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In the News

October

Thursday, October 23, 2014

A University of Texas Arlington associate professor has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to identify insider risk and develop proper protection strategies for information systems within a financial institution, Phys.org and 4-traders.com reported. Jingguo Wang, an associate professor in the Information Systems and Operations Management Department, received a three-year, $157,481 grant that’s part of a larger $499,766 NSF grant with the University of Buffalo.

Improving care

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient’s limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Today’s Medical Developments reported. Haiying Huang, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at UT Arlington’s Research Institute, are collaborating on the project. 

A sustainable future

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A UT Arlington water resources engineer has been awarded a four-year, $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to improve sustainability of large urban areas from extreme weather, urbanization and climate change, Phys.org reported. D.J. Seo, associate professor of water resources engineering in the Civil Engineering Department, will lead a team of researchers who will integrate data from advanced weather radar systems, innovative wireless sensors and crowdsourcing of data via cell phone applications to create high-resolution modeling of urban water systems.

In the air

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention, Phys.org reported. Yuze Sun, an assistant professor in electrical engineering, said the device is a nanoscale gas chromatography tool that separates vapors from a person's breath, a room or an area, then detects what harmful vapors are present.

Fatigue focus

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

UT Arlington engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts, Micro Manufacturing.com reported. Haiying Huang, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the new technology and process would be better and more efficient than taking X-rays of an aircraft's wing.  

New project looks at aircraft materials defects micro- and nanoscale levels

Friday, October 17, 2014

UT Arlington engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts, Nanowerk, Phys.org, PDD Net and (e) Science News reported. Haiying Huang, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the new technology and process would be better and more efficient than taking X-rays of an aircraft's wing. The team includes Stathis Meletis, professor and chair of the Materials Science and Engineering Department. They also received a $348,385 grant from the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to purchase two pieces of equipment that will help gauge the wear on these aircraft parts. 

Urban water sustainability

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Dong-Jun Seo, a UT Arlington environmental engineer, has been selected to participate in a $12.5 million National Science Foundation program aimed at creating a more sustainable society, the NSF website, TMCnet, Tech News and several other media websites reported. The multi-grant effort is funded through the Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering (CyberSEES) program.

Wearable interface to make prosthetics more comfortable

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Rehacare.com and News-line reported. Haiying Huang, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at UT Arlington's Research Institute, are collaborating on the project. The interface will resemble an inflatable bubble wrap that will be embedded with sensors.

NASA selects advanced oxygen recovery proposals for spacecraft missions

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, which includes UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, Aerospace Manufacturing and Design reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project is titled: Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis.

Configuring a good fit

Monday, October 13, 2014

UT Arlington researchers Haiying Huang and Muthu Wijesundara have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Orthotics and Prosthetics, Healio and The Edge reported.

Cooling electrons

Monday, October 13, 2014

A UT Arlington researcher has succeeded in cooling electrons without using external sources, Electronics Cooling reported. Using a nanoscale structure, electrons were passed through a quantum well, which keeps the electrons from heating up. This process allowed the electrons to be cooled to -228 degrees Celsius at room temperature. Because the electrons are cold, this results in lower energy consumption amongst electronic devices. Researchers speculate a 10 percent increase in battery life due to less energy consumption. Seong Jin Koh, associate professor of Materials Science & Engineering at UT Arlington, said usually an entire device has to be immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath for this to take place.

Partnering for game-changing technologies

Thursday, October 9, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, including UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, FIRE News, Parabolic Arc and many other websites reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project is titled "Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis." Professors from the UT Arlington College of Science and College of Engineering are collaborating on the project.

Changing directions

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

A UT Arlington team exploring how neuron growth can be controlled in the lab and, possibly, in the human body has published a new paper in Nature Scientific Reports on how fluid flow could play a significant role, Science360.com, the National Science Foundation's website, reported. AZoNANO,com and R&D Magazine also reported on the research. In a new study co-authored by Samarendra Mohanty, leader of the Biophysics and Physiology Lab in the College of Science, the researchers were able to use microfluidic stimulations to change the path of an axon at an angle of up to 90 degrees. Such knowledge could be essential for advances in understanding and treating spinal cord injuries.

Fueling space exploration

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, including UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, PR Newswire, The Street, Investor Biospace, Reuters and many other websites reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project, run by faculty from the Colleges of Engineering and Science, is titled "Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis."

A plan for health

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, Health Canal.com reported. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which will work for three years on the $374,998 NSF grant titled: "Statistics-based Optimization Methods for Adaptive Interdisciplinary Pain Management."

Test flight missions

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center is expanding operations, with test-flight missions this week from an airport in Port Mansfield on the Texas coast, General Aviation News, the Forney Post and many other media outlets reported. The UT Arlington Research Institute is a part of the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center team that received a Federal Aviation Association designation for testing the unmanned aircraft systems.

UTA research could lead to homeland security and medical advances

Monday, October 6, 2014

UT Arlington researchers say recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, Product, Design & Development, One News Page and NanoDaily reported. In a recently published paper, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by heating nanoparticles composed of lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen until a transparent ceramic is formed. A scintillator refers to a material that glows in response to radiation.

Major award for Coppell teacher, a UT Arlington alum

Monday, October 6, 2014

Mike Yakubovsky, a Coppell High School teacher, was one of six in the world to receive the 2014 National Instruments Excellence in Engineering Education Awards, the Coppell Gazette reported. Yakubovsky is a UT Arlington graduate.

Optimizing data for pain management

Thursday, October 2, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, PhysOrg reported. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which will work for three years on the $374,998 NSF grant titled: "Statistics-based Optimization Methods for Adaptive Interdisciplinary Pain Management."

Cooling electrons for energy efficiency

Thursday, October 2, 2014

A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington has developed a method to cool electrons to extremely low temperature without external power, a development that may enable electronic devices to work with extremely low power, according to Electronics360. The UT Arlington team – lead by Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor at the Material Science Department – discovered a process to lower the excitation of electrons by passing the particles through a quantum well.

New method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

A UT Arlington research team says recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, according to NSF Science 360, Engineering.com, R&D Magazine and Science Newsline. In a paper published in Optics Letters, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by heating nanoparticles composed of lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen until a transparent ceramic is formed. A scintillator refers to a material that glows in response to radiation.

Beaks of birds inspires creation of device to harvest water

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington drew inspiration from an unlikely source — the beaks of the plovers, stilts and other shore birds — when they developed a new type of fog-harvesting device that shows early promise in bringing water to the world’s deserts, according to Civil Engineering, the magazine of the American Society of Civil Engineers. The research was led by Cheng Luo, an engineering professor, and also involves Xin Heng, a doctoral candidate at the school. It was published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Materials & Interfaces.

September

A new way to protect

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

A UT Arlington team says recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, according to HealthCanal, The Tech Journal, Bio-Medicine and Nanotechnology Now. In a paper to be published in the Oct. 1 issue of Optics Letters, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe their new method. Chen is co-director of UT Arlington’s Security Advances Via Applied Nanotechnology, or SAVANT, Center. SAVANT co-director and Physics Professor Andrew Brandt is a co-author on the paper, as well as Alex Weiss, chair of the physics department, and Rasool Kenarangui, senior lecturer in the College of Engineering’s Department of Electrical Engineering.

Wearing your computer

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas have created technology that could be the first step toward wearable computers with self-contained power sources or, more immediately, a smartphone that doesn’t die after a few hours of heavy use, according to R&D News, EIN Newsdesk and Electric Component News. The research included contributions from UT Arlington scientists and taps into the power of a single electron to control energy consumption inside transistors. It was published online in Nature Communications.

Problem pipes

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Jean-Pierre Bardet, UT Arlington professor of engineering and director of the Urban Water Institute, was interviewed on CBS Radio KNXAM in Los Angeles about aging cast iron water pipes and a rash of recent water main breaks in the area. He said steps must be taken to make the system more resilient while balancing costs. “It’s expensive to replace so many miles of pipe and usually it’s a better strategy to prioritize the weakest link,” he said.

Innovation Nation

Monday, September 29, 2014

The CBS News series Innovation Nation featured UT Arlington’s Smitha Rao, a research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, electrical engineering professor, and their micro-windmill innovation. The team designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy that could be used for sensors and lights for roads and bridges, and may become a solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging. Host Mo Rocca called the UT Arlington work “the future of the windmill, sleek, high-tech and able to fit on a grain of rice.”

New director for UTARI

Monday, September 29, 2014

A McClatchy Tribune story focused on Mickey McCabe’s 21-year career at the University of Dayton and his recent announcement that he has taken a job as executive director of the UT Arlington Research Institute. University of Dayton President Daniel J. Curran credits McCabe with working to more than double sponsored research at the university over the course of his career. As vice president for research, McCabe implemented programs to encourage and support faculty research initiatives, he said.

Perturbation analysis

Monday, September 29, 2014

Chengkai Li, an associate professor in the UT Arlington computer science and engineering department, has been awarded a $241,778 National Science Foundation grant for his proposal about “perturbation analysis of database queries,” according to TMC.net. He is teaming with Duke University and Stanford University on the joint grant, which is worth more than $1.2 million. Perturbation analysis studies how tweaks of database query templates and parameters affect query results.

Huang wins NSF grant

Monday, September 29, 2014

A UT Arlington computer and data scientist has won a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a scalable data-mining framework that will help manufacturers quickly discover desired materials for building their products, according to the Genetics Times. Junzhou Huang, an assistant professor of Computer Science & Engineering with an expertise in big data and statistical learning, will design scalable algorithms and a computational framework that can search unprecedented volumes of data detailing the complete set of genes present in numerous materials.

Wearable computers

Monday, September 29, 2014

A study conducted at the University of Texas at Dallas, with collaboration from UT Arlington scientists, has created technology that could be the first step toward wearable computers with self-contained power sources or a smartphone that doesn't die after a few hours of heavy use, Hispanic Business, The Cutting Edge and eScienceNews. A study published in Nature Communication said the team has developed a new technology that could reduce energy consumption in mobile devices and computers.

Pipeline project

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

A WaterWorld story about the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure honoring a pipeline project by Tarrant Regional Water District mentioned the involvement of graduate students in civil engineering at UT Arlington. The students evaluated the use of native soils to produce native controlled low-strength material, or CLSM.

Harvesting water

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

UT Arlington Engineering Professor Cheng Luo and his doctoral student, Xin Heng, say their new highly efficient fog collector could help the most parched areas of Saudi Arabia to water-scarce areas of the western U.S., the website Environmental Research Web reported. The team came up with their design after noting how long-billed shorebirds with thin beaks get water. The research is featured in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interface.

National spotlight

Monday, September 22, 2014

A new CBS News series called Innovation Nation will feature UT Arlington’s Smitha Rao, a research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, electrical engineering professor. The team designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred. Their interview with the show is set to air at 10 a.m. Saturday.

Harvesting water

Monday, September 22, 2014

A simple device, invented by UT Arlington researchers and inspired by the beaks of shorebirds, can harvest drops of water from fog and dew, according to Inland News Today and Faithful News. Its developers say it could help drought-prone communities around the world meet their need for drinkable water. Engineering professor Cheng Luo and his doctoral student Xin Heng published their research in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Harvest of water

Thursday, September 18, 2014

A simple device, inspired by the beaks of shorebirds, can harvest drops of water from fog and dew. Its developers say it could help drought-stricken areas around the world or deserts meet their need for drinkable water. University of Texas at Arlington engineering professor Cheng Luo and his doctoral student Xin Heng came up with their design after noting how long-billed shorebirds with thin beaks get water, the Kansas City Post, Cambodian Times, Voice of America online, PortalMundos.com, DailyMe.com, Science Codex and Bio-Medicine reported.

Cool device

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Scientists in Texas have found a method of cooling electrons to nearly absolute zero, and they’ve done it at room temperature, Oil Price.com, Wireless Design & Development magazine, Electronic Products.com, Space Daily.com and Communications of the ACM.org reported. Their discovery could lead to electronic devices that need only about one-tenth as much energy as they do today, thereby dramatically reducing the size and weight of batteries. “We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Texas at Arlington. “Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath.”

On the way up

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi now has an airport and runway in its approved flight ranges, Focus Daily News reported. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range to test and fly unmanned aircraft that includes the Port Mansfield airport. The center, along with the UT Arlington Research Institute, is among six federally designated test sites for unmanned aircraft systems.  

National honors

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will present its President's Awards of Excellence during HACU's 28th Annual Conference Oct. 4-6 in Denver, Colo., Virtual-Strategy.com, Financial Buzz.com and Morningstar.com reported. The 2014 honorees include The University of Texas at Arlington, which earned Outstanding HACU-Member Institution in recognition of excellence in support of HACU’s mission.

Enrollment record

Monday, September 15, 2014

Fall enrollment has reached a new record high at UT Arlington, a Fort Worth Star-Telegram editorial said. Nearly 35,000 students are calling themselves Mavericks this autumn, up 4.8 percent from the previous year. The most notable gains this year were in the engineering college, where more than 6,000 students are now enrolled – a 25 percent increase over fall 2013.

Global MOOCs

Monday, September 15, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington joins the few institutions in the country to participate in a program that gives promising high school students a better chance at excelling in college by offering them introductory-level courses online, for free, IBL Studios Education reported. TheedX initiative is an international movement that aims to make Massive Open Online Courses accessible to millions of eager students all over the globe by partnering with other academic institutions.

Saving energy through cooling

Monday, September 15, 2014

A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy, Controlled Environments magazine and Extreme Tech.com reported. The process involves passing electrons through a quantum well to cool them and keep them from heating. "We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature. Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the UT Arlington Materials Science & Engineering Department, who led the research.

New runway

Monday, September 15, 2014

The Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi now has an airport and runway in its approved flight ranges, AviationPros.com reported. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range to test and fly unmanned aircraft that includes the Port Mansfield airport. The center, along with the UT Arlington Research Institute, is among six federally designated test sites for unmanned aircraft systems.  

Coal research

Friday, September 12, 2014

UT Arlington is among six universities with coal research projects that the U.S. Department of Energy has selected to help seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of coal resources, IM-Mining.com reported.

Cooling electrons

Friday, September 12, 2014

A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy, ECNmag.com, Nanotechnology Now, PDDnet.com, New Energy and Fuel.com and Wireless Designmag.com reported. The process involves passing electrons through a quantum well to cool them and keep them from heating. "We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature. Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the UT Arlington Materials Science & Engineering Department, who led the research.

New runway

Friday, September 12, 2014

The Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi now has an airport and runway in its approved flight ranges, the Forney Post reported. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range to test and fly unmanned aircraft that includes the Port Mansfield airport. The center, along with the UT Arlington Research Institute, is among six federally designated test sites for unmanned aircraft systems.  

Reaching new heights

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Fall enrollment at The University of Texas at Arlington continues to set records, as enrollment has hit a new high of nearly 35,000, the Dallas Business Journal, Fort Worth Business Press, WBAP/820 AM, KLIF/550 AM and CultureMap Dallas reported. Engineering, education and nursing programs are fueling most of that growth. “We’ve been focusing on areas where there’s a workforce need. And, we’ve really been meeting those workforce needs. Students who come here know they’re going to get jobs,” UT Arlington President Vistasp Karbhari said in an interview with KXAS/NBC 5.

Keeping it cool

Thursday, September 11, 2014

A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy, the National Science Foundation, Science360.gov, eScience News and Opli.net reported. The process involves passing electrons through a quantum well to cool them and keep them from heating. "We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature. Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the UT Arlington Materials Science & Engineering Department, who led the research. Nanowerk.com, Hispanic Business.com, Science Newsline, Science Codex, Science Daily and R&Dmag.com also reported on the new research.

Cleaner coal

Thursday, September 11, 2014

UT Arlington is among six universities with coal research projects that the U.S. Department of Energy has selected to help seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of coal resources, Hispanic Business.com reported. A nearly $400,000 award over the next three years will help UT Arlington to develop low-cost distributed condition monitoring of coal-fired boilers through materials development, sensor design, and wireless flexible antennae sensor arrays. The sensors will be designed to detect soot accumulation and to monitor temperature and strain of steam pipes. 

Advancing heart health

Thursday, September 11, 2014

In a story about a million-dollar pilot study to assess new regimens for peripheral vascular disease, BioNews-TX.com reported that a member of the faculty at UT Arlington has partnered with the American Heart Association in the development of a breakthrough method in nanomedicine, which involves stimulating analogous stem cells to form stents in patients’ blood vessels. Kytai Nguyen, a bioengineering associate professor at UT Arlington, received the grant last year to fund her research. The new study involves the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio.

Enrollment record

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

KRLD/1080 AM interviewed UT Arlington President Vistasp Karbhari about enrollment at the University, which has hit a record high of nearly 35,000 students. That’s up 65 percent since 2001. The growth is driven largely by engineering, which has 6,000 students – a 25 percent jump compared to this time last year. “Most of this has really been fueled by workforce needs that we have in the North Texas area and across the nation,” Karbhari said. “Our College of Engineering, across all departments, has been able to move very quickly to meet those needs.” Enrollment in the business, education and nursing programs is up, too.

Coal research

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

UT Arlington is among six universities with coal research projects that the U.S. Department of Energy has selected to help seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of coal resources, Energy Central and Energy Industry Today reported. A nearly $400,000 award over the next three years will help UT Arlington to develop low-cost distributed condition monitoring of coal-fired boilers through materials development, sensor design, and wireless flexible antennae sensor arrays. The sensors will be designed to detect soot accumulation and to monitor temperature and strain of steam pipes. 

College rankings

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Despite falling a spot in this year’s U.S. News & World Reportcollege rankings, Rice University remained the only Texas university to crack the top 20, the Texas Tribune reported. UT Arlington continues to rank fifth among national universities for undergraduate diversity, according to the report. UT Arlington ranked No. 100 among the nation’s best undergraduate engineering programs and in the top 140 of undergraduate business programs.

Better materials through genome network

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

A UT Arlington computer and data scientist has won a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a scalable data-mining framework that will help manufacturers quickly discover desired materials for building their products, ECN Mag.com, Congoo News, Hispanic Business.com, Nanowerk.com, Bio-Medicine, TMCnet.com and PDDNet.com reported. Junzhou Huang, an assistant professor of Computer Science & Engineering with an expertise in big data and statistical learning, will design scalable algorithms and a computational framework that can search unprecedented volumes of data detailing the complete set of genes present in numerous materials. The innovation may aid manufacturers in building better, longer-lasting cell phones, satellites or aircraft parts, Huang said.

Offshore wind energy

Monday, September 8, 2014

The Dallas Morning News quoted Wei-Jen Lee, a UT Arlington professor of electrical engineering, in an article about the development of offshore wind power in the U.S. “Eventually offshore wind will be part of the picture. In the long run, the renewable energy price is going to come down and fossil fuels are going to go up. They’re going to coexist,” Lee said in an interview last year. “The bottom line is it comes down to the price of electricity, and right now electricity is cheap.” According to a new study, the federal government needs to reduce bureaucratic red tape and enact greater regulation if wind power is going to develop in the U.S. The article also appeared on the National Wind Watch website, wind-watch.org.

Keeping your information safe from online hackers

Friday, September 5, 2014

Matthew Wright, a UT Arlington associate professor of computer science and engineering, said deciding on unusual passwords or opting for a password manager are options for computer security in cloud computing, WFAA Channel 8 reported in a story about the recent hacking incident in which several Hollywood stars' private photos were pilfered.

Freshmen to get research experience

Thursday, September 4, 2014

UT Arlington is launching the ASSURE program this fall, BioNews Texas reported. ASSURE is Achieving Success through Undergraduate Research and Engagement, a program aimed at getting freshmen involved in research.

UT Arlington Research Institute gets new leader

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Mickey McCabe, vice president for research at the University of Dayton in Ohio and executive director of the University of Dayton Research Institute, has been appointed executive director of University of Texas at Arlington’s Research Institute in Fort Worth, the Fort Worth Business Press, the Dallas Business Journal, the Chicago Business Journal, WSMV 4 in Nashville, Tenn., WFLX Fox 29 in West Palm Beach, Fla., KFMB CBS 8 in San Diego and many other websites reported.

Industry partner

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Walmart is using its size and buying power to fuel a “Made in the U.S.A.” movement that can generate jobs for Americans and spark an economic revival in local communities, Mass Market Retailers reported. Part of that effort was awarding several grants to research universities last month. UT Arlington received a Walmart grant to develop a novel manufacturing system that will autonomously prepare small motor subsystems and assemble the motor components.

Micro-windmill power

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

A UT Arlington research associate and electrical engineering professor have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, Encore reported. Smitha Rao, the research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, the electrical engineering professor, have designed the system.

UTA teams with APD to research UAVs

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

UT Arlington and the Arlington Police Department are working together to research unmanned aerial vehicles for use in the public during search and rescue missions, NBC 5 KXAS reported. UT Arlington also has started a UAV certification program for students.

Big possibilities of tiny windmills

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

A team of researchers from UT Arlington announced recently that they had developed a prototype of a wind turbine that might deliver electricity in tiny bursts to devices like smartphones, the Star Tribune and the News of the Weird reported. The windmills are less than half the size of a grain of rice.

August

Friday, August 29, 2014

A UT Arlington research associate and electrical engineering professor have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, the Anchorage Press reported. Smitha Rao, the research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, the electrical engineering professor, designed the system.

A grant for innovation

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

UT Arlington has received a $229,214 grant from the Walmart Foundation to build a robotic small motors assembly and testing system that would cut the manufacturing costs of goods, allowing those goods to be produced in the United States that were formerly built overseas, Today’s Medical Developments reported. The Walmart U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Grant was part of an announcement of $4 million in awards to seven research and development institutions at the 2014 U.S. Manufacturing Summit in Denver made possible through the collaboration between Walmart, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the Walmart Foundation.

Tiny windmills for power

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

A UT Arlington research associate and electrical engineering professor have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, Solar Feeds, Encore and the Fort Myers (Fla.) Weekly reported. Smitha Rao, the research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, the electrical engineering professor, have designed the system.

Protecting health and the environment

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Melanie Sattler, a UT Arlington environmental associate professor in the Civil Engineering Department, was interviewed in a KXAS NBC 5 story about old buses being used in Plano school district. She said the old buses could lead to more pollution and health risks. Nearly half of Plano school district's buses were built before 2007, the year in which clean air agencies say engine and pollution improvements were made to the buses.

Structural engineer quoted

Friday, August 22, 2014

A Dallas Morning News Neighbors Go update on problems with the $60 million Allen ISD football stadium featured Shih-Ho “Simon” Chao, an associate professor of engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington. He discussed FRP, a material used to strengthen surfaces. “If you pull it, it’s very hard to break it,” Chao said.

Walmart manufacturing grant

Thursday, August 21, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington has received a $229,214 grant from the Walmart Foundation to build a robotic small motors assembly and testing system that would cut manufacturing costs, allowing some goods built overseas to be produced in the U.S, Dallas Morning News columnist Robert Miller reported. UT Arlington was one of seven research and development institutions that received $4 million in awards, the first grant recipients of the Walmart U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund. Aditya Das, a senior research scientist at the UT Arlington Research Institute, will lead the project. 

Rogers named IIE Fellow

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

UT Arlington Professor Jamie Rogers was named a fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers at the IIE annual conference, according to the Dallas Business Journal’s People on the Move feature. The award recognizes people who have made significant, nationally recognized contributions to industrial engineering. It is the highest classification of IEEE membership.

Computer network aids in mental illness detection

Monday, August 18, 2014

Jean Gao, a UT Arlington associate professor of computer science and engineering, and Dong-Chul Kim, who recently earned his doctorate in computer science and engineering, are using a genetic computer network inference model that eventually could predict whether a person will suffer from bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or another mental illness, according to the website RedOrbit. Their work was published in the June edition of Biomed Research International.

Small motors manufacturing help

Monday, August 18, 2014

UT Arlington has received a $229,214 grant from the Walmart Foundation to build a robotic small motors assembly and testing system that would cut the manufacturing costs of goods, allowing those goods to be produced in the United States that were formerly built overseas, according to the website Bio-Medicine. The Walmart U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Grant was part of an announcement of $4 million in awards to seven research and development institutions at the 2014 U.S. Manufacturing Summit in Denver made possible through the collaboration between Walmart, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the Walmart Foundation. 

Innovation Fund grant

Friday, August 15, 2014

Seven leading research and development institutions – including UT Arlington - were awarded a total of $4 million in grants this week by the Walmart U.S. Manufacturing Innovation Fund for projects focused on new processes, ideas and job creation that will foster America's growing manufacturing footprint, Reuters, The Street,  Financial Buzz, MSN Money, the Fort Worth Business Press and several other websites reported. The Innovation Fund is a project of Walmart, the Walmart Foundation and the U.S. Conference of Mayors (USCM). With its $229,214 award, UT Arlington will develop a novel manufacturing system that will autonomously prepare small motor sub-systems and assemble the motor components. Aditya Das, senior research scientist at the UT Arlington Research Institute, will lead for the project. 

Mental illness early detection

Friday, August 15, 2014

A novel genetic computer network inference model developed at UT Arlington could someday help clinicians predict if someone will develop mental illness, the website Bio-News Texas reported. The new technology is the result of a project led by Jean Gao, a computer science and engineering associate researcher at UT Arlington, and Dong-Chul Kim, Gao’s former doctoral graduate student, who recently earned his doctorate in computer science and engineering from UT Arlington.

Mental illness detection

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Jean Gao, a UT Arlington associate professor of computer science and engineering, and Dong-Chul Kim, who recently earned his doctorate in computer science and engineering, are using a genetic computer network inference model that eventually could predict whether a person will suffer from bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or another mental illness, according to the websites HealthCanal, MedicalXpress, and Supercomputing Online. The findings are detailed in the paper “Inference of SNP-Gene Regulatory Networks by Integrating Gene Expressions and Genetic Perturbations,” which was published in the June edition of Biomed Research International.

Scholarship winner

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Eduardo Aguirre, an electrical engineering student at UT Arlington, was the winner of one of 16 $5,000 scholarships from the American Honda and the Hispanic Scholarship Fund, according to the website The News Wheel. The 16 Latino undergraduate students were selected for their exemplary academic performance, interest in pursuing a career in science and engineering, and a working knowledge of the automotive industry. 

Arsenic analyzer

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

A Dallas Morning News story on commercialization of research at universities in North Texas focused on UT Arlington and National Science Foundation funding for the development of an arsenic analyzer by Purnendu Dasgupta, Jenkins Garrett Professor of Chemistry, and Aditya Das, senior research scientist at the UT Arlington Research Institute. The story also noted that UT Arlington has partnered with startup incubator Tech Fort Worth to enhance its efforts. 

Monday, August 11, 2014

Bill Hale, the Texas Department of Transportation’s Dallas district engineer and a UT Arlington graduate, has been named the state transportation agency’s director of engineer operations for metro districts, according to The Dallas Morning News. Hale will oversee transportation planning in all of the state’s big cities. He holds a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in civil engineering from UT Arlington.

ASEE carries STEM Academy article

Monday, August 11, 2014

A Fort Worth Star-Telegram article about the partnership between UT Arlington and the Arlington school district to create a STEM academy made it to the American Society for Engineering Education’s First Bell digest.

Friday, August 8, 2014

UT Arlington’s College of Engineering and the College of Science have formed a new partnership with the Arlington Independent School District to form a free, dual-credit academy for high school students who want to study science, technology, engineering and math, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. One hundred 7th and 8th grade students will be recruited in January for the STEM Academy that will open at Martin High School in August 2015. The program eventually will include 400 students across grades 9 through 12.

Danger detection

Monday, August 4, 2014

Hyeok Choi, a UT Arlington assistant professor of environmental engineering, is working on creating a sensor that can detect toxins at very low levels in freshwater bodies of water, Environmental Health Perspectives, a National Institutes of Health magazine, reported. Choi received a grant to detect harmful algae blooms. The article outlined several projects trying to cope with the harmful algae blooms.

Windmills of tomorrow

Monday, August 4, 2014

Commercial wind turbines stand more than a hundred feet tall, with blades nearly as long, Texas Public Radio reported in republishing a KERA Breakthrough series. The wind turbines developed by engineers at UT Arlington are a bit smaller. As part of the series, Lauren Silverman reports on micro windmills, which are tinier than an ant.

Bursting pipes

Friday, August 1, 2014

Los Angeles radio stations KABC 790 (ABC) and KNX 1170 (CBS) interviewed Jean-Pierre Bardet, director of the Urban Water Institute and professor of civil engineering at UT Arlington, about the major water main break that flooded parts of the UCLA campus. Bardet said much of Los Angeles’ infrastructure is aging and the breaks are likely to continue in the future. Bardet worked with officials on a replacement plan of aging infrastructure several years ago as a consultant with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power.

Research in concrete fiber

Friday, August 1, 2014

Rick Traylor, the new chairman of the American Concrete Pipe Association, mentioned UT Arlington in an interview with Concrete Products.com. More available funds in the last year or two has translated into more investment in research, particularly work done with The University of Texas at Arlington, which is close to ACPA’s national headquarters in Dallas. “We’re looking at the long-term strength of fiber-reinforced pipe, examining various diameters and fiber content in terms of pounds of fiber/cu. yd., and evaluating the performance mechanisms that occur in fiber-reinforced pipe,” Traylor explained.

RoboBoat competition

Friday, August 1, 2014

UT Arlington was one of just 13 schools invited to compete in the 7th annual International RoboBoat Competition held last month in Virginia Beach, Va, PDDNet.com reported. The Office of Naval Research and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Foundation sponsored the competition, which organizers called ideal preparation for engineering students entering the workforce. Teams from as far away as Indonesia competed in the autonomous robotics challenge. 

July

A problem foundation

Thursday, July 31, 2014

KXAS/NBC 5 included a previously recorded interview with Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, for its consumer investigation follow-up report into one homeowner’s 3-year fight with a major homebuilder. “Everything suggests they have a problem,” Hossain initially said of foundation cracks in the home he reviewed. The homebuilder recently enlisted a residential warranty company to examine the claims. They agreed there are issues and repairs will be made.

Big idea for tiny technology

Thursday, July 31, 2014

KERA/90.1 FM (NPR) and the KERA.org Breakthroughs blog featured research on micro-windmills that could harvest enough energy to recharge cell phones. The researchers, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao, and research assistant Smitha Rao, have created the micro-windmills, which are just half the size of an ant. The piece also aired on StateImpact, a reporting project of National Public Radio member stations.

A valuable contribution

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The Burleson Star published a letter to the editor about scholarships, success and philanthropy that was written by Dylan Spurrier, a UT Arlington engineering student. The undergraduate recently received a scholarship from Burleson-based Bennett Building Systems. “Though there is no direct nominal return on local philanthropy, your contribution to your community will grease the machine that drives us forward,” Spurrier wrote, adding that he is working to establish a scholarship fund in UT Arlington’s College of Engineering. 

Tiny windmill, big idea

Monday, July 28, 2014

J.-C. Chiao, Jenkins Garrett Professor of Electrical Engineering at UT Arlington, appeared on Al Jazeera America’s “Real Money with Ali Velshi” to discuss his research of tiny windmills that can harness wind to power items like cell phones. “We believe in the future that we can either use this device to power up small devices or we can use an array of them to generate enough power to power industries directly,” Chiao said.

Engineering professors awarded $610k grant by NSF ABI

Thursday, July 24, 2014

UT Arlington computer science and engineering professors Heng Huang and Chris Ding have been awarded a $610,392 grant by the NSF ABI (Advances in Biological Informatics) program to fund a three-year project focused on designing an interactive database of gene expressions of the fruit fly, the websites BioNews Texas and PhysOrg reported. The project is expected to yield methods of analyzing data that will aid in biomedical science and engineering, systems biology, clinical pathology, oncology and pharmaceuticals.

Improving lives with robots

Thursday, July 17, 2014

WOAI News 4 in San Antonio reported that Michael Crawford, a 23-year-old Army specialist, discovered Wednesday that he is getting a brand new, free smart home from HEB grocery store. Robotics specialists at UT Arlington are helping with the design of the smart home.

Revved up learning

Monday, July 14, 2014

NBC 5/KXAS and CBS 11/KTVT reported on UT Arlington's formula racing program, which is ranked No. 1 in the country and No. 5 in the world. The team hosted its 14th annual Texas Autocross Weekend Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Schools from across North America attended.

UAVs and the FAA

Monday, July 14, 2014

Brian Huff, an associate professor of engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington, said the FAA’s criteria on recent rules should be based on whether hobbyists are keeping unmanned aerial vehicles safe, the Houston Chronicle, the Pendleton (Ind.) Times-Post, seattlepi.com, the Washington Times, McClatchey DC and several other media outlets reported. The story first appeared in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Tiny windmills for the future

Monday, July 14, 2014

Micro-windmills could supply one of the answers to mobile energy in the future, Ever Widening Circles reported. The article mentioned the work of UT Arlington electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao and research assistant Smitha Rao, who have created the micro-windmills, which are 1.8 millimeters wide at their widest point.

New FAA rules

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Brian Huff, an associate professor of engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington, was featured in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram story about the FAA’s recent efforts to clarify its rules for flying model aircraft. “To me the criteria should be if it is being operated in a safe and appropriate manner rather than if it is being used for sport and recreation,” Huff said. The story also appeared in other McClatchy newspapers such as the Modesto Bee

Stadium cracks

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

KTVT/CBS 11 interviewed Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, about allegations that Allen ISD knew about cracks in its $60 million stadium but waited to fill them. Chao said not filling the cracks could lead to water leaking in and causing structural damage.

Fine-tuning ahead of a racing weekend at UT Arlington

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington student Formula SAE racing team has fine-tuned its Active Aero technology for the 14th Annual Texas Autocross Weekend July 11-14 on the UT Arlington campus, the website HispanicBusiness.com reported. Student engineers have incorporated four on-board computers instead of the single computer used in 2013 to enable the car to respond more quickly and easily than before.

Hazard mitigation

Monday, July 7, 2014

A three-year, $250,000 National Science Foundation grant will match six undergraduate students with a Spanish technical institute so they can learn how to prepare civil infrastructure for natural, manmade and accidental disasters and how to recover quickly from such events, according to PhysOrg. The grant will allow UT Arlington to collaborate with AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Valencia, Spain, on projects aligned with the multi-disciplinary Disaster Mitigation Group at UT Arlington, which Civil Engineering Professor Nur Yazdani leads.

New rules could shape city landfill

Monday, July 7, 2014

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are helping to increase the power-generating capacity of gas capture efforts at the Denton landfill by studying how to add water to the pile to better control decomposition and the production of gas, according to the Denton Record-Chronicle. New landfills will be required to capture two-thirds of their methane and landfill gas by 2023, about 13 percent more than is required under current rules.

UT Arlington students excel at robotics conference in Hong Kong

Monday, July 7, 2014

Two UT Arlington student engineering teams took home first-place honors at a flagship academic conference for robotics in Hong Kong, the 2014 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The team, composed of doctoral student Isura Ranatunga and master’s students Sandesh Gowda and Shweta Hardas, won $1,000 for disarming “land mines” in Portugal in a simulation environment.

Chief appointment for alum

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Leidos Holdings, Inc. appointed Roger Krone as chief executive officer, Investor Point, PRNewswire, Reuters and a host of other media outlets reported. Krone is currently president of Network and Space Systems for The Boeing Company. Krone earned a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology, a master's degree in aerospace engineering from The University of Texas at Arlington and a master of business administration from Harvard Graduate School of Business. Leidos is a 22,000-employee science and technology solutions company.

Detecting bladder cancer

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The National Science Foundation has presented a team of researchers with a $480,000 grant to build a device that uses nanotechnology, combined with a urine test to detect tiny amounts of bladder cancer cells, In Compliance Magazine and Tau Beta Pi's HQ Blog reported. Samir Iqbal, a UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, is the principal investigator on the project. The device would allow for much earlier detection of bladder cancer.

Photonics technologies

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The IEEE Photonics Society's Summer Topicals Meeting series covers emerging topics in photonics science, technology and applications, Laser Focus World reported. "The 2014 Summer Topicals Meeting Series spans a broad range of five emerging photonics technologies and research areas," says conference general chair Weidong Zhou of the Nanophotonics Lab at UT Arlington. "These topics include novel materials and devices, integrated photonics, and systems related to the conference theme of Functional Material Integration & Optical Systems."

June

City branding video includes UTA

Monday, June 30, 2014

UT Arlington is featured in a new branding video for the city of Arlington called “The American Dream City,” The Dallas Morning News reported. Electrical Engineering Professor J.-C. Chiao and Research Associate Smitha Rao are featured in the video.

Test flying can begin at South Texas site

Friday, June 27, 2014

KRWG.org posted video of Federal Aviation Administration-approved drone testing that began this week in south Texas through Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence & Innovation. LSUASC is a consortium of 16 research institutions and private-sector service companies including the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute.  

Laser technology used for drug delivery

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

UT Arlington physics researchers may have developed a way to use laser technology to deliver drug and gene therapy at the cellular level without damaging surrounding tissue, Nanotechnology Now, News Medical.net, Bio-Medicine, Health Canal, Nanowerk.com, e! Science News and other media outlets reported. The method eventually could help patients suffering from genetic conditions, cancers and neurological diseases.  

NSF funds cancer detection research

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

A multi-institutional research team has received a $480,000 National Science Foundation grant to build an inexpensive device that uses nanotechnology and a simple urine test to detect the most miniscule amount of bladder cancer cells in a patient, Medical Design Technology, Phys.org and Nanowerk.com reported.    

FAA approves South Texas testing site

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

The Federal Aviation Administration has given formal approval for an unmanned aircraft testing site near Corpus Christi, the Dallas Business Journal and other media reported. Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence & Innovation has met all federal requirements to begin full operations as a test site, becoming one of only six across the nation. LSUASC is a consortium of 16 research institutions and private-sector service companies including The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute.

City branding video features University

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

The City of Arlington and the Arlington Convention & Visitors Bureau announced the City’s new official brand “Arlington: The American Dream City,” MyArlingtonTX.com reported. Officially launching today, the brand marks the first time that the City and the CVB have aligned in developing an identity for Arlington. A promotional video on the site prominently features images of the UT Arlington campus and interviews with UT Arlington electrical engineers J.-C. Chiao and Smitha Rao. Fort Worth Star-Telegram columnist Bud Kennedy noted that the video highlights the spiraling growth of UT Arlington.

NSF grant funds UTA researcher's bladder cancer detection device

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

A multi-institutional research team has received a $480,000 National Science Foundation grant to build an inexpensive device that uses nanotechnology and a simple urine test to detect the most miniscule amount of bladder cancer cells in a patient, Hispanic Business.com reported. UT Arlington’s Samir Iqbal, an electrical engineering associate professor, has teamed with Young-tae Kim, an associate professor in bioengineering; and Yair Lotan, who is a chaired professor in urology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, to publish their findings in an upcoming issue of Analytical Methods.  

Tiny windmill holds huge possibilities

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

SCPR.org, the website for 89.3 KPCC Southern California Public Radio, reported research out of UT Arlington that could mean powering cell phones with tiny windmills. When tested, the durable, nickel-based windmills withstood strong artificial winds and generated power. The hope is that these petite powerhouses may someday charge portable electronics. The technology is still in the early stage, but a Taiwanese company is already exploring how to get the micro-windmills to market.

Portable brain-mapping device allows researchers to ‘see’ where memory fails student veterans

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Medical Design Technology and BioOptics World reported on a study by UT Arlington Bioengineering Professor Hanli Liu, Associate Professor Social Work Alexa Smith-Osborne, and two other collaborators. The researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks.

Device aids student veterans who have PTSD

Monday, June 23, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks, Photonics.com, Science Daily and PsychCentral.com reported. The study by bioengineering professor Hanli Liu and Alexa Smith-Osborne, an associate professor of social work, and two other collaborators was published in the May 2014 edition of NeuroImage: Clinical

Unmanned systems center now operational

Monday, June 23, 2014

General Aviation News.com and KRWG.org reported that Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center will conduct a series of flight missions this week with the university’s RS-16 unmanned aerial vehicle. This follows an announcement from the Federal Aviation Administration that the Texas UAS research site is the fourth of six to become operational. Research institutions involved include Texas A&M University, Southwest Research Institute, The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute, Texas Tech University and the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Local robotics team competes in Hong Kong

Monday, June 23, 2014

The Asian American Press noted that a team from UT Arlington competed in the mobility event of the 2014 Mobile Microrobotics Challenge, held in Hong Kong from May 31 to June 2, as part of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Other teams that attended this year’s event were from Canada, France, Switzerland and Korea.

Civil engineer believes some Allen Stadium cracks could be fixed

Friday, June 20, 2014

KDFW/Fox 4 interviewed Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, about a new engineering report that says there are more problems than just cracks in Allen ISD’s $60 million stadium. School administrators issued the report Thursday. Chao believes the smaller cracks can be sealed but the larger ones may have to be torn out and then rebuilt. The district said repairs will be made and it hopes to reopen the stadium in time for graduation next May.

Looking to help student veterans

Friday, June 20, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks, Vancouverdesi.com, BioNews Texas, PDDNet.com, Knoxville Times (Tenn.) and Bioscience Technology reported. The study by bioengineering professor Hanli Liu and Alexa Smith-Osborne, an associate professor of social work, and two other collaborators was published in the May 2014 edition of NeuroImage: Clinical

Wind energy could be harnessed to charge cell phone

Thursday, June 19, 2014

In the world of tomorrow, charging your cell phone could be a breeze, National Geographic reported. Last year electrical engineers J-C Chiao and Smitha Rao, and their University of Texas at Arlington team, developed a prototype of a wind turbine—half the size of a grain of rice—that could be integrated into future electronics.

Research aim to help veterans with PTSD

Thursday, June 19, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks, Science Codex, Health Canal, Medical Xpress.com, News Medical.net and ECN Magazine reported. The study by bioengineering professor Hanli Liu and Alexa Smith-Osborne, an associate professor of social work, and two other collaborators was published in the May 2014 edition of NeuroImage: Clinical

Developing countries at risk for exposure to arsenic

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The National Science Foundation news reported that NSF funding will help two University of Texas at Arlington faculty members work with a Texas company to market a more environmentally friendly field analyzer for arsenic in water. Millions worldwide, especially in developing countries, are at risk for chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water.

Professor says small cracks in Allen Stadium could pose future problems

Thursday, June 19, 2014

KTVT/CBS 11 interviewed Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, about cracks in Allen ISD’s $60 million stadium that went unnoticed following early safety inspections. “One possibility is usually the cracks are very small. You cannot see even from this distance,” Chao said. He believes the cracks have been growing since that first football scrimmage and could start to impact other parts of the stadium. The district is set to release a new report Thursday that is said to contain “shortcomings in the engineering and possibly construction of the stadium.” 

Drone trouble

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Brian Huff, a UT Arlington associate professor of Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering, said a hobbyist who flew his unmanned aerial vehicle over AT&T Stadium, Six Flags Over Texas and Reunion Arena shouldn’t have been flying that high, over highways or over populated areas, KHOU reported based on a WFAA Channel 8 piece. Huff conducts research on UAVs, teaches courses in UAVs and sponsors the student UAV team.

Drone goes down

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Brian Huff, a UT Arlington associate professor of Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering, said a hobbyist who flew his unmanned aerial vehicle over AT&T Stadium, Six Flags Over Texas and Reunion Arena shouldn’t have been flying that high, over highways or over populated areas, WFAA Channel 8 reported. Huff conducts research on UAVs, teaches courses in UAVs and sponsors the student UAV team.

Winning team

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

A multi-disciplinary team of UT Arlington engineering, UT Southwestern Medical Center and UT Dallas management students won first place and the Participants’ Choice Award at this year’s International Emory Global Health Case Competition, BioNews Texas reported. The winning proposal suggests reforming the World Health Organization donor processes and expanding that agency's executive board to include non-governmental organizations, national public health institutes and faith-based organizations.

Guiding lights

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

The June issue of Optics & Photonics News featured work by Samar Mohanty, assistant professor of physics at UT Arlington. Mohanty and graduate student Bryan Black have discovered a way to use low-power, near-IR lasers to guide axons, the long fiber that carries connections for each neuron.

Tiny windmill power

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Researchers at UT Arlington have designed a miniscule windmill with a micro-generator that can be used to recharge mobile devices, CIO reported. Smitha Rao, a university research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor, designed the micro-windmills. The two have filed for a patent for the devices, which are about 1.8 mm at their widest point.

Monday, June 2, 2014

Personal unmanned aerial vehicles have been grounded by the FAA while the agency plays catch up to technology, KVUE 24 in Austin reported in carrying a WFAA story. Brian Huff, an associate professor in the Industrial Manufacturing & Systems Engineering Department in UT Arlington's College of Engineering, said he believes the FAA is being prudent and safe. Just this year, UT Arlington was granted a Certificate of Authorization from the FAA, which allows the University to fly UAVs at the UT Arlington Research Institute.

May

Friday, May 30, 2014

UT Arlington has hired Paul Componation to chair the Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Department, the Dallas Business Journal’s People on the Move page said. Most of Componation’s current work has been in improving launch system development for NASA.

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Brian Huff, associate professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering at UT Arlington, was featured in a WFAA/ABC 8 report on a Texas man who is at odds with the FAA over his desire to use unmanned aerial vehicles as a volunteer in emergency search and rescue situations. “The sooner that we can establish a set of rules … the faster that this nation will be able to join the rest of the world in successfully deploying unmanned aerial systems,” Huff said.

Structural engineer speaks to Allen stadium report

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

A KDFW/FOX4 report on problems with the Allen High School Eagle Stadium featured a look inside the Civil Engineering Laboratory at UT Arlington and an interview with Simon Chao, an associate professor of structural engineering and applied mechanics. Chao said he was troubled by reports of problems with load-bearing walls. “If that’s the case, that’d be a big problem,” Chao said.

Underneath the cracks

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Simon Chao, UT Arlington College of Engineering associate professor, was featured in a WFAA/ABC 8 story about cracks in the concourse of the Allen High School Eagle Stadium and plans to close the $60 million facility during the coming football season. The report said “stirrups” designed to prevent diagonal cracks were too far apart, violating building codes. Choa told News 8 that engineers prefer to keep the space between stirrups small.

Preventing falls

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

KERA/90.1FM, the Dallas NPR affiliate, aired the third installment in its Broken Hip series, which featured ongoing work at the UT Arlington Center for Healthy Living and Longevity by Christopher Ray, associate professor of kinesiology. Ray said studies show that improving balance can prevents falls in the elderly population and intervention for seniors who have already fallen is key. “The greatest predictor of a future fall is a previous fall,” Ray said. The report is also featured on the station website.

Filling a demand

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

UT Arlington is poised to offer a new master of construction management degree in the fall to help meet industry demands, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The 30-credit-hour-degree will be geared toward students who already have undergraduate degrees in fields including civil engineering, science and mathematics, architecture, engineering technology, construction management and business.

Sensing technology and applications

Monday, May 19, 2014

Jeongsik Shin, a senior research scientist at the UT Arlington Research Institute, was one of the featured speakers at a recent symposium on Sensing Technology and Applications, according to Virtual-Strategy Magazine and several other outlets. Shin outlined early results on research into electrohydrodynamic ink-jet printing in sensor fabrication for flexible robotic skins.

Construction management grads needed

Friday, May 16, 2014

The Fort Worth Business Press reported on the new master of construction management degree that the UT Arlington College of Engineering will begin offering in the fall. The new program will be the only one of its kind locally and will help fill the demand for construction project managers in the booming North Texas area. “The UT Arlington College of Engineering is expanding rapidly, and our faculty and students are rising to meet the needs of our region’s dynamic economy,” said Khosrow Behbehani, dean of the College of Engineering.

UTA collaborator honored

Friday, May 16, 2014

E3 Water LLC, a company that is working with UT Arlington and helping to increase the quality and availability of water, was among three firms honored at the TECH Fort Worth IMPACT Awards program Wednesday, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. The awards honor companies that bring innovative technologies to the market. E3 Water LLC integrates innovative water and wastewater treatment technologies into markets worldwide with their mobile wastewater treatment technology.

Micro-windmills could supply power for phones, home

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

A research associate and an electrical engineering professor at UT Arlington have designed a micro-windmill capable of generating wind energy, which may one day offer an alternative to cell phone battery recharging, 3D Printer World.com reported. The researchers say it may also prove useful in home energy generation, an application where large windmills are unsightly.

Foundation woes

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Sahadat Hossain, UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, was interviewed as part of a KXAS/NBC 5 investigation into one homeowner’s building issues. Hossain noted the direction of a crack in a wall and a slope in the home’s backyard as indicators of foundation problems.

A team for the future

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg Businessweek, NASDAQ.com, Virtual-Strategy Magazine.com and other media reported that Greenway Innovative Energy has entered into a sponsored research agreement with UT Arlington to further refine and enhance its cutting edge technology, which converts natural gas to clean synthetic fuels. The purpose of the research agreement is to continually improve the existing Fisher-Tropsch synthesis process for the conversion of natural gas into liquid hydrocarbons, or synthetic fuels.

DFW Airport at 40

Friday, May 2, 2014

Airport Chief Executive Sean Donohue said Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport probably will need a sixth terminal by the end of the decade if passenger numbers grow as expected, The Dallas Morning News reported. Donohue also said that DFW Airport might have another Airbus A380 landing soon, a separate Dallas Morning News story reported. Donohue and a number of other policy makers and experts met at UT Arlington for "DFW at 40," a symposium looking at the airport's past, present and future. UT Arlington and The Dallas Morning News sponsored the event.

Debate over Love Field gates

Friday, May 2, 2014

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker said the carrier is using its "best efforts" to ensure that Virgin America is the winner of the two gates at Love Field that it is required to divest as part of its merger settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported in a story carried by Bloomberg Business Week. Parker made the comments during "DFW at 40," a symposium presented by UT Arlington and The Dallas Morning News. A separate Dallas Morning News story said Dallas Mayor Pro Tem Tennell Atkins seemed reluctant to comment on the debate over which airlines should get the two Love Field gates.

Planning for the future

Friday, May 2, 2014

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker said the airline has posted a great profit the last quarter and that new terminals and DART rail service is planned for the airport's future, KXAS NBC 5 reported. Parker spoke at the "DFW at 40" symposium at UT Arlington on Thursday.

April

Electrical engineer promoted

Thursday, April 24, 2014

EF Johnson Technologies Inc. has named Jim Green president and chief executive officer, IT Business Net, KMPH 26 in Fresno, Calif., and several other websites reported. Green holds a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from UT Arlington.

Better bone growth

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington has teamed with Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital to research whether bone growth from a person’s stem cells can replace bone grafts, D Healthcare Daily and the Business Standard reported. Liping Tang, UT Arlington’s bioengineering chair and professor, and Joseph Borrelli, chair of orthopedics for the hospital, are the lead investigators on the project and co-authored a paper published in the online journal PLoS One. 

Targeting a hot field

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington will launch an unmanned vehicle systems certificate program in the fall for engineering students interested in entering that fast-growing industry, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. “There is a lot of activity right now in trying to bring the use of UVS to the civilian application,” Engineering Dean Khosrow Behbehani said. FindLaw ran the Star-Telegram story. WFAA Channel 8 aired a similar story on the certification program.

Slowing cancer

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

UT Arlington physicist Wei Chen was working to create a luminescent nanoparticle to use in security-related radiation detection may have instead happened upon an advance in photodynamic cancer therapy that significantly slowed tumor growth in lab studies, R&D Magazine reported.

Technology for searches

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Texas EquuSearch, a Texas-based group involved in searches for missing persons around the nation, has filed a lawsuit asking a federal court to set aside an order prohibiting the nonprofit organization from employing drones in its work, KRLD 1080 reported. The story mentioned that the UT Arlington Research Institute is part of a statewide push to make unmanned vehicles profitable and safe.

Friday, April 18, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington has announced a new unmanned vehicle systems undergraduate certificate for students interested in careers in one of the nation’s most exciting engineering fields, the website Unmanned Systems Technology reported. The program is a collaboration between the College of Engineering and the UT Arlington Research Institute, which received Federal Aviation Administration approval early this year for unmanned aircraft system test flights at the Institute’s Fort Worth campus.

Unmanned vehicles certification

Monday, April 14, 2014

UT Arlington officials say a booming industry in need of skilled workers has motivated them to launch a new unmanned vehicle systems certification program for undergraduates next fall, according to a KXAS/NBC 5 story that appeared on local NBC news programs in several cities, including Miami; Yakima, Wash.; Sacramento, Calif.; and Colorado Springs, Colo. “We anticipate a rather intense interest in it,” said Khosrow Behbehani, dean of the College of Engineering. UT Arlington’s program will be particularly unique because it is one of just a handful of universities across the country that has been given permission by the federal government to test drones outdoors.

Tissue engineering

Monday, April 14, 2014

Dr. Liping Tang, bioengineering chair and professor at UT Arlington, and Dr. Joseph Borrelli, chair of orthopedics at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital, are working together to solve the problem of healing bone fractures and augmenting bone growth after osteomyelitis, BioNews Texas, Stem Cell News Blog and Innovation Toronto reported. Their new technique, which is detailed in the journal PLoS One, cuts down on cost and surgery time, and enhances patient comfort. 

Creating bone tissue

Friday, April 11, 2014

Several online publications, including R&D Magazine, Science Newsline and NanoWerk, reported on a UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital project to investigate whether bone grown from the body’s own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting. Liping Tang, UT Arlington bioengineering chair and professor, and Dr. Joseph Borrelli, chair of orthopedics for Texas Health Arlington Memorial, hope to use the body’s own healing capacity in bone repair.

Unmanned Vehicle Systems certificate program

Thursday, April 10, 2014

UT Arlington is gearing up to meet the expected growth in the unmanned vehicle systems industry with a new certificate program, according to a report on KRLD/1080 AM. Eileen Clements, director of research at the UT Arlington Research Institute, told the station: “The market’s huge ... You need people who know how to design those systems, who know how to operate them, who know how to maintain them.”

Bone repair

Thursday, April 10, 2014

UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital are investigating whether bone grown from the body’s own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting, according to Hispanic Business.com. Liping Tang, UT Arlington bioengineering chair and professor, and Dr. Joseph Borrelli, chair of orthopedics for Texas Health Arlington Memorial, co-authored a paper on the research. The goal is to use the body’s own healing capacity in bone repair.

Repairing the road

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, is working with the Texas Department of Transportation to mend failing highway slopes with recycled plastic pins, NTX, the North Texas Commission Magazine (p. 56), reported in its spring/summer edition. 

Odd couples

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Several FOX television stations, including WXIX/FOX 19(Cincinnati), mentioned a story that dispelled the idea that opposites attract. The story, which originally appeared on CNN.com, featured research by William Ickes, distinguished professor of psychology at UT Arlington. Ickes said that similar people are more likely to get together in the first place -- and are also more likely to find satisfaction in their relationship.

Automation Technology Expo

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Dan Popa, associate professor of electrical engineering at UT Arlington, will be a guest speaker at a Learning Labs seminar that is part of the upcoming Automation Technology Expo Texas in Fort Worth, Aerospace Journal, Virtual Strategy magazine and numerous others reported.  Popa will speak as part of a session called "Robotic Technology: Strategic Applications in Manufacturing."

Possibilities behind micro-windmills

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Tribology & Lubrication Technology magazine (p.8) featured a story on the energy generating micro-windmills being developed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor. The magazine is published by the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers and read by 4,000 professionals worldwide.

Confined spaces

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Jackson Pettyjohn, a manager in UT Arlington’s Division for Enterprise Development, was featured in the April issue of Underground Construction, discussing how to develop a safety program for confined spaces. He said confined spaces represent one of the most challenging and potentially dangerous scenarios in construction.

Micro manufacturing systems featured

Monday, April 7, 2014

Dan Popa, associate professor of electrical engineering at UT Arlington, was featured on the website Micro Manufacturing explaining how manufacturers deal with adhesive forces that act on the surfaces of objects. Popa is head of the Next Generation Systems Research Group at UT Arlington, which researches best practices in designing microscale manufacturing systems.

Micro-windmill research highlighted

Friday, April 4, 2014

German magazine blog, 123energie, reported on tiny windmills being constructed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor. The team believes the devices could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. 

March

Tiny windmills could power cell phones

Monday, March 31, 2014

Two UT Arlington engineers have invented tiny, working windmills, Fresh Photons.com reported. They propose creating a field of these windmills on a cell phone sleeve, and using them to recharge cell phone batteries.

Friday, March 28, 2014

The mayors of Fort Worth, Dallas and Houston Thursday announced their support for a high-speed rail route between Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. “Building in the urban core will cost more than between cities,” said Steve Mattingly, a University of Texas at Arlington civil engineer who conducted a feasibility study for bringing bullet trains into Dallas-Fort Worth when speaking to the Fort Worth Business Press earlier this year.

Powerful possibilites.. mini windmills

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Looking like the buzzing of a hummingbird’s wing, UT Arlington researchers are working on micro-windmills that have many practical applications, Fort Worth, Texas magazine reported. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering J.C. Chiao is the principal investigator on the research but gives major credit to his former student Dr. Smitha Rao. Chiao said: “The major application will be in charging wireless sensors, like those used to safeguard our decaying infrastructure.”

Discovering speed

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

The Discovery Channel (Canada) featured UT Arlington student engineers on its program, Daily Planet. The students interviewed designed and built a racecar with the goal of competing to win the Formula SAE competition. One of the car’s features is Active Aero technology, which uses a student-developed, on-board computer to open or close the “wings” to reduce drag and increase down force to make the car stick to the road. 

UTA alumnus featured

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Winds of Change, a prominent STEM magazine for American Indian and Alaska Native college students and faculty, featured UT Arlington alumnus Ken Vargas in a story about the Navy. The magazine called that branch of the U.S. Armed Forces one of the top 50 STEM workplaces. Vargas serves as a Navy Facilities Engineering Command Contingency/Disaster Preparedness Officer.

Robots in the kitchen

Monday, March 24, 2014

As part of the 2013 Student Infrared Imaging Competition sponsored by DRS Technologies, students from the UT Arlington Research Institute used a PR2 robot from Willow Garage and an infrared camera from DRS Technologies to perform some basic functions in the kitchen, Vision-Systems.com reported.

Emergency responders training on new faster, more precise radar

Friday, March 21, 2014

National Weather Service meteorologists said a local network of more precise radar units provided quicker and more precise information when a storm system rumbled across North Texas on Saturday, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. However, officials said that the full capabilities of the radar system called CASA, for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere, won’t likely be on display until later this year. So far, only two of the $500,000 radar units — one at The University of Texas at Arlington, the other in Midlothian — are fully operational. Four more are expected to be online soon.

Gridlock no more?

Friday, March 21, 2014

North Texas motorists may not realize it, but since October they have traveled a “living laboratory” designed to minimize gridlock and empower commuters, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. Dallas is one of only two cities piloting the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Integrated Corridor Management System. Sia Ardekani, a UT Arlington civil engineering professor who assisted in the project, said his team worked with DART, the North Central Texas Council of Governments, the Texas Department of Transportation, North Texas Tollway Authority and the cities of Dallas, Plano, Richardson and University Park to make their individual transportation systems work seamlessly through the new system.

Rice Business Plan Competition

Friday, March 21, 2014

UT Arlington's Detonation Dynamics team is one of 42 finalists competing in the 14th annual Rice Business Plan Competition, PressReleasePoint reported. The teams are vying for more than $1 million in prizes in the competition, which is sponsored by Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business. More than 155 past competitors have gone on to successfully launch their ventures and are still in business today. They have raised in excess of $844 million in funding and created more than 1,000 new jobs.

More powerful testing for performance-enhancing drugs

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Researchers have developed a new test to detect performance-enhancing drugs that they say are 1,000 times more sensitive than current methods, Science Codex, Newswise, Science Daily and many other websites reported. UT Arlington's Daniel Armstrong, Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry, led the research team that developed the ultra-sensitive methods of detecting the drugs.

Dr. Gupta talks 'prescription for life'

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s prescription for life is to do something that scares you every day, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. Gupta, CNN’s chief medical correspondent told a crowd of about 2,500 at the University of Texas at Arlington Tuesday night that he struggled with communicating when he first started reporting.

Support needed

Monday, March 17, 2014

While the cause of Allen Eagle Stadium construction problems has yet to be determined, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering said the facility likely could need additional support reinforcements to help ensure the concrete’s durability, The Dallas Morning News reported. Shih-Ho “Simon” Chao, who teaches structural engineering at UT Arlington, said the “alligator pattern” of cracks suggest they are due more to support issues than to bad concrete work. That can be addressed by adding additional support beams without a major overhaul of the facility, Chao said.

Student places third in coding contest

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Tracy Oguni, a student at The University of Texas, Arlington, took third place in the recent Pearson Student Coding Contest, according to a press release featured by Virtual-Strategy Magazine, Boston.com, TMC News and others. Oguni developed Study Buddy, an Android application to help students manage the common problem of scheduling their assignments and study time.

Researchers develop device that could answer cell phone charging issues

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Tiny windmills being developed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor could one day provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation, according to the websites TOMO News and MICROManufacturing Magazine. The machines could also power wireless sensors that detect cracks in bridges, failures in security systems and dryness in soils, according to a McClatchy wire service story that appeared on the websites Energy Central and Energy Biz.

Tiny windmills, large possibilities

Monday, March 3, 2014

Millions of tiny windmills could one day power wireless sensors that detect cracks in bridges, failures in security systems and dryness in soils — all thanks to two University of Texas at Arlington research scientists who were inspired by a little girl’s pinwheel, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. Electrical engineering professor J.C. Chiao and associate researcher Smitha Rao designed the 1.8 millimeter by 2 millimeter micro windmills that are so small 10 would fit on a grain of rice. The tiny windmills also could be used to charge smartphones.

Stadium concerns

Monday, March 3, 2014

Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, was quoted in a WFAA/ABC8 story about cracks found in the concrete of Allen ISD’s new football stadium. He said: "Cracking is fairly common in concrete. The problem is the damage water may cause by getting in the cracks." The story also appeared on KHOU/ABC11 (Houston) and KVUE/ABC33 (Austin).

February

Alloy gives strength to micro-windmills

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington is developing tiny windmills that may actually help power electronics, such as cell phones, and in homes, KDFW/FOX 4 reported. J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate, are working on the technology and Chaio explained the micro-manufacturing process for viewers. “They are going to be very cost effective and you can mass produce them,” he said.

Focus on safety

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

UT Arlington has been granted an FAA certificate of authorization, which allows researchers at their research institute (also known as UTARI) to take part in the lone star unmanned aircraft systems initiative, Fort Worth, Texas magazine reported. The initiative has six such programs operating throughout the nation on drone research. They will be helping the Federal Aviation Administration lay out practical rules to safeguard our airspace. 

Middle-school, high-school students converge on UTA for science, engineering fair

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Almost 700 middle and high school students competed at the University of Texas at Arlington’s College Park Center Monday as part of the 63rd annual Fort Worth Regional Science and Engineering Fair, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. After presenting their projects, students participated in on-campus events sponsored by the Office of University Recruitment, College of Science, College of Engineering, RadioShack and Lockheed Martin.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Two UT Arlington engineers have invented tiny, working windmills, according to a post on NPR’s science Tumblr “Skunk Bear." UT Arlington’s J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate, propose creating a field of these windmills on a cell phone sleeve, and using them to recharge cell phone batteries.

Possible power alternative

Monday, February 24, 2014

World Journal, the largest Chinese-language newspaper in the United States, published a story on power-generating micro-windmill technology being developed by UT Arlington’s J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate. The team is working with a Tiawanese company to explore commercialization possibilities for the new technology.

A more diverse field

Friday, February 21, 2014

The Winston-Salem Journal (N.C,) quoted Judy Corley-Lay, a pavement management engineer and the first woman to earn an engineering degree from UT Arlington, in a story about the North Carolina Department of Transportation’s efforts to broaden the base of women engineers. The number of women in the field has grown and will continue to do so she said, but there is still work to be done. There are still very few women in the highest levels of profession, though she expects that will change as the current crop of female engineers gain experience.

NIH grant awarded to Nguyen

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Phys.org noted that Kytai Nguyen, associate professor of bioengineering at UT Arlington, has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nano-particle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stent procedures to treat coronary arterial disease.

Prepping for test flights

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Just weeks after its designation as one of six federally-approved test sites for unmanned aircraft systems, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi will conduct several test flights over South Texas ranchland to continue research and training on the RS-16 unmanned aerial vehicle, In Flight USA reported. The successful test site bid was a team effort involving the UT Arlington Research Institute and other research institutions and private-sector companies.

Impact & influence

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

A Fort Worth Business Press article noted that several UT Arlington faculty members are leading new, innovative engineering research. Anand Puppala, associate dean of research for the College of Engineering, has been named chair of the National Research Council’s soil mechanics unit. Kytai Nguyen, associate professor of bioengineering, has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nano-particle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stent procedures to treat coronary arterial disease. Four UT Arlington Research Institute faculty members have partnered to develop safety systems for unmanned aircraft. The Dallas Morning News County by County section also recognized Nguyen’s work.

Bucks for bullet trains

Monday, February 17, 2014

Ensuring Fort Worth’s place on a proposed high-speed rail line could boil down to dollars and cents as engineers and transportation officials ponder plans that could reshape local and statewide public transit, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. “Building in the urban core will cost more than between cities,” said Stephen Mattingly, a University of Texas at Arlington civil engineer who conducted a feasibility study for bringing bullet trains into Dallas-Fort Worth.

Rail of the future

Friday, February 14, 2014

Texas Public Radio station KSTX (San Antonio) interviewed Stephen Mattingly, a UT Arlington professor of civil engineering, who wrote a recent feasibility study of all the lines that the Texas Department of Transportation is considering for high-speed rail between Dallas-Fort Worth and some other major cities in Texas. “It’s feasible from a technical perspective but not necessarily from a cost perspective,” Mattingly said. ”The I-45 corridor would be suitable for accommodating it. It would struggle in the urban areas, but in the rural areas it would be very adequate for use.”

Energy for tomorrow

Friday, February 14, 2014

A University of Texas Arlington research associate and electrical engineering professor have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging, and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, Homeland Security News Wire reported.

Advanced radar units in North Texas started with one at UTA

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Dallas-Fort Worth is closer to having a ring of advanced radar units up and running when the spring severe-storm season starts, WFAA.com and Government Technology.com reported. A fourth component of the new radar system was installed Tuesday atop a municipal building in Addison. Over the last year, other units have been deployed at The University of Texas at Arlington, at the University of North Texas in Denton and in Mansfield.

New radar units to give advanced warning

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Dallas-Fort Worth is inching closer to having a ring of advanced radar units up and running when the spring severe-storm season starts, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. A fourth component of the new radar system was installed Tuesday atop a municipal building in Addison. Over the last year, other units have been deployed at The University of Texas at Arlington, at the University of North Texas in Denton and in Mansfield.

Engineering influence

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The Dallas Business Journal’s People on the Move column noted that Anand Puppala, UT Arlington Distinguished Teaching Professor of Civil Engineering and associate dean of research engineering, has been named chair of the National Research Council’s soil mechanics unit.

Editorial lauds engineering enrollment increase

Monday, February 10, 2014

The second-largest school in the University of Texas System is educating more Texans than ever before, an editorial in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram said. Preliminary figures released by UT Arlington show a record for in-state enrollment with 34,249 taking classes this spring. “But the most interesting and encouraging part of the report is the dramatic increase in the number of students in the school’s engineering programs,” the editorial said.

Friday, February 7, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures to treat coronary arterial disease, MDT Magazine, NewsWise and many other websites reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, said the research looks to improve an established procedure like angioplasty, which opens arteries and blood vessels that are blocked. The nanoparticles would recruit stem cells to aid in the healing of the arterial walls. She is co-principal investigator with Jian Yang, a bioengineering associate professor at Penn State and a former associate professor here. The article featured Yang's work in biofluorescent polymers.

Friday, February 7, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have designed a micro-windmill that could ultimately power cell phone batteries and other devices, Co.Exist reported. J.-C. Chiao, electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, research associate, developed the system that employs a nickel alloy on the windmill for strength and durability.

New path forward

Thursday, February 6, 2014

In-state enrollment at The University of Texas at Arlington has reached another record high, with 34,249 students taking classes this spring, up 459 from this time last year, according to preliminary figures, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. It is the third straight year that the university, which also reports that 3,652 out-of-state students are enrolled in online courses, has set an enrollment record. Growth this spring is largely attributed to enrollment increases of 768 students, or 19 percent, in the College of Engineering, 137 students, or 9.5 percent, in the School of Social Work and 302 students, or 3.8 percent, in the College of Nursing.

Help for the heart

Thursday, February 6, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures to treat coronary arterial disease, Phys.org, R&D, Stem Cell Therapy, News Medical, Viet Bao Daily News Online and several other websites reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, said the research looks to improve an established procedure like angioplasty, which opens arteries and blood vessels that are blocked. The nanoparticles would recruit stem cells to aid in the healing of the arterial walls.

Upward enrollment

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

The student population at The University of Texas at Arlington has grown beyond 34,000 for the first time, NBC 5/KXAS reported. The university said Tuesday it had 34,329 students enrolled in classes for the Spring 2014 semester. If the number of out-of-state online students are included in the total, that number climbs to nearly 38,000. The school said the population increase is "buoyed by strong growth in the College of Engineering and sustained demand for College of Nursing programs."

Heart healing

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system to shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures to treat coronary arterial disease, Nanowerk and Bio-Medicine reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, is leading the research.

Wind equals energy

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have developed a micro-windmill system that could eventually recharge cell phone batteries with a mere wave of the hand-held device, IT Management reported. Electrical Engineering Professor J.-C. Chiao and Research Associate Smitha Rao led the research.

Next generation science

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Four student leaders of the Next Generation Scientists for Biodiesel have added their voices to a cry that biodiesel supporters hope the Environmental Protection Agency hears, AgriMarketing reported. Deval Pandya of UT Arlington serves on the NGSB board and was one of the student authors who submitted comments this week to EPA staff expressing concern about proposed cuts to the federal Renewable Fuel Standard. The NGSB is a student organization designed to assist in the professional development of emerging science leaders with a passion for sustainability by offering opportunities to integrate with the biodiesel scientific community.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Al Jazeera America reported on the Unmanned Vehicles Consortium conference held recently at the UT Arlington Research Institute and focused on the work Frank Lewis, electrical engineering professor, is doing on an unmanned aerial vehicle called the quad-rotor.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineer has received a four-year, $1.4 million National Institutes of Health grant to create a nanoparticle system that can shore up arterial walls following angioplasty and stenting procedures performed to treat coronary arterial disease, Hispanic Business and Renewable Energy World reported. Kytai Nguyen, a UT Arlington associate professor of bioengineering, said the research looks to improve established procedures used to open blocked arteries and blood vessels. Nguyen’s work also was mentioned in Medical Express and BioTexas News, along with additional work of a co-principal investigator, Jian Yang, a current bioengineering associate professor at Penn State and a former UT Arlington bioengineering associate professor.

Gaining momentum

Monday, February 3, 2014

Kevin Schug, UT Arlington associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, was featured in Momentum, Shimadzu Scientific Instruments' magazine. The article outlined Schug's research on analyzing the environmental effects of extracting shale gas in North Texas and how Shimadzu instruments contribute to his work. Shimadzu has donated more than $10 million to help create the Shimadzu Center for Advanced Analytical Chemistry and the Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies at UT Arlington.

Recharge to the rescue

Monday, February 3, 2014

J.-C. Chiao and Smitha Rao, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor and research associate, respectively, have developed a new micro-windmill technology that could shake up the power industry and make emergency recharges for devices possible, Adafruit Industries reported.

January

Origami and engineering

Friday, January 31, 2014

Micro-windmills that UT Arlington researchers designed could some day be used to charge cell phone batteries and provide temporary power for other devices, Boing Boing and EE Journal reported. J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate, developed the MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) using recesses similar to the way integrated circuits are manufactured combined with the origami-like self-assembly techniques.

Rail green-lighted

Friday, January 31, 2014

The Texas Transportation Commission has given the green light to forming a high-speed rail commission to oversee a bullet train project between Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas Public Radio reported. TxDOT funded Stephen Mattingly, an associate professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, to study the possibility of connecting all major Texas with high speed rail.

The power of a micro-windmill system

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have designed a micro-windmill system that could make emergency recharges for cell phones as easy as blowing on your phone, Wired reported. Professor J.C. Chiao and Research Associate Smitha Rao of UT Arlington have developed a new windmill technology that could shake up the power industry and make emergency recharges possible. Unlike the industrial giants that sit in off-shore windfarms, these diminutive devices measure just 1.8 millimeters at their widest point and 10 could fit on a grain of rice.

High-speed rail plans in Texas

Thursday, January 30, 2014

KHOU/Channel 11 in Houston reported on high-speed rail plans in Texas and quoted Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, who said there is an increasing likelihood of developing such a system. "There is a strong chance that we could see it within 10 years. However, there is no guarantee... and I would not like to see any public money committed to an endeavor like this until we see that it really is going to happen," he said. The story initially appeared on WFAA/ABC 8.

Rallying for a Rail

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, told WFAA/ABC 8 that there is an increasing likelihood that high-speed rail will come to Texas. "There is a strong chance that we could see it within 10 years. However, there is no guarantee... and I would not like to see any public money committed to an endeavor like this until we see that it really is going to happen," said Mattingly, in advance of a Texas high-speed rail commission being established this week. The WFAA story also ran on KVUE in Austin.

Unmanned systems conference

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Fox 4 at Noon reported on Monday's unmanned systems conference at the UT Arlington Research Institute. The conference focused on on unmanned systems well beyond the known military applications. A major workforce development and training grant also was announced. The Research Institute is participating in the Texas test site program for unmanned aerial vehicles.

The power of micro windmills

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have developed miniature windmills that could eventually power cell phone batteries and serve other small-use power needs, ThisWeekInFM.com reported. J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, have produced the working micro-windmills.

Test flights

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute received an FAA certificate of authorization last week as part of its efforts to boost unmanned aerial vehicle research and study, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. UT Arlington and several other universities agreed to become part of the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Initiative, which is led by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. That initiative is part of the nationwide effort to get unmanned aerial vehicles airborne by 2015. The Research Institute and Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation hosted an unmanned vehicle conference Monday. The Dallas Morning News also reported on the daylong conference.

Advancing unmanned systems

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute is part of a statewide push to get in on the ground floor of unmanned vehicle research and technology, KTVT/CBS 11, WFAA/Channel 8 and KDFW/Fox 4 reported. The Research Institute and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation sponsored a daylong conference about unmanned vehicles. The Institute secured an FAA certificate of authorization to fly the unmanned aerial vehicles on that campus.

Conference highlights unmanned systems

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation hosted a conference Monday on unmanned systems, the Associated Press reported. The AP story was carried by ABC 13 and Fox 26 in Houston, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Austin American-Statesman, the San Antonio Express-News, KSLA 12 in Shreveport, La., KXXV 25 in Waco and many other media websites.

Tiny windmills

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have designed a micro-windmill that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, Accessible Technology and TechNet reported. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Powering up

Monday, January 27, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have designed a MEMS-based "micro-windmill" that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, Oilprice.com and ItThing.com reported. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Mass matters

Monday, January 27, 2014

A UT Arlington engineering professor has proven that the effect of mass is important, can be measured and has a significant impact on any calculations and measurements at the sub-micrometer scale, IPS Cell Therapy and Space Daily reported. The findings help to better understand movement of nano-sized objects in fluid environments. The unconventional results are consistent with Newton's Second Law of Motion, a well-established law of physics, and imply that mass should be included in the dynamic model of these nano-systems. The most widely accepted models omit mass at that scale.

Planning for rail

Monday, January 27, 2014

Bill Meadows, a former Fort Worth City Council member, is expected to chair the high-speed rail commission, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. A Star-Telegram editorial said a UT Arlington study laid out several suggested railway routes. The preferred is along I-30 connecting Dallas, Arlington and Fort Worth.

Micro windmill research continues to capture media's attention

Friday, January 24, 2014

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have designed a MEMS-based "micro-windmill" that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, the EE Times said in its Power Week-In-Review. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Bowling's newly published research

Friday, January 24, 2014

BioNews Texas and Space Daily featured research byAlan Bowling, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UT Arlington, and Samarendra Mohanty, an assistant physics professor, on the relationship of mass to calculations at the sub-micrometer scale. Their newly published work says the effect of mass is important, can be measured and has a significant impact on any calculations and measurements.

Micro windmills

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

UT Arlington electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao was interviewed on FOX Business about his work designing a micro-windmill that generates wind energy. Chiao and co-designer Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, believe the devices could be used to charge cell phones or other devices. “You will never run out of energy and you don’t have to go change the battery for those devices,” he said. The websites Electronic Engineering, IT World, Clean Technica, and Technology Tell also reported on the technology.

Need for speed

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

A study by Steve Mattingly, associate professor of civil engineering at UT Arlington, was cited in a Dallas Morning News story focusing on what a high-speed rail system from Dallas to Houston could mean for the environment. Mattingly found the quickest approach for a new system is to put routes along interstate highways.

Alum co-produces new album

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Kelcy Warren, a distinguished alumnus of the UT Arlington College of Engineering, was featured in a Dallas Morning News story about a new album he co-produced called Looking Into You: A Tribute to Jackson Browne. Warren is CEO and chairman of the Fortune 500 titan Energy Transfer Partners.

An energy harvest

Friday, January 17, 2014

UT Arlington research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao have designed a micro-wind turbine that generates power and may become an unusual solution to charging cell phone batteries and other small, wireless, or remote sensing devices, the websites The Blaze and Windpower Engineering & Development reported.  Because of the small sizes, flat panels with thousand of windmills also could be made and mounted on the walls of houses or building to harvest energy for lighting, security, or environmental sensing and wireless communication.

Flying high

Friday, January 17, 2014

About two weeks after winning approval as one of only a handful of federal test sites, researchers from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi are putting their unmanned remote-controlled aircraft, or drones, in the air this week for another round of test flights, according to an Associated Press story. Texas is among six states designated by the Federal Aviation Administration to develop test sites for drones and the UT Arlington Research Institute is a partner on the project.

The power of tiny windmills

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Time magazine’s Tech section reported that researchers at The University of Texas Arlington say they have designed tiny windmills that could hook up to a cellphone and convert wind into battery life. The designers, electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao and graduate research associate Smitha Rao, drew from traditional origami concepts and modern semiconductor device layouts to create the tiny power plants. Websites such as Computerworld, Men’s Fitness, Network World and the Dallas Observer also reported on the research.

Weather Channel, Discovery Canada report on micro-windmill

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Several news outlets, including The Weather Channel, Discovery Canada, Business Insider, eCampusNews and the websites DVice and Inhabitat, featured stories on tiny windmills being developed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor. The team believes the devices could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. Their work also gained attention from additional media based outside the U.S., such as Canadian radio station CJBK/Newstalk 1290 and German website called Mittelstands Nachrichten.

Interaction will be part of research process

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

A new Research and Learning Center at the Forth Worth Science and History Museum brings research from The University of Texas at Arlington to a science venue that is already a favorite with children, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and KERA/90.1 FM reported. Students from UTA or other universities partnering with the program can apply to use the research center to gather data for investigations that touch on the brain and learning, organizers said at an announcement of its opening Tuesday. KXAS/NBC 5 also reported the announcement in their midday report.

FAA test sites for unmanned systems includes UT Arlington Research Institute

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Just weeks after its designation as one of six federally-approved test sites for unmanned aircraft systems, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi will conduct several test flights over South Texas ranch land to continue research and training on the RS-16 unmanned aerial vehicle, according to a General Aviation News story that also mentioned UT Arlington. The successful FAA test site bid was a team effort involving A&M-Corpus Christi, the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute and others.

Micro-windmill technology could help recharge cell phone batteries

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Numerous news outlets, including The Washington Post, San Antonio Express-News, Houston Chronicle, R&D Magazine, Geek.com, Grist and Tech Investor News reported on a UT Arlington team’s development of micro-windmills that could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, are working with a Taiwanese company to explore commercialization possibilities for the new technology.

University, FW Museum team up for learning center

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Today, The University of Texas at Arlington and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History will announce a Research and Learning Center at the museum, a collaboration that allows scientists to engage with the public they study, which will invite museum visitors to participate in short research interactions lasting no more than 15 minutes, according to the Fort Worth Business Press. The project will be guided by the University’s Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education. KXAS/NBC 5 also featured a report this morning on the center's opening.

Forbes, many media outlets report on UT Arlington's micro-windmill

Monday, January 13, 2014

Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and could become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, according to numerous websites, including ForbesElectronic Engineering JournalThe VergeNanotechnology TodayGizmodoCNET and others. UT Arlington has reached an agreement with a Taiwanese company to explore the discovery's commercialization opportunities. KRLD/1080 AM also featured a report on the technology this morning.

University center teaming with Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

Monday, January 13, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History have announced the launch of the Research and Learning Center at the Fort Worth museum. The collaboration allows scientists to interact with the public by enabling museum visitors to participate in short research interactions, the websites PhysOrg and HispanicBusiness.com reported. The Center opens Jan. 14 and is a partnership between the museum and UT Arlington's College of Education. It will be guided by the University's Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education.

Magazine story features student racing innovation

Friday, January 10, 2014

Racecar Engineering magazine prominently featured an article written by Bob Woods, UT Arlington professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and graduate student James Merkel, about the University's Formula Team’s engineering innovation. They detailed how UT Arlington has been at the forefront of innovation "with the introduction of a combined hand clutch and shifter mechanism that allows for two pedals and left foot braking, the first introduction of electronic fuel injection, carbon composite wheels, the first full aero package with multi-element wings, several iterations of unsuspended aero packages, and now the first fully-active four-quadrant aerodynamic package.”

Davis outlines education plan

Friday, January 10, 2014

During an education roundtable Thursday at UT Arlington, state Sen. Wendy Davis unveiled a plan to put more teachers in public classrooms throughout the state, the Associated Press, Texas Tribune, Dallas Morning News, Star-Telegram, Houston Chronicle and other media reported.

High-speed rail study noted

Friday, January 10, 2014

CultureMap Dallas and CultureMap Houston mentioned a UT Arlington study exploring high-speed rail options along the state’s highway system in its story about DFW to Houston high-speed rail study being launched by the federal government.

Professor's high-speed rail study cited

Thursday, January 9, 2014

Dallas Morning News story on a DFW to Houston high-speed rail study being launched by the federal government cited a November study by UT Arlington that examined the feasibility of high-speed rail. The study, conducted by Steve Mattingly, associate professor of civil engineering, showed that high-speed rail was more efficient than air and highway travel - no matter which two big cities you were linking, and it was possible using existing TXDOT right-of-way.

Weighty issues

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Authint Mail noted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering that suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter.

Studying a quicker trip

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

D Magazine’s Frontburner noted research by UT Arlington in its story about a DFW to Houston high-speed rail line study being launched by the federal government and the Texas Department of Transportation. Researchers from UT Arlington conducted a study in November 2013 providing benefits of high-speed trains along major Texas highways. KETK/NBC Tyler and other media outlets carried the story.

Collaboration for health

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

A team of advanced mathematicians from UT Arlington is collaborating with UT Southwestern Medical Center and PCCI, a major scientific partner, to develop clinical prediction models using Bayesian modeling approaches, Reuters.com and other media reported. The National Science Foundation grant project is one of three prestigious grants awarded to UTSW exceeding $30 million.

Bolen's contributions

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

The Star-Telegram highlighted the many contributions of late Fort Worth Mayor Bob Bolen that included bringing the former UT Arlington Advanced Robotics Research Institute to Fort Worth. The city’s longest-serving mayor, known for working 60-hour weeks during his tenure in 1982-91, died early Monday. He was 87.

Earth's measurements

Monday, January 6, 2014

Discovery News.com highlighted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, which suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter. Dark matter is thought to make up about 80 percent of the universe’s matter, but scientists have been unable to determine much else about it, including its presence in the solar system. “The nice thing about GPS satellites is that we know their orbits really, really well,” Harris said. From nine months of data on the satellites in the GLONASS, GPS and Galileo groups, he calculated Earth’s mass as “felt” by each one.

Collaboration noted

Monday, January 6, 2014

Newstalk Texas, a blog of the Texas A&M University Real Estate Center, reported that faculty at The University of Texas at Arlington will participate in Federal Aviation Administration-supported research led by Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi for unmanned aerial systems, a project that will help advance the U.S. drone industry.

Kudos for contest win

Monday, January 6, 2014

The Star-Telegram’s Cheers & Jeers column acknowledged a team of UT Arlington undergraduate engineering students that took first place and a $10,000 prize in an AT&T “It Can Wait” coding contest by creating an app that discourages texting and driving.

Measuring the Earth

Friday, January 3, 2014

New Scientist, Business Standard and UPI.com highlighted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, that suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter. Dark matter is thought to make up about 80 percent of the universe’s matter, but scientists have been unable to determine much else about it, including its presence in the solar system. “The nice thing about GPS satellites is that we know their orbits really, really well,” Harris said. From nine months of data on the satellites in the GLONASS, GPS and Galileo groups, he calculated Earth’s mass as “felt” by each one.

Coding contest win

Thursday, January 2, 2014

A team of UT Arlington undergraduate engineering students took first place and a $10,000 prize in an AT&T “It Can Wait” coding contest by creating an app that discourages texting and driving, the Star-Telegram reported. The team — none of them had taken smart phone programming courses — beat out 25 teams in the second annual AT&T Coding Competition that took place during a 12-week period. The Dallas Morning News also reported on the team’s win.

New fuel method

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Fuel Competition.org and Open Fuel Standard.org noted that a method for creating methanol using CO2 and sunlight, developed at The University of Texas at Arlington, uses very little electrical power and can be "scaled up to an industrial scale to allow some of the CO2 emitted from electrical power plants to be captured and converted into" methanol. This would make electric cars even greener because the CO2 generated for electricity is captured and used.

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