LING 4301/5320: Phonological Theory 1

Course Syllabus and Policies

Fall 2008

 

Instructor:

Colleen Fitzgerald

Office:

Hammond Hall 403

Phone:

817-272-3133

Office Hours:

Tuesdays 2 pm – 5 pm or by appointment

Email:

cmfitz AT uta DOT edu

Web page:

http://ling.uta.edu/~colleen

Class Meeting:

Trimble Hall 216 TR 12:30 – 1:50 pm

 

Prerequisites:  LING 3330 or permission of the instructor

 

Required Text:

Kenstowicz, Michael.  Phonology in Generative Grammar.  Cambridge, Mass.:  Basil Blackwell [K]

Hayes, Bruce.  1995.  Metrical Stress Theory.  The University of Chicago Press. [H; selected chapters to be put on reserve]

Course Description: LING 4301/5320 begins the study of the principles that govern sound systems in human languages.  Students will work with sound patterns from a wide variety of the worldŐs languages.  Course readings will introduce the fundamentals of the different areas of phonological phenomena, and course assignments will require hands-on application of the descriptive and theoretical tools in working with sound pattern data.  Lectures will further develop this approach of description, analysis, and argumentation for phonological data.

Course Objectives:  The goal of LING 4301/5320 is to transition from problem-solving into thinking about phonology by learning how to read and critique phonological analyses and how to argue for one solution over another.  As the semester progresses, students will be expected to engage higher-level questions about what phonological models are expected to explain and to talk about data in an increasingly sophisticated and prose-based manner.

Student Learning Objectives:

A student who successfully completes LING 4301/5320 should be able to:  

o   Develop and refine skills in phonological analysis and in writing up this analysis.

o   Recognize and formulate phonological arguments, as well as express them in prose.

o   Become familiar with the phonological patterns that are possible cross-linguistically.

o   Analyze phonological data using theoretical frameworks.

o   Do independent research in phonology, at least at a beginning level.

 

 

 

Course Requirements:

Undergraduates

Graduates

1.  Homework (50%) (10 assignments, not all problems; lowest grade dropped and highest grade doubled if all are completed; undergraduates do fewer problems)

1.  Homework (50%) (10 assignments, all problems; lowest grade dropped and highest grade doubled if all are completed; grad students do all problems)

Half of the homework assignments must be turned in as essays, while the remaining half do not.

Half of the homework assignments must be turned in as essays, while the remaining half do not.

2.  Attendance and Participation (10%): Students must attend course regularly and make up all material and get lecture notes from a classmate on the rare occasion class is missed. Complete reading and "exercises" is a part of participation grades.

2.  Attendance and Participation (10%) Students must attend course regularly and make up all material and get lecture notes from a classmate on the rare occasion class is missed. Complete reading and "exercises" is a part of participation grades.

3.  Project (40%):  max 10 pp

3. Project (40%):  max 15 pages

Project parts 1-4 count for 5% of the overall grade for this assignment, receiving full credit if they are turned in on time and complete; project part 5 carries the remaining 80% of this assignmentŐs grade, based on the criteria on the project sheet.

*Undergraduates have a shorter length requirement.

Project parts 1-4 count for 5% of the overall grade for this assignment, receiving full credit if they are turned in on time and complete; project part 5 carries the remaining 80% of this assignmentŐs grade, based on the criteria on the project sheet.

*Graduates have a longer length requirement.

 

The grades for each component will be determined as follows:

 

A-

90-92 %

B-

80-82 %                 

C-

70-72

D-

60-62%

F

59 or lower

A

93-96 %

B

83-86 %   

C

73-76

D

63-66

 

 

A+

97-100 %   

B+

87-89      

C+

77-79

D+

67-69

 

 

 

 

Assignments must be turned in on time in order to receive credit, and no exceptions will be made for late assignments.  There will be no extra credit assignments.

 

Date

Topic

Reading Due

Assignment Due

WEEK 1

 

 

 

8/26

Course Overview

 

 

8/28

The Sound of Speech

K Intro,1

 

WEEK 2

 

 

 

9/2

ContŐd

 

 

9/4

Generative Phonology – Rules and representations

K 2

HW 1

WEEK 3

 

 

 

9/9

cont'd

 

 

9/11

Phonological Alternations and Derivations

K 3

HW 2

WEEK4

 

 

 

9/16

cont'd

 

Project 1

9/18

ContŐd

Start K 4

 

WEEK 5

 

 

 

9/23

Features

K 4

HW 3

9/25

ContŐd

 

 

WEEK 6

 

 

 

9/30

Lexical Phonology

K 5

HW 4

10/2

ContŐd

 

Project 2

WEEK 7

 

 

 

10/7

Syllables

K 6

HW 5

10/9

Guest lecture

 

 

WEEK 8

 

 

 

10/14

Continue with syllables

 

Project 3

10/16

Autosegmental Phonology

K 7

 

WEEK 9

 

 

 

10/21

cont'd

 

HW 6

10/23

cont'd

 

 

WEEK 10

 

 

 

10/28

The Phonological Skeleton

K 8

HW 7

10/30

Cont'd

 

 

10/31

NOTE:  last day to drop

 

 

WEEK 11

 

 

 

11/4

ContŐd

 

HW 8

11/6

Feature Geometry, Underspecification and Constraints

K 9

 

WEEK 12

 

 

 

11/11

cont'd

 

Project 4

11/13

Stress

H 1-2

 

WEEK 13

 

 

 

11/18

Continued

H 3-4

HW 9

11/20

Continued

 

 

WEEK 14

 

 

 

11/25

Prosodic Morphology

K 11

HW 10

11/27

NO CLASS

 

 

WEEK 15

 

 

 

12/2

ContŐd

 

 

12/4

Overview of Phonology in the 21st Century

 

 

 

 

 

 

12/11

Final exam date – no final exam, but final project (your paper) is due by 1:30 pm of this date

 

Project 5

 

Final Review Week:  A period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the course syllabus. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week.

 

Americans With Disabilities Act: The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of federal equal opportunity legislation (Public Law 93112, The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended). With the passage of new federal legislation entitled the "Americans With Disabilities Act" (ADA), pursuant to section 504 of The Rehabilitation Act, there is renewed focus on providing this population with the same opportunities enjoyed by all citizens.

 

All members of the UTA faculty are required by law to provide "reasonable accommodation" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. As a student, your responsibility rests with informing the instructor at the beginning of the semester (you must inform me in writing (e-mail is fine) no later than Tuesday, September 9, 2008) and in providing authorized documentation through designated administrative channels; for more information, contact UTA's Office of Students with Disabilities (located in the Lower Level of University Center).

 

According to Department of Linguistics and TESOL policy, "unofficial" or "informal" requests for accommodations (i.e., those not recorded by the Office of Students with Disabilities) cannot be honored.

 

Academic Dishonesty: At The University of Texas at Arlington, academic dishonesty is a completely unacceptable mode of conduct and will not be tolerated in any form. Students involved in academic dishonesty will be disciplined in accordance with University regulations and procedures. Discipline may include suspension or expulsion from UTA.

 

According the UT System Regents' Rules and Regulations, "Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts" (Part One, Chapter VI, Section 3, Subsection 3.2, Subdivision 3.22).

 

While the Department of Linguistics and TESOL hopes to foster a sense of community in which students can enhance their educational experience by conferring with each other about the lectures, readings, and assignments, all work submitted must be the product of each student's own effort. Students are expected to know and honor the standards of academic integrity followed by American universities; ignorance of these standards is not an excuse for committing an act of academic dishonesty (including plagiarism). If you have questions, please speak with your instructor, your academic advisor, or the department chair.

 

Student Support Services Available: The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success. These programs include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs. Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at 817-272-6107 for information and referrals.

 

Enrolling in / Withdrawing from this Course: Students are responsible for making all decisions regarding their enrollment status in UTA courses. Should you decide to withdraw from this course, you must either (1) drop via the internet through the MyMav system or (2) complete an official "add/drop" and file it in the Linguistics and TESOL department office. Any student who stops attending class and/or fails to complete assigned work will not be "automatically" dropped; in such cases, unless you officially withdraw, you will receive a grade of F. (Note: Students enrolled in graduate courses may not "replace" a grade; all grades are permanent.)

 

A student dropping his/her last (only) course cannot withdraw as above. Rather, s/he must go in person to the UTA Registrar's Office (Davis Hall, First Floor) and complete a request to resign from the university.

 

Auditors: The Department of Linguistics and TESOL has a "no audit" policy. Students attending LING classes must be officially enrolled in those courses. Exception: Students who have already fulfilled a degree requirements and would like to sit in on a comparable course to prepare for their comprehensive / diagnostic examination may do so (with the permission of the professor).

 

Gifts to Faculty: The Department of Linguistics and TESOL has a strict "no gift" policy: instructors may not accept gifts of any kind from students, including meals, food, or flowers. All linguistics instructors have been instructed to refuse gifts. Students can avoid placing their instructors in an awkward position by not offering them any gifts. Students wishing to honor their professors may make a contribution to the LING-TESOL Scholarship Fund; visit the department office (Hammond Hall 403) and ask for a "Gift Giving Guide."