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Engineering in the News News & Events

Engineering in the News

April

Unmanned vehicles certification

Monday, April 14, 2014

UT Arlington officials say a booming industry in need of skilled workers has motivated them to launch a new unmanned vehicle systems certification program for undergraduates next fall, according to a KXAS/NBC 5 story that appeared on local NBC news programs in several cities, including Miami; Yakima, Wash.; Sacramento, Calif.; and Colorado Springs, Colo. “We anticipate a rather intense interest in it,” said Khosrow Behbehani, dean of the College of Engineering. UT Arlington’s program will be particularly unique because it is one of just a handful of universities across the country that has been given permission by the federal government to test drones outdoors.

Tissue engineering

Monday, April 14, 2014

Dr. Liping Tang, bioengineering chair and professor at UT Arlington, and Dr. Joseph Borrelli, chair of orthopedics at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital, are working together to solve the problem of healing bone fractures and augmenting bone growth after osteomyelitis, BioNews Texas, Stem Cell News Blog and Innovation Toronto reported. Their new technique, which is detailed in the journal PLoS One, cuts down on cost and surgery time, and enhances patient comfort. 

Creating bone tissue

Friday, April 11, 2014

Several online publications, including R&D Magazine, Science Newsline and NanoWerk, reported on a UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital project to investigate whether bone grown from the body’s own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting. Liping Tang, UT Arlington bioengineering chair and professor, and Dr. Joseph Borrelli, chair of orthopedics for Texas Health Arlington Memorial, hope to use the body’s own healing capacity in bone repair.

Unmanned Vehicle Systems certificate program

Thursday, April 10, 2014

UT Arlington is gearing up to meet the expected growth in the unmanned vehicle systems industry with a new certificate program, according to a report on KRLD/1080 AM. Eileen Clements, director of research at the UT Arlington Research Institute, told the station: “The market’s huge ... You need people who know how to design those systems, who know how to operate them, who know how to maintain them.”

Bone repair

Thursday, April 10, 2014

UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital are investigating whether bone grown from the body’s own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting, according to Hispanic Business.com. Liping Tang, UT Arlington bioengineering chair and professor, and Dr. Joseph Borrelli, chair of orthopedics for Texas Health Arlington Memorial, co-authored a paper on the research. The goal is to use the body’s own healing capacity in bone repair.

Repairing the road

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, is working with the Texas Department of Transportation to mend failing highway slopes with recycled plastic pins, NTX, the North Texas Commission Magazine (p. 56), reported in its spring/summer edition. 

Odd couples

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Several FOX television stations, including WXIX/FOX 19(Cincinnati), mentioned a story that dispelled the idea that opposites attract. The story, which originally appeared on CNN.com, featured research by William Ickes, distinguished professor of psychology at UT Arlington. Ickes said that similar people are more likely to get together in the first place -- and are also more likely to find satisfaction in their relationship.

Automation Technology Expo

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Dan Popa, associate professor of electrical engineering at UT Arlington, will be a guest speaker at a Learning Labs seminar that is part of the upcoming Automation Technology Expo Texas in Fort Worth, Aerospace Journal, Virtual Strategy magazine and numerous others reported.  Popa will speak as part of a session called "Robotic Technology: Strategic Applications in Manufacturing."

Possibilities behind micro-windmills

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Tribology & Lubrication Technology magazine (p.8) featured a story on the energy generating micro-windmills being developed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor. The magazine is published by the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers and read by 4,000 professionals worldwide.

Confined spaces

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Jackson Pettyjohn, a manager in UT Arlington’s Division for Enterprise Development, was featured in the April issue of Underground Construction, discussing how to develop a safety program for confined spaces. He said confined spaces represent one of the most challenging and potentially dangerous scenarios in construction.

Micro manufacturing systems featured

Monday, April 7, 2014

Dan Popa, associate professor of electrical engineering at UT Arlington, was featured on the website Micro Manufacturing explaining how manufacturers deal with adhesive forces that act on the surfaces of objects. Popa is head of the Next Generation Systems Research Group at UT Arlington, which researches best practices in designing microscale manufacturing systems.

Micro-windmill research highlighted

Friday, April 4, 2014

German magazine blog, 123energie, reported on tiny windmills being constructed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor. The team believes the devices could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. 

March

Tiny windmills could power cell phones

Monday, March 31, 2014

Two UT Arlington engineers have invented tiny, working windmills, Fresh Photons.com reported. They propose creating a field of these windmills on a cell phone sleeve, and using them to recharge cell phone batteries.

Friday, March 28, 2014

The mayors of Fort Worth, Dallas and Houston Thursday announced their support for a high-speed rail route between Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. “Building in the urban core will cost more than between cities,” said Steve Mattingly, a University of Texas at Arlington civil engineer who conducted a feasibility study for bringing bullet trains into Dallas-Fort Worth when speaking to the Fort Worth Business Press earlier this year.

Powerful possibilites.. mini windmills

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Looking like the buzzing of a hummingbird’s wing, UT Arlington researchers are working on micro-windmills that have many practical applications, Fort Worth, Texas magazine reported. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering J.C. Chiao is the principal investigator on the research but gives major credit to his former student Dr. Smitha Rao. Chiao said: “The major application will be in charging wireless sensors, like those used to safeguard our decaying infrastructure.”

Discovering speed

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

The Discovery Channel (Canada) featured UT Arlington student engineers on its program, Daily Planet. The students interviewed designed and built a racecar with the goal of competing to win the Formula SAE competition. One of the car’s features is Active Aero technology, which uses a student-developed, on-board computer to open or close the “wings” to reduce drag and increase down force to make the car stick to the road. 

UTA alumnus featured

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Winds of Change, a prominent STEM magazine for American Indian and Alaska Native college students and faculty, featured UT Arlington alumnus Ken Vargas in a story about the Navy. The magazine called that branch of the U.S. Armed Forces one of the top 50 STEM workplaces. Vargas serves as a Navy Facilities Engineering Command Contingency/Disaster Preparedness Officer.

Robots in the kitchen

Monday, March 24, 2014

As part of the 2013 Student Infrared Imaging Competition sponsored by DRS Technologies, students from the UT Arlington Research Institute used a PR2 robot from Willow Garage and an infrared camera from DRS Technologies to perform some basic functions in the kitchen, Vision-Systems.com reported.

Emergency responders training on new faster, more precise radar

Friday, March 21, 2014

National Weather Service meteorologists said a local network of more precise radar units provided quicker and more precise information when a storm system rumbled across North Texas on Saturday, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. However, officials said that the full capabilities of the radar system called CASA, for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere, won’t likely be on display until later this year. So far, only two of the $500,000 radar units — one at The University of Texas at Arlington, the other in Midlothian — are fully operational. Four more are expected to be online soon.

Gridlock no more?

Friday, March 21, 2014

North Texas motorists may not realize it, but since October they have traveled a “living laboratory” designed to minimize gridlock and empower commuters, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. Dallas is one of only two cities piloting the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Integrated Corridor Management System. Sia Ardekani, a UT Arlington civil engineering professor who assisted in the project, said his team worked with DART, the North Central Texas Council of Governments, the Texas Department of Transportation, North Texas Tollway Authority and the cities of Dallas, Plano, Richardson and University Park to make their individual transportation systems work seamlessly through the new system.

Rice Business Plan Competition

Friday, March 21, 2014

UT Arlington's Detonation Dynamics team is one of 42 finalists competing in the 14th annual Rice Business Plan Competition, PressReleasePoint reported. The teams are vying for more than $1 million in prizes in the competition, which is sponsored by Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business. More than 155 past competitors have gone on to successfully launch their ventures and are still in business today. They have raised in excess of $844 million in funding and created more than 1,000 new jobs.

More powerful testing for performance-enhancing drugs

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Researchers have developed a new test to detect performance-enhancing drugs that they say are 1,000 times more sensitive than current methods, Science Codex, Newswise, Science Daily and many other websites reported. UT Arlington's Daniel Armstrong, Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry, led the research team that developed the ultra-sensitive methods of detecting the drugs.

Dr. Gupta talks 'prescription for life'

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s prescription for life is to do something that scares you every day, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. Gupta, CNN’s chief medical correspondent told a crowd of about 2,500 at the University of Texas at Arlington Tuesday night that he struggled with communicating when he first started reporting.

Support needed

Monday, March 17, 2014

While the cause of Allen Eagle Stadium construction problems has yet to be determined, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering said the facility likely could need additional support reinforcements to help ensure the concrete’s durability, The Dallas Morning News reported. Shih-Ho “Simon” Chao, who teaches structural engineering at UT Arlington, said the “alligator pattern” of cracks suggest they are due more to support issues than to bad concrete work. That can be addressed by adding additional support beams without a major overhaul of the facility, Chao said.

Student places third in coding contest

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Tracy Oguni, a student at The University of Texas, Arlington, took third place in the recent Pearson Student Coding Contest, according to a press release featured by Virtual-Strategy Magazine, Boston.com, TMC News and others. Oguni developed Study Buddy, an Android application to help students manage the common problem of scheduling their assignments and study time.

Researchers develop device that could answer cell phone charging issues

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Tiny windmills being developed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor could one day provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation, according to the websites TOMO News and MICROManufacturing Magazine. The machines could also power wireless sensors that detect cracks in bridges, failures in security systems and dryness in soils, according to a McClatchy wire service story that appeared on the websites Energy Central and Energy Biz.

Tiny windmills, large possibilities

Monday, March 3, 2014

Millions of tiny windmills could one day power wireless sensors that detect cracks in bridges, failures in security systems and dryness in soils — all thanks to two University of Texas at Arlington research scientists who were inspired by a little girl’s pinwheel, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. Electrical engineering professor J.C. Chiao and associate researcher Smitha Rao designed the 1.8 millimeter by 2 millimeter micro windmills that are so small 10 would fit on a grain of rice. The tiny windmills also could be used to charge smartphones.

Stadium concerns

Monday, March 3, 2014

Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, was quoted in a WFAA/ABC8 story about cracks found in the concrete of Allen ISD’s new football stadium. He said: "Cracking is fairly common in concrete. The problem is the damage water may cause by getting in the cracks." The story also appeared on KHOU/ABC11 (Houston) and KVUE/ABC33 (Austin).

February

Alloy gives strength to micro-windmills

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington is developing tiny windmills that may actually help power electronics, such as cell phones, and in homes, KDFW/FOX 4 reported. J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate, are working on the technology and Chaio explained the micro-manufacturing process for viewers. “They are going to be very cost effective and you can mass produce them,” he said.

Focus on safety

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

UT Arlington has been granted an FAA certificate of authorization, which allows researchers at their research institute (also known as UTARI) to take part in the lone star unmanned aircraft systems initiative, Fort Worth, Texas magazine reported. The initiative has six such programs operating throughout the nation on drone research. They will be helping the Federal Aviation Administration lay out practical rules to safeguard our airspace. 

Middle-school, high-school students converge on UTA for science, engineering fair

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Almost 700 middle and high school students competed at the University of Texas at Arlington’s College Park Center Monday as part of the 63rd annual Fort Worth Regional Science and Engineering Fair, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. After presenting their projects, students participated in on-campus events sponsored by the Office of University Recruitment, College of Science, College of Engineering, RadioShack and Lockheed Martin.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Two UT Arlington engineers have invented tiny, working windmills, according to a post on NPR’s science Tumblr “Skunk Bear." UT Arlington’s J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate, propose creating a field of these windmills on a cell phone sleeve, and using them to recharge cell phone batteries.

Possible power alternative

Monday, February 24, 2014

World Journal, the largest Chinese-language newspaper in the United States, published a story on power-generating micro-windmill technology being developed by UT Arlington’s J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate. The team is working with a Tiawanese company to explore commercialization possibilities for the new technology.

A more diverse field

Friday, February 21, 2014

The Winston-Salem Journal (N.C,) quoted Judy Corley-Lay, a pavement management engineer and the first woman to earn an engineering degree from UT Arlington, in a story about the North Carolina Department of Transportation’s efforts to broaden the base of women engineers. The number of women in the field has grown and will continue to do so she said, but there is still work to be done. There are still very few women in the highest levels of profession, though she expects that will change as the current crop of female engineers gain experience.

NIH grant awarded to Nguyen

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Phys.org noted that Kytai Nguyen, associate professor of bioengineering at UT Arlington, has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nano-particle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stent procedures to treat coronary arterial disease.

Prepping for test flights

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Just weeks after its designation as one of six federally-approved test sites for unmanned aircraft systems, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi will conduct several test flights over South Texas ranchland to continue research and training on the RS-16 unmanned aerial vehicle, In Flight USA reported. The successful test site bid was a team effort involving the UT Arlington Research Institute and other research institutions and private-sector companies.

Impact & influence

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

A Fort Worth Business Press article noted that several UT Arlington faculty members are leading new, innovative engineering research. Anand Puppala, associate dean of research for the College of Engineering, has been named chair of the National Research Council’s soil mechanics unit. Kytai Nguyen, associate professor of bioengineering, has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nano-particle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stent procedures to treat coronary arterial disease. Four UT Arlington Research Institute faculty members have partnered to develop safety systems for unmanned aircraft. The Dallas Morning News County by County section also recognized Nguyen’s work.

Bucks for bullet trains

Monday, February 17, 2014

Ensuring Fort Worth’s place on a proposed high-speed rail line could boil down to dollars and cents as engineers and transportation officials ponder plans that could reshape local and statewide public transit, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. “Building in the urban core will cost more than between cities,” said Stephen Mattingly, a University of Texas at Arlington civil engineer who conducted a feasibility study for bringing bullet trains into Dallas-Fort Worth.

Rail of the future

Friday, February 14, 2014

Texas Public Radio station KSTX (San Antonio) interviewed Stephen Mattingly, a UT Arlington professor of civil engineering, who wrote a recent feasibility study of all the lines that the Texas Department of Transportation is considering for high-speed rail between Dallas-Fort Worth and some other major cities in Texas. “It’s feasible from a technical perspective but not necessarily from a cost perspective,” Mattingly said. ”The I-45 corridor would be suitable for accommodating it. It would struggle in the urban areas, but in the rural areas it would be very adequate for use.”

Energy for tomorrow

Friday, February 14, 2014

A University of Texas Arlington research associate and electrical engineering professor have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging, and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, Homeland Security News Wire reported.

Advanced radar units in North Texas started with one at UTA

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Dallas-Fort Worth is closer to having a ring of advanced radar units up and running when the spring severe-storm season starts, WFAA.com and Government Technology.com reported. A fourth component of the new radar system was installed Tuesday atop a municipal building in Addison. Over the last year, other units have been deployed at The University of Texas at Arlington, at the University of North Texas in Denton and in Mansfield.

New radar units to give advanced warning

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Dallas-Fort Worth is inching closer to having a ring of advanced radar units up and running when the spring severe-storm season starts, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. A fourth component of the new radar system was installed Tuesday atop a municipal building in Addison. Over the last year, other units have been deployed at The University of Texas at Arlington, at the University of North Texas in Denton and in Mansfield.

Engineering influence

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The Dallas Business Journal’s People on the Move column noted that Anand Puppala, UT Arlington Distinguished Teaching Professor of Civil Engineering and associate dean of research engineering, has been named chair of the National Research Council’s soil mechanics unit.

Editorial lauds engineering enrollment increase

Monday, February 10, 2014

The second-largest school in the University of Texas System is educating more Texans than ever before, an editorial in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram said. Preliminary figures released by UT Arlington show a record for in-state enrollment with 34,249 taking classes this spring. “But the most interesting and encouraging part of the report is the dramatic increase in the number of students in the school’s engineering programs,” the editorial said.

Friday, February 7, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures to treat coronary arterial disease, MDT Magazine, NewsWise and many other websites reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, said the research looks to improve an established procedure like angioplasty, which opens arteries and blood vessels that are blocked. The nanoparticles would recruit stem cells to aid in the healing of the arterial walls. She is co-principal investigator with Jian Yang, a bioengineering associate professor at Penn State and a former associate professor here. The article featured Yang's work in biofluorescent polymers.

Friday, February 7, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have designed a micro-windmill that could ultimately power cell phone batteries and other devices, Co.Exist reported. J.-C. Chiao, electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, research associate, developed the system that employs a nickel alloy on the windmill for strength and durability.

New path forward

Thursday, February 6, 2014

In-state enrollment at The University of Texas at Arlington has reached another record high, with 34,249 students taking classes this spring, up 459 from this time last year, according to preliminary figures, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. It is the third straight year that the university, which also reports that 3,652 out-of-state students are enrolled in online courses, has set an enrollment record. Growth this spring is largely attributed to enrollment increases of 768 students, or 19 percent, in the College of Engineering, 137 students, or 9.5 percent, in the School of Social Work and 302 students, or 3.8 percent, in the College of Nursing.

Help for the heart

Thursday, February 6, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures to treat coronary arterial disease, Phys.org, R&D, Stem Cell Therapy, News Medical, Viet Bao Daily News Online and several other websites reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, said the research looks to improve an established procedure like angioplasty, which opens arteries and blood vessels that are blocked. The nanoparticles would recruit stem cells to aid in the healing of the arterial walls.

Upward enrollment

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

The student population at The University of Texas at Arlington has grown beyond 34,000 for the first time, NBC 5/KXAS reported. The university said Tuesday it had 34,329 students enrolled in classes for the Spring 2014 semester. If the number of out-of-state online students are included in the total, that number climbs to nearly 38,000. The school said the population increase is "buoyed by strong growth in the College of Engineering and sustained demand for College of Nursing programs."

Heart healing

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures to treat coronary arterial disease, Nanowerk and Bio-Medicine reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, is leading the research.

Wind equals energy

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have developed a micro-windmill system that could eventually recharge cell phone batteries with a mere wave of the hand-held device, IT Management reported. Electrical Engineering Professor J.-C. Chiao and Research Associate Smitha Rao led the research.

Next generation science

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Four student leaders of the Next Generation Scientists for Biodiesel have added their voices to a cry that biodiesel supporters hope the Environmental Protection Agency hears, AgriMarketing reported. Deval Pandya of UT Arlington serves on the NGSB board and was one of the student authors who submitted comments this week to EPA staff expressing concern about proposed cuts to the federal Renewable Fuel Standard. The NGSB is a student organization designed to assist in the professional development of emerging science leaders with a passion for sustainability by offering opportunities to integrate with the biodiesel scientific community.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Al Jazeera America reported on the Unmanned Vehicles Consortium conference held recently at the UT Arlington Research Institute and focused on the work Frank Lewis, electrical engineering professor, is doing on an unmanned aerial vehicle called the quad-rotor.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system that can shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures performed to treat coronary arterial disease, Hispanic Business and Renewable Energy World reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, said the research looks to improve established procedures used to open blocked arteries and blood vessels. Nguyen’s work also was mentioned in Medical Express and BioTexas News, along with additional work of a co-principal investigator, Jian Yang, a current bioengineering associate professor at Penn State and a former UT Arlington bioengineering associate professor.

Gaining momentum

Monday, February 3, 2014

Kevin Schug, UT Arlington associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, was featured in Momentum, Shimadzu Scientific Instruments' magazine. The article outlined Schug's research on analyzing the environmental effects of extracting shale gas in North Texas and how Shimadzu instruments contribute to his work. Shimadzu has donated more than $10 million to help create the Shimadzu Center for Advanced Analytical Chemistry and the Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies at UT Arlington.

Recharge to the rescue

Monday, February 3, 2014

J.-C. Chiao and Smitha Rao, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor and research associate, respectively, have developed a new micro-windmill technology that could shake up the power industry and make emergency recharges for devices possible, Adafruit Industries reported.

January

Origami and engineering

Friday, January 31, 2014

Micro-windmills that UT Arlington researchers designed could some day be used to charge cell phone batteries and provide temporary power for other devices, Boing Boing and EE Journal reported. J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate, developed the MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) using recesses similar to the way integrated circuits are manufactured combined with the origami-like self-assembly techniques.

Rail green-lighted

Friday, January 31, 2014

The Texas Transportation Commission has given the green light to forming a high-speed rail commission to oversee a bullet train project between Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas Public Radio reported. TxDOT funded Stephen Mattingly, an associate professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, to study the possibility of connecting all major Texas with high speed rail.

The power of a micro-windmill system

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have designed a micro-windmill system that could make emergency recharges for cell phones as easy as blowing on your phone, Wired reported. Professor J.C. Chiao and Research Associate Smitha Rao of UT Arlington have developed a new windmill technology that could shake up the power industry and make emergency recharges possible. Unlike the industrial giants that sit in off-shore windfarms, these diminutive devices measure just 1.8 millimeters at their widest point and 10 could fit on a grain of rice.

High-speed rail plans in Texas

Thursday, January 30, 2014

KHOU/Channel 11 in Houston reported on high-speed rail plans in Texas and quoted Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, who said there is an increasing likelihood of developing such a system. "There is a strong chance that we could see it within 10 years. However, there is no guarantee... and I would not like to see any public money committed to an endeavor like this until we see that it really is going to happen," he said. The story initially appeared on WFAA/ABC 8.

Rallying for a Rail

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, told WFAA/ABC 8 that there is an increasing likelihood that high-speed rail will come to Texas. "There is a strong chance that we could see it within 10 years. However, there is no guarantee... and I would not like to see any public money committed to an endeavor like this until we see that it really is going to happen," said Mattingly, in advance of a Texas high-speed rail commission being established this week. The WFAA story also ran on KVUE in Austin.

Unmanned systems conference

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Fox 4 at Noon reported on Monday's unmanned systems conference at the UT Arlington Research Institute. The conference focused on on unmanned systems well beyond the known military applications. A major workforce development and training grant also was announced. The Research Institute is participating in the Texas test site program for unmanned aerial vehicles.

The power of micro windmills

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have developed miniature windmills that could eventually power cell phone batteries and serve other small-use power needs, ThisWeekInFM.com reported. J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, have produced the working micro-windmills.

Test flights

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute received an FAA certificate of authorization last week as part of its efforts to boost unmanned aerial vehicle research and study, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. UT Arlington and several other universities agreed to become part of the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Initiative, which is led by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. That initiative is part of the nationwide effort to get unmanned aerial vehicles airborne by 2015. The Research Institute and Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation hosted an unmanned vehicle conference Monday. The Dallas Morning News also reported on the daylong conference.

Advancing unmanned systems

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute is part of a statewide push to get in on the ground floor of unmanned vehicle research and technology, KTVT/CBS 11, WFAA/Channel 8 and KDFW/Fox 4 reported. The Research Institute and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation sponsored a daylong conference about unmanned vehicles. The Institute secured an FAA certificate of authorization to fly the unmanned aerial vehicles on that campus.

Conference highlights unmanned systems

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation hosted a conference Monday on unmanned systems, the Associated Press reported. The AP story was carried by ABC 13 and Fox 26 in Houston, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Austin American-Statesman, the San Antonio Express-News, KSLA 12 in Shreveport, La., KXXV 25 in Waco and many other media websites.

Tiny windmills

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have designed a micro-windmill that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, Accessible Technology and TechNet reported. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Powering up

Monday, January 27, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have designed a MEMS-based "micro-windmill" that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, Oilprice.com and ItThing.com reported. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Mass matters

Monday, January 27, 2014

A UT Arlington engineering professor has proven that the effect of mass is important, can be measured and has a significant impact on any calculations and measurements at the sub-micrometer scale, IPS Cell Therapy and Space Daily reported. The findings help to better understand movement of nano-sized objects in fluid environments. The unconventional results are consistent with Newton's Second Law of Motion, a well-established law of physics, and imply that mass should be included in the dynamic model of these nano-systems. The most widely accepted models omit mass at that scale.

Planning for rail

Monday, January 27, 2014

Bill Meadows, a former Fort Worth City Council member, is expected to chair the high-speed rail commission, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. A Star-Telegram editorial said a UT Arlington study laid out several suggested railway routes. The preferred is along I-30 connecting Dallas, Arlington and Fort Worth.

Micro windmill research continues to capture media's attention

Friday, January 24, 2014

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have designed a MEMS-based "micro-windmill" that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, the EE Times said in its Power Week-In-Review. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Bowling's newly published research

Friday, January 24, 2014

BioNews Texas and Space Daily featured research byAlan Bowling, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UT Arlington, and Samarendra Mohanty, an assistant physics professor, on the relationship of mass to calculations at the sub-micrometer scale. Their newly published work says the effect of mass is important, can be measured and has a significant impact on any calculations and measurements.

Micro windmills

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

UT Arlington electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao was interviewed on FOX Business about his work designing a micro-windmill that generates wind energy. Chiao and co-designer Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, believe the devices could be used to charge cell phones or other devices. “You will never run out of energy and you don’t have to go change the battery for those devices,” he said. The websites Electronic Engineering, IT World, Clean Technica, and Technology Tell also reported on the technology.

Need for speed

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

A study by Steve Mattingly, associate professor of civil engineering at UT Arlington, was cited in a Dallas Morning News story focusing on what a high-speed rail system from Dallas to Houston could mean for the environment. Mattingly found the quickest approach for a new system is to put routes along interstate highways.

Alum co-produces new album

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Kelcy Warren, a distinguished alumnus of the UT Arlington College of Engineering, was featured in a Dallas Morning News story about a new album he co-produced called Looking Into You: A Tribute to Jackson Browne. Warren is CEO and chairman of the Fortune 500 titan Energy Transfer Partners.

An energy harvest

Friday, January 17, 2014

UT Arlington research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao have designed a micro-wind turbine that generates power and may become an unusual solution to charging cell phone batteries and other small, wireless, or remote sensing devices, the websites The Blaze and Windpower Engineering & Development reported.  Because of the small sizes, flat panels with thousand of windmills also could be made and mounted on the walls of houses or building to harvest energy for lighting, security, or environmental sensing and wireless communication.

Flying high

Friday, January 17, 2014

About two weeks after winning approval as one of only a handful of federal test sites, researchers from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi are putting their unmanned remote-controlled aircraft, or drones, in the air this week for another round of test flights, according to an Associated Press story. Texas is among six states designated by the Federal Aviation Administration to develop test sites for drones and the UT Arlington Research Institute is a partner on the project.

The power of tiny windmills

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Time magazine’s Tech section reported that researchers at The University of Texas Arlington say they have designed tiny windmills that could hook up to a cellphone and convert wind into battery life. The designers, electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao and graduate research associate Smitha Rao, drew from traditional origami concepts and modern semiconductor device layouts to create the tiny power plants. Websites such as Computerworld, Men’s Fitness, Network World and the Dallas Observer also reported on the research.

Weather Channel, Discovery Canada report on micro-windmill

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Several news outlets, including The Weather Channel, Discovery Canada, Business Insider, eCampusNews and the websites DVice and Inhabitat, featured stories on tiny windmills being developed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor. The team believes the devices could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. Their work also gained attention from additional media based outside the U.S., such as Canadian radio station CJBK/Newstalk 1290 and German website called Mittelstands Nachrichten.

Interaction will be part of research process

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

A new Research and Learning Center at the Forth Worth Science and History Museum brings research from The University of Texas at Arlington to a science venue that is already a favorite with children, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and KERA/90.1 FM reported. Students from UTA or other universities partnering with the program can apply to use the research center to gather data for investigations that touch on the brain and learning, organizers said at an announcement of its opening Tuesday. KXAS/NBC 5 also reported the announcement in their midday report.

FAA test sites for unmanned systems includes UT Arlington Research Institute

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Just weeks after its designation as one of six federally-approved test sites for unmanned aircraft systems, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi will conduct several test flights over South Texas ranch land to continue research and training on the RS-16 unmanned aerial vehicle, according to a General Aviation News story that also mentioned UT Arlington. The successful FAA test site bid was a team effort involving A&M-Corpus Christi, the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute and others.

Micro-windmill technology could help recharge cell phone batteries

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Numerous news outlets, including The Washington Post, San Antonio Express-News, Houston Chronicle, R&D Magazine, Geek.com, Grist and Tech Investor News reported on a UT Arlington team’s development of micro-windmills that could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, are working with a Taiwanese company to explore commercialization possibilities for the new technology.

University, FW Museum team up for learning center

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Today, The University of Texas at Arlington and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History will announce a Research and Learning Center at the museum, a collaboration that allows scientists to engage with the public they study, which will invite museum visitors to participate in short research interactions lasting no more than 15 minutes, according to the Fort Worth Business Press. The project will be guided by the University’s Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education. KXAS/NBC 5 also featured a report this morning on the center's opening.

Forbes, many media outlets report on UT Arlington's micro-windmill

Monday, January 13, 2014

Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and could become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, according to numerous websites, including ForbesElectronic Engineering JournalThe VergeNanotechnology TodayGizmodoCNET and others. UT Arlington has reached an agreement with a Taiwanese company to explore the discovery's commercialization opportunities. KRLD/1080 AM also featured a report on the technology this morning.

University center teaming with Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

Monday, January 13, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History have announced the launch of the Research and Learning Center at the Fort Worth museum. The collaboration allows scientists to interact with the public by enabling museum visitors to participate in short research interactions, the websites PhysOrg and HispanicBusiness.com reported. The Center opens Jan. 14 and is a partnership between the museum and UT Arlington's College of Education. It will be guided by the University's Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education.

Magazine story features student racing innovation

Friday, January 10, 2014

Racecar Engineering magazine prominently featured an article written by Bob Woods, UT Arlington professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and graduate student James Merkel, about the University's Formula Team’s engineering innovation. They detailed how UT Arlington has been at the forefront of innovation "with the introduction of a combined hand clutch and shifter mechanism that allows for two pedals and left foot braking, the first introduction of electronic fuel injection, carbon composite wheels, the first full aero package with multi-element wings, several iterations of unsuspended aero packages, and now the first fully-active four-quadrant aerodynamic package.”

Davis outlines education plan

Friday, January 10, 2014

During an education roundtable Thursday at UT Arlington, state Sen. Wendy Davis unveiled a plan to put more teachers in public classrooms throughout the state, the Associated Press, Texas Tribune, Dallas Morning News, Star-Telegram, Houston Chronicle and other media reported.

High-speed rail study noted

Friday, January 10, 2014

CultureMap Dallas and CultureMap Houston mentioned a UT Arlington study exploring high-speed rail options along the state’s highway system in its story about DFW to Houston high-speed rail study being launched by the federal government.

Professor's high-speed rail study cited

Thursday, January 9, 2014

Dallas Morning News story on a DFW to Houston high-speed rail study being launched by the federal government cited a November study by UT Arlington that examined the feasibility of high-speed rail. The study, conducted by Steve Mattingly, associate professor of civil engineering, showed that high-speed rail was more efficient than air and highway travel - no matter which two big cities you were linking, and it was possible using existing TXDOT right-of-way.

Weighty issues

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Authint Mail noted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering that suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter.

Studying a quicker trip

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

D Magazine’s Frontburner noted research by UT Arlington in its story about a DFW to Houston high-speed rail line study being launched by the federal government and the Texas Department of Transportation. Researchers from UT Arlington conducted a study in November 2013 providing benefits of high-speed trains along major Texas highways. KETK/NBC Tyler and other media outlets carried the story.

Collaboration for health

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

A team of advanced mathematicians from UT Arlington is collaborating with UT Southwestern Medical Center and PCCI, a major scientific partner, to develop clinical prediction models using Bayesian modeling approaches, Reuters.com and other media reported. The National Science Foundation grant project is one of three prestigious grants awarded to UTSW exceeding $30 million.

Bolen's contributions

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

The Star-Telegram highlighted the many contributions of late Fort Worth Mayor Bob Bolen that included bringing the former UT Arlington Advanced Robotics Research Institute to Fort Worth. The city’s longest-serving mayor, known for working 60-hour weeks during his tenure in 1982-91, died early Monday. He was 87.

Earth's measurements

Monday, January 6, 2014

Discovery News.com highlighted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, which suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter. Dark matter is thought to make up about 80 percent of the universe’s matter, but scientists have been unable to determine much else about it, including its presence in the solar system. “The nice thing about GPS satellites is that we know their orbits really, really well,” Harris said. From nine months of data on the satellites in the GLONASS, GPS and Galileo groups, he calculated Earth’s mass as “felt” by each one.

Collaboration noted

Monday, January 6, 2014

Newstalk Texas, a blog of the Texas A&M University Real Estate Center, reported that faculty at The University of Texas at Arlington will participate in Federal Aviation Administration-supported research led by Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi for unmanned aerial systems, a project that will help advance the U.S. drone industry.

Kudos for contest win

Monday, January 6, 2014

The Star-Telegram’s Cheers & Jeers column acknowledged a team of UT Arlington undergraduate engineering students that took first place and a $10,000 prize in an AT&T “It Can Wait” coding contest by creating an app that discourages texting and driving.

Measuring the Earth

Friday, January 3, 2014

New Scientist, Business Standard and UPI.com highlighted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, that suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter. Dark matter is thought to make up about 80 percent of the universe’s matter, but scientists have been unable to determine much else about it, including its presence in the solar system. “The nice thing about GPS satellites is that we know their orbits really, really well,” Harris said. From nine months of data on the satellites in the GLONASS, GPS and Galileo groups, he calculated Earth’s mass as “felt” by each one.

Coding contest win

Thursday, January 2, 2014

A team of UT Arlington undergraduate engineering students took first place and a $10,000 prize in an AT&T “It Can Wait” coding contest by creating an app that discourages texting and driving, the Star-Telegram reported. The team — none of them had taken smart phone programming courses — beat out 25 teams in the second annual AT&T Coding Competition that took place during a 12-week period. The Dallas Morning News also reported on the team’s win.

New fuel method

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Fuel Competition.org and Open Fuel Standard.org noted that a method for creating methanol using CO2 and sunlight, developed at The University of Texas at Arlington, uses very little electrical power and can be "scaled up to an industrial scale to allow some of the CO2 emitted from electrical power plants to be captured and converted into" methanol. This would make electric cars even greener because the CO2 generated for electricity is captured and used.

In the News Archive