ENGL 3300-002

Tim Morris

Baseball and Writing Spring 2009

1900-2020 MW 302 Preston Hall

office hours: 211 Carlisle Hall 0900-1200 MTWRF

tmorris at uta dot edu

office phone: 817.272.2739

office mailbox 203 Carlisle Hall

mailing address Box 19035, UTA 76019

to the schedule of readings and assignments

required texts: The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop. by Robert Coover; Sort of Gone by Sarah Freligh; The Celebrant: A Novel by Eric Rolfe Greenberg ; Take Me Out by Richard Greenberg; In Praise of Athletic Beauty by Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht; The Natural by Bernard Malamud; Jackie Robinson: A Biography by Arnold Rampersad; Fences by August Wilson

syllabus: This syllabus may be updated as the semester goes on. I may post updated versions that indicate readings, discussion plans, and reference materials. However, every component of your grade is shown here at the beginning. If you're looking at this on paper, please refer to the date and time of printing (at the bottom of each page) to see when the version you are holding was printed. For continuous updates look on line at http://www.uta.edu/english/tim/courses/3300s09/3300main.html

course description: This course presents some major texts in American baseball literature, and encourages students to reflect on the theoretical connections between sport, art, and verbal discourse.

course objectives: Students who successfully complete this course will have written several academic papers comparing primary and secondary texts in sport studies, and completed a collaborative cultural-studies project on the significance of Jackie Robinson in American culture.

assignments: Preconceptions paper, seven short papers, seminar presentation, term paper.

grading: The grading system uses a 1,000-point basis. Each of the seven short papers is worth 100 points. The seminar presentation is worth 50, as is the short "preconceptions paper." The term paper is worth 150 points. 50 points are assigned for attendance and class participation. You will earn those 50 points by missing no more than three class meetings during the semester, and by making some contribution to discussions.

All work must be submitted in MLA style.

academic dishonesty policy: It is the philosophy of The University of Texas at Arlington that academic dishonesty is a completely unacceptable mode of conduct and will not be tolerated in any form. All persons involved in academic dishonesty will be disciplined in accordance with University regulations and procedures. Discipline may include suspension or expulsion from the University. "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts." [Regents' Rules and Regulations, Part One, Chapter Vi, Section 3, Subsection 3.2, Subdivision 3.22]

disability policy: The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of federal equal opportunity legislation; reference Public Law 93112--The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. With the passage of new federal legislation entitled Americans with Disabilities Act - (ADA), pursuant to section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, there is renewed focus on providing this population with the same opportunities enjoyed by all citizens. As a faculty member, I am required by law to provide "reasonable accommodation" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Student responsibility primarily rests with informing faculty at the beginning of the semester and in providing authorized documentation through designated administrative channels.

Writing Center: The Writing Center, Room 411 in the Central Library, will assist you with any writing assignment while you are a student at UT-Arlington. During Fall 2008, the Writing Centerís hours are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday; and 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. You may schedule appointments online by following directions available at www.uta.edu/owl/appointments, by calling 817 272-2601, or by visiting the Writing Center. If you come to the Writing Center without an appointment, you will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis as tutors become available. Writing Center tutors are carefully chosen and trained, and they can assist you with any aspect of your writing, from understanding an assignment to revising an early draft to polishing a final draft. However, the Writing Center is not an editing service; tutors will not correct your grammar or rewrite your assignment for you, but they will help you learn to solve your grammatical and organizational problems. I encourage each of you to use the Writing Center.

student success: The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success. They include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs. Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at 817-272-6107 for more information and appropriate referrals.

Library: The English Department librarian is Rafia Mirza. Use the link to her profile to access departmental research guides and other reference services, and to contact Ms. Mirza if needed.

schedule of assignments and readings:

some selected web resources:

Guide to Baseball Fiction

You can look it up: Baseball-Reference

SABR's Biography Project

Baseball Library

Clem's Baseball Stadiums

Wed 21 Jan: introductions, syllabus, exigence for the course

Mon 26 Jan: preconceptions papers due; class discussion. Bring a short (3-5 pp.) paper discussing your attitudes toward and experiences with sport, writing, and baseball in particular.

Wed 28 Jan: No class tonight; UTA closed for ice

Mon 2 Feb: lecture: sport, presence, "plays"; baseball as a game

Wed 4 Feb: lecture: baseball as a business; its history

Mon 9 Feb: short paper due on Gumbrecht, In Praise of Athletic Beauty. Comment on moments in sport that exemplify for you some of Gumbrecht's principles. Critique his ideas where you find it necessary to do so, in every sense of the word "critique." 3-5 pp.

Wed 11 Feb: continue discussion of Gumbrecht

Mon 16 Feb: lecture: baseball as writing

Wed 18 Feb: some baseball poems

Mon 23 Feb: short paper due on Malamud, The Natural. Each short paper assignment from now forward is basically the same: connect the text for this week with one of the texts we've read before (this week, that means connecting Malamud with Gumbrecht, perforce). Make specific, detailed connections with quotations and citations from the texts. Show how each text illuminates the other. 3-5 pp.

Wed 25 Feb: continue discussion of Malamud

Mon 2 March: short paper due on E. Greenberg, The Celebrant. Each short paper assignment from now forward is basically the same: connect the text for this week with one of the texts we've read before (this week, that means connecting The Celebrant with either Malamud or Gumbrecht, and so forth). Make specific, detailed connections with quotations and citations from the texts. Show how each text illuminates the other. 3-5 pp.

Wed 4 March: continue discussion of The Celebrant

Mon 9 March: lecture: Jackie Robinson, race, and identity in baseball

Wed 11 March: discuss Rampersad, Jackie Robinson

Mon 23 March: short paper due on Coover, The Universal Baseball Association. Each short paper assignment from now forward is basically the same: connect the text for this week with one of the texts we've read before (Rampersad's Jackie Robinson is available for this purpose even though there's no short paper assignment on it). Make specific, detailed connections with quotations and citations from the texts. Show how each text illuminates the other. 3-5 pp.

Wed 25 March: continue discussion of Coover

Mon 30 March: short paper due on Wilson, Fences. Each short paper assignment from now forward is basically the same: connect the text for this week with one of the texts we've read before. Make specific, detailed connections with quotations and citations from the texts. Show how each text illuminates the other. 3-5 pp.

Wed 1 April: continue discussion of Wilson

Mon 6 April: short paper due on R. Greenberg, Take Me Out. Each short paper assignment from now forward is basically the same: connect the text for this week with one of the texts we've read before. Make specific, detailed connections with quotations and citations from the texts. Show how each text illuminates the other. 3-5 pp.

Wed 8 April: continue discussion of Take Me Out

Mon 13 April: short paper due on Freligh, Sort of Gone. Each short paper assignment from now forward is basically the same: connect the text for this week with one of the texts we've read before. Make specific, detailed connections with quotations and citations from the texts. Show how each text illuminates the other. 3-5 pp.

Wed 15 April: open date

Mon 20 April: open date

Wed 22 April: seminar presentations:
Tim Steggall, The Story of Jackie Robinson
Natasha Turner, Stealing Home (Burleigh)
Shearon Jones, Stealing Home (Denenberg)
Danielle Ngwira, Jackie's Bat

Mon 27 Apr: seminar presentations:
Patti Wall, Jackie & Me
Liliann Faz, Thank You, Jackie Robinson
Shericia Woods, In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson
Jordan Rivera, I Never Had It Made

Wed 29 Apr: seminar presentations:
Shannon Lang, Double Play
Drew Morris, Blackout
Robert Matson, The Plot to Kill Jackie Robinson
Mark Draz, Mr Rickey Calls a Meeting

Mon 4 May: open date

Wed 6 May: term papers due; course evaluations

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