cid

commissaire inspector dottore

a bibliography of detective-inspector novels


mons kallentoft

the malin fors series

Midvinterblod. Stockholm: Natur och Kultur, 2007.
 ∴  Mittwinterblut. Translated by Dagmar Lendt. Hamburg: Wunderlich, 2007.
 ∴  Midvinterblod. Translated by Lilian Kingo. København: Gyldendal, 2008.
 ∴  Hiver. Translated by Max Stadler & Lucile Clauss. Le Serpent à Plumes, 2009.
 ∴  Vetrarblóð. Translated by Hjalti Rögnvaldsson. Akranes: Undirheimar, 2010.
 ∴  Sangue di mezz'inverno. Translated by Alessandro Storti. Milano: Nord, 2010.
 ∴  Ofiara w srodku zimy. Translated by Bratumila Pawlowska-Pettersson. Poznan: Rebis, 2010.
 ∴  Sacrificio de invierno. Translated by Carmen Montes Cano. Madrid: Maeva, 2010.
 ∴  Midwinter Sacrifice. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2011. Reprinted as Midwinter Blood. New York: Atria, 2012.

Sommardöden. Stockholm: Natur och Kultur, 2008.
 ∴  Sommerdøden. Translated by Lilian Kingo. København: Gyldendal, 2008.
 ∴  Blut soll euer Zeichen sein. Translated by Christel Hildebrandt. Hamburg: Wunderlich, 2009.
 ∴  Été. Translated by Max Stadler & Lucile Clauss. Le Serpent à Plumes, 2010.
 ∴  Smierc letnia pora. Translated by Bratumila Pawlowska-Pettersson. Poznan: Rebis, 2010.
 ∴  Sumardauðinn. Translated by Ísak Harðarson. Akranes: Undirheimar, 2011.
 ∴  Buio d'estate. Translated by Alessandro Storti. Milano: Nord, 2011.
 ∴  Summertime Death. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2012. Reprinted as Summer Death. New York: Atria, 2013.

Höstoffer. Stockholm: Natur och Kultur, 2009.
 ∴  Høstoffer. Translated by Lilian Kingo. København: Gyldendal, 2010.
 ∴  Automne. Translated by Max Stadler & Lucile Clauss. Le Serpent à Plumes, 2011.
 ∴  Morte d'autunno. Translated by Alessandro Storti. Milano: Nord, 2011.
 ∴  Jesienna sonata. Translated by Anna Krochmal & Robert Kedzierski. Poznan: Rebis, 2011.
 ∴  Autumn Killing. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2012.
 ∴  Haustfórn. Translated by Ísak Harðarson. Akranes: Undirheimar, 2012.
 ∴  Blutrecht. Translated by Christel Hildebrandt. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 2013.

Vårlik. Stockholm: Natur och Kultur, 2010.
 ∴  Printemps. Translated by Frédéric Fourreau. Le Serpent à Plumes. 2011.
 ∴  Zlo budzi sie wiosna. Translated by Inga Sawicka. Poznan: Rebis, 2012.
 ∴  Forårslig. Translated by Lilian Kingo. København: People's, 2013.
 ∴  Savage Spring. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2013. Reprinted as Spring Remains. New York: Washington Square, 2015.
 ∴  Vorlík. Translated by Jón Þ. Þór. Reykjavík: Ugla, 2015.

Den femte årstiden. Stockholm: Natur och Kultur, 2011.
 ∴  Piata pora roku. Translated by Bratumila Pawlowska-Pettersson. Poznan: Rebis, 2012.
 ∴  La 5e saison. Translated by Lucile Clauss & Emmanuel Curtil. Paris: Seuil, 2013.
 ∴  The Fifth Season. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2014.
 ∴  Den femte årstid. Translated by Lilian Kingo. København: People's, 2015.
 ∴  Fimmta árstíðin. Translated by Jón Þ. Þór. Reykjavík: Ugla, 2016.

Vattenänglar. Stockholm: Forum, 2012.
 ∴  Wodne anioly. Translated by Anna Krochmal & Robert Kedzierski. Poznan: Rebis, 2013.
 ∴  Les anges aquatiques. Translated by Frédéric Fourreau. Paris: Seuil, 2014.
 ∴  Water Angels. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2015.
 ∴  Englar vatnsins. Translated by Jón Þ. Þór. Reykjavík: Ugla, 2017.

Vindsjälar. Stockholm: Forum, 2013.
 ∴  Duchy wiatru. Translated by Anna Krochmal & Robert Kedzierski. Poznan: Rebis, 2015.
 ∴  Souls of Air. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2016.

Jordstorm. Stockholm: Forum, 2014.
 ∴  Ziemna burza. Translated by Anna Krochmal & Robert Kedzierski. Poznan: Rebis, 2016.
 ∴  Earth Storm. Translated by Neil Smith. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2018.

Eldjägarna. Stockholm: Forum, 2015.
 ∴  Łowcy ognia. Translated by Anna Krochmal & Robert Kedzierski. Poznan: Rebis, 2017.

Djävulsdoften. Stockholm: Forum, 2016.
 ∴  Zapach diabła. Translated by Anna Krochmal & Robert Kedzierski. Poznan: Rebis, 2017.

Bödelskyssen. Stockholm: Forum, 2017.

Midvinterblod, which I read in Max Stadler & Lucile Clauss's French translation Hiver, is pretty much a dead-standard Scandinavian police procedural. Our hero is a detective inspector, nearing middle-age, depressed, alcoholic, impulsive – and with an alienated teenage daughter. It's something of a wrinkle that this successor to Wallander and Erlendur should be a woman, Malin Fors, but that's not enough of a wrinkle to surprise 21st-century readers familiar with female investigators like Ann Lindell and Louise Rick.

The crime is a midwinter bludgeoning of an obese, mentally-challenged man – who is then hung naked in a tree to freeze solid. The killing shows elements of ritual sacrifice. Malin Fors, her partner Zeke Martinsson, and a team of other investigators pursue questioning among the wacko Norse-nature-god fringe of the community of Linköping. But there are other angles to the inquiry. Some tennage punks had been making the victim's life miserable. And the one social worker who seemed to care about him had been viciously raped years earlier in the same part of the woods. She now leads a closed-in life in an institution, but her family, the brutal, tribal Murvalls, are preternaturally ugly customers. Could the Murvall brothers have killed Bengt Andersson to avenge the rape of their sister? Or even the imagined rape of their sister?

Andersson, the Murvalls, the young punks, and many another character in Hiver are what they are because people neglected them, or much worse, when they were children. "On ne naît pas méchant," thinks Malin at one point, "nobody is born bad" (442). We are in standard 20th-century liberal territory here: all social and psychological ills are failures of the family.

Of course, Sweden is famous for being a national family. The grotesque Murvalls are a mockery of the Swedish welfare state. I cannot quite tell whether author Mons Kallentoft is using that mockery just for dramatic heightening, or whether he means actively to critique Swedish institutions. Certainly most of the functionaries that he represents – aside from the crusading, selfless police – are uncaring clockwatchers. Maria Murvall, the compassionate social worker, has been destroyed for her pains. Something is rotten in the state of Sweden, and whether that's the fault of the Swedish state may depend on the beholder, or on nuances that don't reach an American reader of a French translation.

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