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College Hosts NSF CAREER Conference for Early Career CSE Faculty

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Nearly 100 early career computer science faculty from universities across the United States attended a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Workshop at UT Arlington May 17 to ask questions and learn how to have the best chance of receiving a CAREER Award.

NSF Program Directors Ted Baker, Darleen Fisher, Tanya Korelsky, Todd Leen, John Reppy, and Jeremy Epstein answered questions about the CAREER Award.

NSF Program Directors Ted Baker, Darleen Fisher, Tanya Korelsky, Todd Leen, John Reppy, and Jeremy Epstein answered questions about the CAREER Award.

Organized by UTA Computer Science and Engineering professor Sajal Das and Senior Associate Dean Lynn Peterson, the workshop was sponsored by the NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), in part because it is in the Foundation’s best interests to have outstanding proposals from which to choose CAREER Awards.

Prior to the workshop, attendees were asked to review four proposals, which they reviewed again at the workshop to find out if they were on track. They also had to write a summary of their own proposal.

At UTA, attendees attended question-and-answer sessions and participated in small group mock panels and a proposal writing clinic hosted by NSF Program Directors Ted Baker, Darleen Fisher, Tanya Korelsky, Todd Leen, John Reppy, and Jeremy Epstein. Fisher also gave a presentation about the NSF CAREER program that underscored the importance of including the requirements of integrated research and teaching.

In addition, six past awardees – including UTA Computer Science and Engineering Associate Professor Matthew Wright – participated in a panel discussion, sharing their experiences and allowing attendees to ask questions.

Past winners of the CAREER Award shared their experiences with attendees.

Past winners of the CAREER Award shared their experiences with attendees.

“The program directors were very willing to provide feedback, and the past awardees talked about things like, ‘It took me three tries. Here’s what I did to improve on the second try, and here’s what I did on the third try,’” said Peterson. “That’s the value in this workshop. If someone had done this for me, it would’ve been great. To get the real scoop on what it takes for a successful proposal is very helpful.”

The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.

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