel out of CO2, water

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

American Society for Engineering Education's First Bell highlighted the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's article about UTA researchers developing a one-step process to convert carbon dioxide and water to liquid fuel like gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. ASEE has more than 12,000 members worldwide, which include about 400 engineering and engineering technology colleges and affiliates, more than 50 corporations, numerous government agencies and professional associations.

New energy source

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

A UTA researching team has developed a one-step process to convert carbon dioxide and water to liquid hydrocarbons like gasoline, jet fuel and diesel, the Star-Telegram reported. The work of Frederick MacDonnell, a professor and chair of the UTA Department of Chemistry; and Brian Dennis, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has put them at the head of the global race for the holy grail of a green economy: an affordable and efficient process to make fuel out of the primary greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide.

Shock wave research

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Navy researchers have entered a partnership with Michael Cho, who chairs the UTA Bioengineering Department, to study the popping of tiny bubbles called microcavitations caused by shock waves, the Providence Journal's Veterans Journal reported. Cho believes that these events can damage blood vessels in the brain, leading to memory loss, headaches and possibly post-traumatic stress disorder.

Extraordinary achievement

Monday, March 14, 2016

February 2016 saw four Pakistanis distinguish themselves with extraordinary achievements in the fields of science, technology and arts, Pakistan Today reported. One of those was UTA's Samir Iqbal, an associate professor in the Electrical Engineering Department, who is developing a device that would detect cancer in its early stages.

Shockwave study

Friday, March 11, 2016

The official U.S. Defense Department Science blog, Armed with Science, featured a story about Michael Cho, professor and chair of UTA’s Bioengineering Department, who with support from the Office of Naval Research is conducting research to better understand how explosive shock waves harm the brain and contribute to traumatic brain injury. 

Supercomputing power

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

A researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington is working to develop a framework for a network of simple sensors that could be as powerful as a supercomputer, but smaller and less costly, Topix reported. Ioannis Schizas, an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering Department, will create a sensing environment that will use many simple devices to process data that currently requires the use of a supercomputer as part of a three-year, $150,000 National Science Foundation grant.

Pipe examination

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

The city of Arlington recently teamed with The University of Texas at Arlington to embark on a high-tech examination of 48 miles of large-diameter sewer pipelines, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. The project, which will start next month and last three years, will tell city officials much about the lifetime of vital sewer pipes and give the officials a way to isolate smaller areas for replacement. Ali Abolmaali, chair of the UTA civil engineering department and director of the Center for Structural Engineering, is leading the effort.

New imaging

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have determined that light reflectance spectroscopy can differentiate between malignant and benign prostate tissue with 85 percent accuracy, Surgical Products magazine reported. UTA bioengineering professor Hanli Liu contributed to the study.

Brain injury

Monday, March 7, 2016

KCBS/740 AM (Los Angeles) interviewed Michael Cho, professor and chair of UTA’s Bioengineering Department, about research that examines how brain injury from shockwaves could be caused by microcavitation, potentially changing the way doctors look for brain injuries suffered in battle.

Vital pipes

Monday, March 7, 2016

The city of Arlington recently teamed with The University of Texas at Arlington to embark on a high-tech examination of 48 miles of large-diameter sewer pipelines, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. The project, which will start next month and last three years, will tell city officials much about the lifetime of vital sewer pipes and give the officials a way to isolate smaller areas for replacement. 

Hall of Achievement

Monday, March 7, 2016

The Fort Worth Business Newsmakers column noted that Krish Prabhu, president of AT&T Labs and chief technology officer, has been named to The University of Texas at Arlington’s Engineering Hall of Achievement and appointed a research professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. 

Better imaging

Friday, March 4, 2016

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have determined that light reflectance spectroscopy can differentiate between malignant and benign prostate tissue with 85 percent accuracy, Prostate Cancer News Today reported. UTA bioengineering professor Hanli Liu contributed to the study.

CAREER grant

Thursday, March 3, 2016

The National Science Foundation has awarded a CAREER grant to Ankur Jain, an assistant professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Topix.com reported. Jain will study how heat flows in materials within a lithium ion battery so that those batteries can be used safely in more applications.

Alternative fuel

Thursday, March 3, 2016

UTA chemists and engineers made hydrocarbons by cooking carbon dioxide and water at 180 to 200°C under high pressure, along with a catalyst and ultraviolet radiation from the sun, Hydrocarbon Online and Tech Transfer Central reported.

One-step alternative energy

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

A team of chemists and engineers at UTA has come up with a one-step process to convert carbon dioxide and water into a liquid hydrocarbon fuel, One News Page reported. Their process involves a combination of high-intensity light, high pressure and temperature, and a cheap, abundant catalyst.

Better images

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have determined that light reflectance spectroscopy can differentiate between malignant and benign prostate tissue with 85 percent accuracy, eScienceNews reported. UTA bioengineering professor Hanli Liu contributed to the study.

AT&T exec joining faculty

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Pennychaser.com reported that Krish Prabhu, president of AT&T Labs and chief technology officer, has been named to the UTA Engineering Hall of Achievement and appointed as a research professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

Brain injury research

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

The Daily Beast reported that Michael Cho, professor and chair of UTA’s Bioengineering Department, is researching how brain injury from shockwaves could be caused by microcavitation, potentially changing the way doctors look for brain injuries suffered in battle. The article also interviewed Timothy Bentley, a program manager at the Office of Naval Research, who helped direct Navy funding to Cho’s research.

Big data

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Krish Prabhu, president of AT&T Labs and chief technology officer, has been named to the UTA Engineering Hall of Achievement and appointed as a research professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, KLTV ABC 7  in Tyler; KSLA CBS 12 in Shreveport, La.; WTOL CBS 11 in Toledo, Ohio; KXVO CW 15 in Omaha, Neb.; KHNL NBC 13 in Honolulu, Hawaii, KFMB CBS 8 in San Diego, Calif.; and various other media outlets reported.

February

Alternative fuel

Monday, February 29, 2016

International Business Times (AU) reported that UTA chemists and engineers made hydrocarbons by cooking carbon dioxide and water at 180 to 200°C under high pressure, along with a catalyst and ultraviolet radiation from the sun. The story also appeared in Energy Options and OneNewsPage. Their work was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Real-time tissue analysis

Monday, February 29, 2016

Science Codex, NewsWise, HealthNewsDigest, Health Canal and ScienceDaily reported that researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have determined that light reflectance spectroscopy can differentiate between malignant and benign prostate tissue with 85 percent accuracy, a finding that may lead to real-time tissue analysis during prostate cancer surgery. UTA bioengineering professor Hanli Liu contributed to the study.

Sleep apnea help

Monday, February 29, 2016

Healthworks Collective mentioned UTA in a list of breakthrough sleep apnea technologies. UTA and UNT Health Science Center researchers have developed a user-friendly system that alerts the individual whenever there’s an airflow leak in their PAP, or positive airway pressure machine.

Sustainable fuels technology

Friday, February 26, 2016

A team of chemists and engineers at The University of Texas at Arlington has come up with a one-step process to convert carbon dioxide and water into a liquid hydrocarbon fuel, Conservation magazine reported. Their process involves a combination of high-intensity light, high pressure and temperature, and a cheap, abundant catalyst.

Science fair students excel

Friday, February 26, 2016

The Hood County News reported that 14 Granbury ISD students excelled at the 65th Fort Worth Regional Science & Engineering Fair at UTA and are advancing to the ExxonMobil Texas Science and Engineering Fair on March 31-April 2 in San Antonio.

Renewable fuels

Thursday, February 25, 2016

The Dallas Morning News reported that UTA chemistry and engineering professors Frederick MacDonnell and Brian Dennis have discovered an environmentally friendly way to create a “crude gasoline mix.” With industrial production in mind, the team used abundant elements rather than rare ones that would drive up costs. The research is documented in the prestigious journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Chemistry honors

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Samir Iqbal, a UTA associate professor of electrical engineering, has been named a Fellow of the prestigious Royal Society of Chemistry, the United Kingdom-based association representing more than 50,000 of the world’s leading chemical scientists, AZO Nano reported.

Smart cushion

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute and Human Engineering Research Laboratories at the University of Pittsburgh are creating an automated seat cushion intended to prevent pressure ulcers in wheelchair users, Phys.org, Medical Design Technology and many other media outlets reported. The $740,000 project, funded through the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program Department of Defense and awarded by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, is focused specifically on relief for wheelchair users whose impairments were caused by spinal cord injuries or other neurological complications. 

Sustainable energy

Thursday, February 25, 2016

A team of UTA chemists and engineers has proven that concentrated light, heat and high pressures can drive the one-step conversion of carbon dioxide and water directly into useable liquid hydrocarbon fuels, Yahoo! Mexico and Kallanish Energy reported.

STEM studies

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Educate Texas, a public-private partnership, announced recently that it has awarded grants for a new statewide initiative that encourages both K-12 and college students to pursue STEM careers, Rambler Newspapers reported. The Texas Regional STEM Degree Accelerator Initiative, in partnership with UTA and other institutions, has been created to increase the number of students who graduate from college with STEM credentials.

Shock wave injuries

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

To better understand how shock waves harm the brain and contribute to traumatic brain injury, the Office of Naval Research’s Warfighter Performance Department is supporting work by Michael Cho, chairman of the UTA Bioengineering Department, Seapower Magazine reported. Cho’s efforts center on the idea that explosive shock waves cause microcavitations, which are tiny bubbles, to form and collapse in the brain. These energy-packed bubbles are so miniscule that they can’t be detected by current technology. Consequently, this kind of injury often goes untreated.

Alternative fuel

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Cosmos magazine reports that UTA chemists and engineers made hydrocarbons by cooking carbon dioxide and water at 180 to 200 °C under high pressure, along with a catalyst and ultraviolet radiation from the sun. The story was also reported by Innovation Toronto and ECN magazine. Their work was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Sustainable fuels technology

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

A team of University of Texas at Arlington chemists and engineers has proven that concentrated light, heat and high pressures can drive the one-step conversion of carbon dioxide and water directly into useable liquid hydrocarbon fuels, Solar Thermal magazine, Science Codex, Phys.org, Nanowerk, ScienceDaily, the Business Standard and other media reported.

Medical hackathon

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Some 150 students from universities round the U.S. converged on UTA for a medical hackathon to propose solutions for cancer, KTVT/CBS 11 reported. Organized by Duby Okonkwo, a UTA bioengineering pre-med junior, “Hack the Health” brought together students from different disciplines for three days of discussion around a specific problem related to cancer.

Cancer cell detection tool

Monday, February 22, 2016

Samir Iqbal, a University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineer, has developed a novel cancer cell detection method that will improve early diagnosis through a tool that tracks cellular behavior in real time using nanotextured walls that mimic layers of body tissue, In Compliance magazine and Electronic Products.com reported.  

Summer science camp

Friday, February 19, 2016

The ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp announced Thursday that it has opened its application process for students to participate in summer sessions on college campuses around the country, CNBC.com, WAFB 9 in Baton Rouge, La., InvestorPoint, Yahoo! Finance and several other websites reported. For more than 10 years, the program has attracted rising and current middle-school students who want to experience college life while learning about science, technology, engineering and math. UTA is one of the 10 college campuses on which the camp is held.

CAREER milestone

Friday, February 19, 2016

Yi Hong, a UTA assistant professor of bioengineering, has won a five-year, $500,000 National Science Foundation Early Career Development, or CAREER, Program grant to create conductive, single-component and biodegradable elastomers, MDT.com reported. Hong's technology is an advancement over conventional conductive polymers that are very stiff, hard to be processed and non-degradable. The newly built scaffold should have several biomedical applications such as tissue repair.

Cancer cell detection tool

Friday, February 19, 2016

Samir Iqbal, a University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineer, has developed a novel cancer cell detection method that will improve early diagnosis through a tool that tracks cellular behavior in real time using nanotextured walls that mimic layers of body tissue, One News Page and BioNews Texas reported.

CAREER milestone

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Yi Hong, a UTA assistant professor of bioengineering, has won a five-year, $500,000 National Science Foundation Early Career Development, or CAREER, Program grant to create conductive, single-component and biodegradable elastomers that will aid in tissue repair, BioPortfolio.com reported.

Cancer cell detection tool

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Samir Iqbal, a University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineer, has developed a novel cancer cell detection method that will improve early diagnosis through a tool that tracks cellular behavior in real time using nanotextured walls that mimic layers of body tissue, The Express Tribune, a product of The New York Times, reported.

Engineer praised

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

A Star-Telegram editorial lauded Jim Nichols, who guided engineering firm Freese and Nichols through a period of tremendous growth. Nichols, an advisor to the UTA College of Engineering, died Thursday at 92.

New cancer detection

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Samir Iqbal, a University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineer, has developed a novel cancer cell detection method that will improve early diagnosis through a tool that tracks cellular behavior in real time using nanotextured walls that mimic layers of body tissue, i4u.com, brandyscynario.com, Pakistani News, The News Tribe, Dawn.com and several other websites reported.

Medical diagnostics

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Samir Iqbal, a University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineer, has developed a novel cancer cell detection method that will improve early diagnosis through a tool that tracks cellular behavior in real time using nanotextured walls that mimic layers of body tissue, Phys.org, One News Page, Select Science, Nanowerk and several other websites reported.

Assessing risks

Monday, February 15, 2016

Anand Puppala, UTA Distinguished Teaching Professor and associate dean for research for the College of Engineering, said work his team is doing at Eagle Mountain Lake could be used to assess risk at other dams once more data is collected, The Dallas Morning News reported in a story about proposed gas drilling at Lake Lewisville. However, Puppala said the ground is different at different lake locations.

Research partner

Monday, February 15, 2016

UTA’s Center for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education was mentioned as a research partner with the National Association of Sewer Service Companies, Underground Construction reported.

Laser efficiency

Monday, February 15, 2016

An ultrathin semiconductor laser under development at UTA can be integrated with mainstream electronics on the same silicon substrate with increased capacity and energy efficiency, photonics.com and BioNews Texas reported. Professor Weidong Zhou has received $1.5 million in grants to advance lab-on-a-chip technology. 

Concrete show lauds UTA study

Thursday, February 11, 2016

New advances in concrete chemistry were on display at the World of Concrete show in Las Vegas recently, the Engineering News-Record reported. Chemical giant BASF was touting the recent results of its strength tests on concrete pipe, bolstered by a UTA study that used synthetic macrofibers instead of more traditional means.

Sun's NSF grant on lasers

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Yuze "Alice" Sun, a UTA bioengineering assistant professor, received a National Science Foundation grant from for research on lasers that would better detect indicators of disease, Photonics.com and AZO Optics reported. Sun’s research aims to apply laser technology to detect biomarkers, molecules specifically associated with diseases, in minute fluid samples, like those used on lab-on-a-chip devices.

Laser advancement

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Yuze "Alice" Sun, a UTA bioengineering assistant professor, received a National Science Foundation grant from for research on lasers that would detect indicators of disease, Science Business reported. Sun’s research aims to apply laser technology to detect biomarkers, molecules specifically associated with diseases, in minute fluid samples, like those used on lab-on-a-chip devices.

Data center efficiencies

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

UTA is part of a team receiving a $1.1 million grant to support Villanova University’s Center for Energy Smart Electronic Systems, WFIE 14 in Evansville, Ill.; KUSI in San Diego, Calif.; WALB 10 in Albany, Ga.; and many other media outlets reported. In addition to UTA and Villanova, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Binghamton University, the lead university on the project, are in the Collaborative Research Cluster Partnership along with  several companies. The goal of the partnership is to generate more reliable, renewable and more efficient power for data centers.

ClaimBuster

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

A Fort Worth Star-Telegram editorial called a new UTA fact-checking tool intriguing. Chengkai Li, a UTA associate professor of computer science and engineering, is using a device to check claims in political debates, getting closer to automated fact-checking. 

Liu receives top honor

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Hanli Liu, a UTA bioengineering professor, has been named a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering for her work in medical instrumentation and imaging, the Dallas Business Journal reported.

Better cancer detection

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Medical News Today reported on recent improvements to DNA technology for detecting and treating disease. The research of Samir Iqbal, a UTA associate professor of electrical engineering, was highlighted. His research involves using electronic chips coated with RNA aptamers to better detect cancer and other diseases.

CMAS Technology Lab

Monday, February 8, 2016

General Motors partnered with the League of United Latin American Citizens to open a new technology center on the UTA campus, KXAS NBC 5 reported. Students and community members will be able to use the space to learn more about science, technology, engineering and math. Saturday, LULAC, GM and UTA held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the lab, KUSI 9 in San Diego, Calif., WWBT NBC 12 in Richmond, Va., WTOL 11 NBC in Toledo, Ohio, and many other media outlets reported.

Electromagnetic fields

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Erick Jones, a UTA professor of industrial, manufacturing and systems engineering, participated in a study led by UT Dallas that demonstrated that energy from cellphone towers amplifies pain in amputees, Science Daily and Stone Hearth News reported. This is one of the first studies to look at the effects of electromagnetic fields in a nerve-injury model. 

App challenge

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Taylor Johnson, a UTA assistant professor of computer science and engineering, and David Levine, a UTA senior lecturer of computer science and engineering, judged Townview School of Business and Management students during the annual Congressional App Challenge reception at El Centro Community College, Dallas ISD’s The HUB reported. Congressman Marc Veasey, D-Fort Worth, also attended the event.

UTA alum noted

Thursday, February 4, 2016

UTA alumna and astronaut Kalpana Chawla was noted in a NYSEPost article on the Columbia Space Shuttle explosion. Chawla completed her master’s of science in aerospace engineering at UTA in 1984. Feb. 1 marked 13 years since the shuttle tragedy.

Ultra-thin semiconductor laser

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Weidong Zhou, an UTA electrical engineering professor, is developing a new type of ultra-thin semiconductor laser that can be integrated with mainstream electronics on the same silicon substrate for increased speed, capacity and efficiency, Phys.org, Nanowerk, (e) Science News, Electronic Component News and ASEE First Bell reported. The research is supported by a three-year, $600,000 grant from the U.S. Army Research Office and a three-year, $935,000 grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

UTA named to top group

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

UTA was named in the elite group of R-1: Doctoral Universities - Highest Research Activity by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, Reuters, Dallas Business Journal, Austin Business Journal, Education Dive and more than 100 other media sites reported. With this new classification, UTA joins a distinguished group of 115 institutions including Harvard, MIT and Johns Hopkins in the highest research or R-1 category.

Structural problems

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Simon Chao, a UTA structural engineer in the Civil Engineering Department, said the destruction that a Red Oak ISD elementary school sustained during a recent tornado should have never happened, Fox 4/KDFW reported. Chao said school districts should ensure that the walls in their schools are built properly.

Landfill mining

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Sahadat Hossain, a UTA civil engineering professor, was interviewed on KDFW FOX4’s Fox4ward segment about his work with the city of Denton on landfill mining. Hossain’s research will recycle already buried refuse to recycle it or decompose it further to produce methane gas, which can be used to power Denton homes. Hossain said the research could become a standard for cities across the globe as they could greatly increase the life of their landfills. 

Measuring brain performance

Monday, February 1, 2016

Dr. George Kondraske, director of UTA's Human Performance Institute, worked with Pittsburg company RC21X to develop a web-based tool used to assess brain performance following trauma, RC21X executives told WPXI NBC5 (Pittsburg, Pa.). The tool is already used by sports teams to assess athletes following concussions.

January

UTA inventors

Friday, January 29, 2016

With three new National Academy of Inventors fellows, UTA is one step closer to becoming a Tier One university, Fort Worth Weekly reported. The story said: “When Vistasp Karbhari became president of The University of Texas at Arlington in 2013, he made it clear that he wanted the school to be categorized as Tier One, a status afforded to nationally recognized research facilities such as Texas A&M University, Rice University and the University of Texas at Austin. He is now three steps closer to achieving that goal.”

Shockwave research

Friday, January 29, 2016

BioNews Texas reported on UTA Bioengineering Chair Michael Cho’s $1.24 million navy grant to show how shockwaves injure the brains of soldiers in battle. The article also mentioned the recent appointment of Jon Weidanz, whose field of expertise is in cancer diagnostic and treatment products, as associate vice president for research and professor of biology to strengthen the school’s health science initiatives.

UTA alum appointed

Friday, January 29, 2016

UTA alumna Laura Sullivan has been appointed by Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder to the Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee to set in place long-term solutions to Flint’s water system, RealEstateRama and Michigan.gov reported. Sullivan earned a master’s degree and a doctorate in materials science and engineering from UTA.

Landfill mining

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Sahadat Hossain, a UTA civil engineering professor, is working with the City of Denton to produce more energy through closed landfill cells in a project that mines already buried refuse, SolidWaste.com reported. The work is supported through a three-year, $399,806 Denton grant. It is the first ever landfill mining project in Texas and first-ever landfill mining project as part of a sustainable waste management system in the country. 

Landfill mining

Friday, January 22, 2016

ASEE First Bell reported on “landfill mining” research led by UTA civil engineering professor Sahadat Hossain that could improve solid waste management on a global scale. Hossain’s team is testing new methods for speeding up the rate at which garbage decomposes while determining whether long buried materials can now be recycled. Researchers also are working to boost the amount of gas generated in the landfill process so that more can be used to power homes. The story initially appeared on KTVT/CBS 11 and KXAS/NBC 5.

Reusable resource

Friday, January 22, 2016

WasteDive reported that UTA and the City of Denton are partnering on the first landfill-mining project in Texas, hoping to discover that the space can be leveraged as a viable, reusable resource.

ClaimBuster tool

Friday, January 22, 2016

Poynter.org noted several projects around the world that are exploring ways to make fact-checking faster and smarter through the use of technology. Among the projects, The University of Texas at Arlington has developed a tool called ClaimBuster that can analyze long transcripts of debates and suggest sentences that could be fact-checked.

Landfill mining

Thursday, January 21, 2016

KXAS/NBC 5 and KTVT/CBS 11 reported on “landfill mining” research led by UTA civil engineering professor Sahadat Hossain that could improve solid waste management on a global scale. Hossain’s team is testing new methods for speeding up the rate at which garbage decomposes while determining whether long buried materials can now be recycled. Researchers also are working to boost the amount of gas generated in the landfill process so that more can be used to power homes. Web versions of the broadcast stories also appear at NBCDFW.com and CBSDFW.com.

Alternative power

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Sahadat Hossain, a UTA civil engineering professor, is working with the City of Denton to produce more energy through closed landfill cells in a project that mines already buried refuse, Phys.org reported. The work is supported through a three-year, $399,806 Denton grant. It is the first ever landfill mining project in Texas and first-ever landfill mining project as part of a sustainable waste management system in the country.

Concrete research

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

The Journal of Engineering published the research article, “An Experimental Study for Quantitative Estimation of Rebar Corrosion in Concrete Using Ground Penetrating Radar,” by Nur Yazdani, a UTA professor of engineering and research assistant Md Istiaque Hasan. The paper detailed an investigation into the relationship between the amount of reinforced concrete corrosion and GPR maximum positive amplitude.

Aerospace research reviewed

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

The work of UTA’s Luca Maddalena was highlighted on theAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ High Speed Air Breathing Technical Committee website under a 2015 year-in-review report. Maddalena, an associate professor in the Mechancial and Aerospace Engineering Department, and his team were awarded a $1.01 million federal research grant last year to build the country’s only university-based, arc-heated, hypersonic-testing facility for thermal protection systems.

Chancellor mentions Cho research

Monday, January 11, 2016

In a recent UT System blog post, Chancellor William McRaven highlighted research by Michael Cho, professor and chair of UTA’s Bioengineering Department. Cho is leading an effort to better understand brain injuries among veterans caused by shockwaves from explosions. UT Matters blog also shared the post.

Flagging statements

Monday, January 11, 2016

The Dallas Sun reported on Claimsbuster, a database query system that flags politicians’ statements by level of importance and helps identify claims that should be verified. The system is being developed by Chengkai Li, UTA computer science engineering professor, with Duke and Stanford universities through a National Science Foundation grant.

UTA faculty named to NAI

Monday, January 11, 2016

Fort Worth Business noted that three additional UTA faculty members have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors for a total of 13, the highest number for a Texas university and the second-highest number in the nation. The 2015 class will include UT Arlington’s Duane Dimos, vice president for research; David Nygren, Presidential Distinguished Professor of Physics; and Kenneth Reifsnider, Presidential Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. The new fellows will be inducted April 15 as part of the academy’s fifth annual conference in Washington, D.C.

Math, CSE grants

Monday, January 11, 2016

Fort Worth Business reported that the UTA departments of mathematics and computer science and engineering received a total of $1.5 million for two U.S. Department of Education grants to help students earn doctoral degrees in areas of national need.

Claimbuster

Friday, January 8, 2016

KXAS NBC 5 reported on Claimsbuster, a database query system being developed by a UTA computer science engineering professor that flags politicians’ statements by level of importance and helps identify claims that should be verified. Associate professor Chengkai Li is developing the system with Duke and Stanford universities through a National Science Foundation grant.

Checking the brain

Friday, January 8, 2016

Michael Cho, professor and chair of UTA’s Bioengineering Department, is leading a collaborative team with researchers at Old Dominion University, Purdue University and the UTA Research Institute to determine for the first time in real time the mechanisms that cause symptoms of traumatic brain injuries due to blast shockwaves, Rare reported.

Respiratory motion system

Friday, January 8, 2016

RT Magazine reported that Shouyi Wang, an assistant professor in UTA’s Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department and a data analytics expert, is working to develop a new, personalized respiratory-motion system that leads to a clearer, more precise image of the tumor to be destroyed.

Concrete pipe sustainability

Friday, January 8, 2016

ASTM reported that a new standard will support the sustainability and resiliency of concrete pipes that are reinforced by synthetic fibers. The new standard describes a strong and durable option that can be used for underground piping. Ali Abolmaali (Dr. Tseng Huang Endowed Professor and UTA Civil Engineering Department Chair) was quoted in the article saying, “Although these pipes are buried underground – where they’re not seen and seldom thought of – they help provide a safe and healthy environment for the public.”

Brain injuries

Thursday, January 7, 2016

KTVT CBS 11 interviewed Michael Cho, UTA professor and chair of the Bioengineering Department, about his research efforts in understanding brain injuries in hundreds of thousands of military veterans. “If we are successful we should have a clear understanding of the physiological mechanisms that are responsible for causing this micro-sized damage to the brain,” Cho said.

Revealing thermal characteristics

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Automation.com reported that Ankur Jain, UTA assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the Microscale Thermophysics Laboratory, is using FLIR cameras to reveal thermal characteristics of microelectronic devices. “Thermal phenomena in devices of interest to us occur very rapidly, and we need full field information as opposed to single-point measurements,” Dr. Ankur Jain said.

New blood sugar testing research

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

ASEE First Bell reported that Kyungsuk Yum, UTA assistant professor of materials science and engineering, is developing an internal nanotechnology device to simplify blood sugar testing.

Laser gene therapy

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Medical News Today and International Business Times (Australia) reported that UTA physicists have developed a new platform that uses ultrafast near-infrared lasers to deliver gene therapy to damaged areas of the retina to enable vision restoration in patients with photo-degenerative diseases.

Student coding contest

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

UTA student Cameron Moreau is among 21 semi-finalists in Pearson’s third annual Student Coding Contest, eCampusNews reported. The 2015 contest places an emphasis on recruiting college students and teams to develop original groundbreaking learning applications that integrate with Pearson Application Programming Interfaces or APIs.

Better imaging

Monday, January 4, 2016

Shouyi Wang, an assistant professor of industrial, manufacturing and systems engineering in the UTA College of Engineering, is working to develop a new, personalized respiratory-motion system that leads to a clearer, more precise image of the tumor to be destroyed, reported Congoo News and Medical Xpress. Wang is the principal investigator on a three-year, $250,000 National Science Foundation grant supporting the research.

Glucose reading device

Monday, January 4, 2016

Kyungsuk Yum, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at UTA, is developing an internal nanotechnology device to simplify blood sugar testing, reported BioNews Texas. Yum is developing the device with support from a $100,000 Texas Medical Research Collaborative grant.

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