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2384 Overview: A Pasta Paradigm

Sentences and Speech Acts
Canonical Sentence Types
Roles of Subordinate Clauses
Verb Phrases
Noun Phrases
Prepositional Phrases
Conversational Implicature
Morphology
Phonology



Sentences and Speech Acts

Five Sentence Functions

  1. Declaratives: I love pasta.
  2. Closed Questions: Do you like pasta?
  3. Open Questions: What kinds of pasta do you like?
  4. Imperatives: Finish your spaghetti!
  5. Exclamations: What great manicotti!

Five Speech Acts

  1. Assertives: Macaroni is easy to cook.
  2. Directives: Get me two pounds of tagliatelle.
  3. Expressives: Thanks so much for making spaghetti for me!
  4. Commissives: I promise I'll fix mac & cheese if you finish your homework.
  5. Declarations: I hereby name you Pasta Chef of the Month.

Canonical Sentence Types

Five Canonical Declarative Sentence Types

  1. Intransitive: On Wednesdays, I bake.
  2. Transitive: On Wednesdays, I bake penne.
  3. Ditransitive: I served Susan some penne.
  4. Subject-Complement: This baked ziti is filling.
  5. Object-Complement: Chuck's pasta primavera makes me happy.

Roles of Subordinate Clauses

Verb Phrases

Noun Phrases


Mix & match: "The best pasta dishes that you cook"; "My favorite fresh pasta of all"

Prepositional Phrases

Form: P + Complement (NP, -ing clause, wh- clause: "for dinner," "for eating pasta," "for when we have company")
Roles of PPs"

Conversational Implicature (H.P. Grice)

Utterances ought to be To violate all four in four sentences: "You're looking wide awake this morning. Huh! Guess you were up all night grading papers. If that's what they're calling it these days."

Morphology

Phonology (click on link for webpage)

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