cid

commissaire inspector dottore

a bibliography of detective-inspector novels


tony hillerman

the leaphorn/chee series

The Blessing Way. New York: Harper, 1970.
 ∴  Wolf ohne Fährte. Translated by Gisela Stege. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1972.
 ∴  La voie de l'ennemi. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1990.
 ∴  Il canto del nemico. Translated by Sara Giuntoli. Milano: Mondadori, 1993.
 ∴  Välsignelsens väg. Translated by Lena Schultz. Stockholm: Legenda, 1996.

Dance Hall of the Dead. New York: Harper, 1973.
 ∴  Schüsse aus der Steinzeit. Translated by Helmut Eilers. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1976.
 ∴  La dove danzano i morti. Translated by Walter Molon. Milano: Mondadori, 1983.
 ∴  Là où dansent les morts. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1986.
 ∴  De dødes dansesal. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1993.

Listening Woman. New York: Harper, 1978.
 ∴  Lyttende kvinde. Translated by Mogens Cohrt. København: Spektrum, 1979.
 ∴  Kvinnan som lyssnade. Translated by K. Arne Blom. Malmö: Bergh, 1979.
 ∴  Femme qui écoute. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1988.
 ∴  Das Labyrinth der Geister. Translated by Friedrich A. Hofschuster. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1989.

People of Darkness. New York: Harper, 1980.
 ∴  Le peuple de l'ombre. Translated by Jane Fillon. Paris: Gallimard, 1981.
 ∴  Tod der Maulwürfe. Translated by Friedrich A. Hofschuster. München: Goldmann, 1982.
 ∴  Mørkets folk. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1987.
 ∴  El pueblo de las sombras. Translated by María Antonia Menini. Barcelona: Grijalbo, 1990.

The Dark Wind. New York: Harper, 1982.
 ∴  Le vent sombre. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1986.
 ∴  Den mørke vind. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1988.
 ∴  Vendaval de tineblas. Translated by María Antonia Menini. Barcelona: Grijalbo, 1990.
 ∴  Il vento oscuro. Translated by Stefano Negrini. Milano: Mondadori, 1991.
 ∴  Mörka vinden. Translated by Karl G. & Lilian Fredriksson. Stockholm: Legenda, 1991.
 ∴  Der Wind des Bösen. Translated by Klaus Fröba. Hamburg: Goldman, 1996.

The Ghostway. New York: Harper, 1984.
 ∴  La voie du fantôme. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1987.
 ∴  Das Tabu der Totengeister. Translated by Klaus Fröba. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1987.
 ∴  Rejse efter døden. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1988.
 ∴  Sendero de los espiritus. Translated by Magdalena Duran. Madrid: Jucar, 1988.
 ∴  La via dei fantasmi. Translated by Mariapaola Dèttore. Milano: Mondadori, 1993.

Skinwalkers. New York: Harper, 1986.
 ∴  Die Nacht der skinwalkers. Translated by Klaus Fröba. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1988.
 ∴  Gengangerne. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1989.
 ∴  Porteurs-de-peau. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1990.
 ∴  Los espíritus del aire. Translated by Marco Aurelio Galmarini. Barcelona: Versal, 1990.
 ∴  Odjuret. Translated by Ulf Gyllenhak. Stockholm: Legenda, 1992.
 ∴  Lo stregone deve morire. Translated by Mariapaola Dettore. Milano: Mondadori, 1994.
 ∴  La notte degli sciamani. Casale Monferrato: Piemme, 2005.

A Thief of Time. New York: Harper, 1988.
 ∴  Gravrøveren. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1989.
 ∴  Le voleur de temps. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1989.
 ∴  Ladrón de tiempo. Barcelona: Versal, 1989.
 ∴  Tidstjuven. Translated by Karl G. & Lilian Fredriksson. Stockholm: Legenda, 1989.
 ∴  Wer die Vergangenheit stiehlt. Translated by Klaus Fröba. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1990.
 ∴  Haugbrjótar. Translated by Álfheiður Kjartansdóttir. Reykjavík: Ugla, 1990.
 ∴  Ladri del tempo. Translated by A.M. Francavilla. Milano: Mondadori, 1990.

Talking God. New York: Harper, 1989.
 ∴  Nattens sang. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1990.
 ∴  Dieu qui parle. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1990.
 ∴  Die sprechende Maske. Translated by Peter Prange. Stuttgart: Weitbrecht, 1990.
 ∴  La conspiración de las máscaras. Translated by Eduardo G. Murillo. Barcelona: Grijalbo, 1990.
 ∴  Talande Guden. Translated by Karl G. & Lilian Fredriksson. Stockholm: Legenda, 1990.
 ∴  La maschera del Dio parlante. Translated by Stefano Negrini. Milano: Mondadori, 1991.
 ∴  Talandi Guð. Translated by Þorbergur Þorsson. Reykjavík: Ugla, 1992.

Coyote Waits. New York: Harper, 1990.
 ∴  Prærieulv venter. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1991.
 ∴  Coyote attend. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1991.
 ∴  Un coyote acecha. Translated by María Antonia Menini. Barcelona: Grijalbo, 1991.
 ∴  Coyote väntar. Translated by Ulf Gyllenhak. Stockholm: Legenda, 1991.
 ∴  Der Kojote wartet. Translated by Wulf Bergner. München: Goldmann, 1992.
 ∴  La fame del coyote. Translated by Stefano Negrini. Milano: Mondadori, 1992.

Sacred Clowns. New York: Harper, 1993.
 ∴  L'ultima danza del sacro giullare. Translated by M. Walter. Milano: Mondadori, 1994.
 ∴  Guddommelige gøglere. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1995.
 ∴  Geistertänzer. Translated by Klaus Fröba. München: Goldmann, 1995.
 ∴  Presidentens stav. Translated by Lena Schultz. Stockholm: Legenda, 1995.
 ∴  Les clowns sacrés. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Rivages, 1996.

The Fallen Man. New York: HarperCollins, 1996.
 ∴  L'ombra del deserto. Translated by Nicoletta Lamberti. Milano: Mondadori, 1997.
 ∴  Bjerget med vinger. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1998.
 ∴  Un homme est tombé. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 1998.
 ∴  Tod am heiligen Berg. Translated by Klaus Fröba. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1998.
 ∴  På fall. Translated by Lena Schultz. Stockholm: Legenda, 1998.

The First Eagle. New York: HarperCollins, 1998.
 ∴  Den første ørn. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 1999.
 ∴  Le premier aigle. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 1999.
 ∴  Il mistero della riserva indiana. Translated by Maura Parolini & Matteo Curtoni. Casale Monferrato: Piemme, 1999.
 ∴  Die Spur des Adlers. Translated by Fried Eickhoff. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 2000.

Hunting Badger. New York: HarperCollins, 1999.
 ∴  Blaireau se cache. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 2000.
 ∴  Morte nel canyon. Casale Monferrato: Piemme, 2000.
 ∴  Jagten på Grævling. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 2001.
 ∴  Dachsjagd. Translated by Fried Eickhoff. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 2001.
 ∴  Polowanie na borsuka. Translated by Piotr Art. In Przyjdz i mnie zabij. Warszawa: Przeglad, 2001.
 ∴  La caza. Translated by Concha Cardeñoso. Barcelona: Diagonal, 2001.

The Wailing Wind. New York: HarperCollins, 2002.
 ∴  Le vent qui gémit. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 2003.
 ∴  Das goldene Kalb. Translated by Fried Eickhoff. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 2003.
 ∴  Notte di Halloween. Casale Monferrato: Piemme, 2004.
 ∴  Vindens gråd. Translated by Søren K. Barsøe. Århus: Klim, 2007.

The Sinister Pig. New York: HarperCollins, 2003.
 ∴  Le cochon sinistre. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 2004.
 ∴  Dunkle Kanäle. Translated by Fried Eickhoff. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 2004.

Skeleton Man. New York: HarperCollins, 2004.
 ∴  L'homme squelette. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 2006.
 ∴  Der Skelett-Mann. Translated by Fried Eickhoff. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 2006.
 ∴  El hombre esqeleto. Translated by Carlos Roberto Ramírez Fuentes. In La regla de los dos minutos. México: Reader's Digest, 2006.
 ∴  Skeleton Man. Translated by Giovanni Zucca. Milano: Rizzoli, 2010.

The Shape Shifter. New York: HarperCollins, 2006.
 ∴  Le chagrin entre les fils. Translated by Danièle & Pierre Bondil. Paris: Payot & Rivages, 2007.

I wouldn't call Tony Hillerman's Sinister Pig a great Krimi, possibly not even a very good one. The plot revolves around a dastardly, callous international supervillain named Winsor. Winsor profits off a literal drug pipeline from Mexico while frustrating federal efforts to end the War on Drugs (because to do so would break his monopoly and cheapen his product). Winsor dates a string of impressionable girlfriends and has them murdered when they misbehave.

This would seem far from Hillerman's usual milieu, where Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn and Sergeant Jim Chee investigate murders in the Navajo Nation, except that Winsor has had somebody murdered in the course of his fiendish activities, and that person has landed in Chee's territory. Add in another part of the puzzle happening down by the Mexican border, where Chee's love interest Bernadette Manuelito has gotten a job as a customs agent, and the plot thickens.

Why isn't it a good book? The plot, action, and characters are interesting, but the premise rings false. The big picture involves a massive drug conspiracy rolled up in an even larger, decades-old conspiracy to defraud Indian tribes of their mineral rights. Our heroes (including the retired Leaphorn) investigate this massive web of mischief by driving around and looking at stuff. In fact the corporate spy who's gotten himself killed to kick the action off in the opening chapter was … driving around and looking at stuff. As the characters themselves say at several points, driving around and looking at stuff is not really the way to go about breaking enormous white-collar crime rings. Patient work in the archives, following money trails, is what's really necessary. Whereupon they go out and … drive around looking at stuff.

More interesting, then, are the topics that the novel speaks to. Hillerman has his characters muse about the War on Drugs, illegal immigration, and Indian rights to natural resources. He does this with a broad brush, but the book engages and teaches as it entertains. One senses in such books that the author would like to write essays, journalism, or perhaps even book-length nonfiction about various topical issues. But such prose would draw little interest from publishers or readers, even with an established author's name attached.

So the more effective rhetorical course is to work the topical material into an installment of a proven detective-inspector series. Now, I can't claim that The Sinister Pig is a very good novel about history and politics, either. But like many another Krimi, it tries to raise the reader's consciousness: specifically, about expropriation of Native resources and the futile hypocrisy of the drug war. Hillerman introduces these topics in a caricatured way (the super-villain drug dealer, the untold billions in diverted revenues). But there's a kind of collateral rhetorical appeal in introducing them at all. As we read through to find out whether our heroes will survive and foil the super-villain, we get exposed to arguments, even stick-figure arguments, about our society and our environment.

Hillerman clearly participates in progressive discourse on the issues of native rights and the drug war. He's less progressive on gender matters. Manuelito gets a large percentage of the novel's focus. She's made a career move to go to the border and work for Customs. But the move has been prompted in large part by her desire to get away from Chee, who has been half-heartedly courting her. If he isn't going to propose – heck, even propose a date – she'd rather not constantly be in his presence.

Manuelito has law-enforcement experience, but fails to dominate the action scenes (some not-quite-so-bad guys take away her gun, and end up shooting the supervillain with it, though her struggles help them defeat him). She ends up admitting to Chee that she wants to be a wife and mother back home with him, instead of being a cop. One is never quite sure what to make of such characters. Realistically, Bernie could certainly exist. She does about as well at action-hero police work as I would. But even realistic fiction is never "realistic." It is always a metonym for how we think the world should work, a metonym that competes with others in weaving the cultural work of fiction around our realities. And through Bernie, Hillerman is telling us that a satisfying, desirable woman (desired by a long-standing series detective hero) is basically not up to the challenges of her husband-to-be's profession.

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