HISTORY 1311
THE UNITED STATES: 1607-1865

Sections 2 & 3
FALL---2012 

      MWF 9-9:50am  Section 2 
108UH
MWF 10-10:50am Section 3
115UH


Professor Maizlish -- UH 313

Open Office Hours: MWF 6:50am-7:50am (UH 313)

Appointment Office Hours: MWF 11am-5pm  (Basement of the Main Library)

                                Appointments Must Be Made At Least 24 Hours In Advance
                                                                   
maizlish@uta.edu

               Students are urged, strongly urged, to take advantage of appointment office hours and arrange times to
               meet that are convenient for them.
 

               My goal in establishing appointment hours is to make myself as accessible to students as possible by
               allowing them to fit meetings with me into their own schedules.

               I am now available to meet with students 7 hours-a-day (MWF), 21 hours-a-week.

               For Office Hour Updates See: http://www.uta.edu/faculty/maizlish/office%20hours.htm
 

Phone: Due to budgetary constraints history faculty no longer have telephones in their offices. 
             Please rely on e-mail for contact.            

E-Mail: maizlish@uta.edu

Review Sessions
              Fridays, 12noon-1pm, Room  11 UH

Graduate Teaching Assistants
                                         Section 2
(MWF 9-9:50am)
                                   Kristen Burton                                     
                                   Office: 318 UH                                     
                                   Office Hours: 8-9am MWF                 
                                                 and by appointment                    
                                   Email: kristen.burton@mavs.uta.edu

                                              Section 3
(MWF 10-10:50am)
                                   Christopher Malmberg
                                   Office: 315 UH
                                   Office Hours: 12-1pm Monday; 1-3pm Wednesday
                                              and by appointment
                                    Email: christopher.malmberg@mavs.uta.edu   
                

Useful Link: [University of Texas at Arlington Libraries]

THE UNITED STATES: 1607-1865

Readings
Internet Use
Course Outline
Course Requirements
Important Information
Optional Graphics
Past Guides
Study Guide

Readings

Required Readings:
Interactive Links
Frederick Douglass, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Optional Readings:
Interactive Links
Cantor, How To Study History
James W. Davidson, ed. Nation of Nations (Numbers indicated below refer to relevant chapters)

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INTERNET USE

1)  ALL of the required readings and ALL of the optional readings, except for Davidson and Cantor, 
     may be accessed through internet links.

2) The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass can be read on the internet, but
    students may wish to purchase this book rather than read this document on the web.

3)  Internet links can be found on the course web page below.  

4) Computer problems or a down system WILL NOT be an acceptable excuse for missed assignments
    or a failure to be ready for examinations.

               BE PREPARED!!!           PLAN AHEAD!!! 

    DO NOT leave your reading to the last moment, or, if you do, MAKE SURE to have back-up computer access available.

5) Please remember that the professor cannot accept assignments or give out grades over the internet.

6) See below, Important Information #14, for a list of free campus computer access sites.

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Course Outline

WEEK

 

DATE TOPIC REQUIRED
READING
OPTIONAL READING
Week I Aug. 24 Introduction -------------- 1.Cantor
2.Reading, Writing, and Researching for History: A College Student's Guide

Week II
Aug. 27

The European & African, Roots of 
the Great Migration

-----------------

Davidson, 1

Aug. 29
 
The Economic and Religious Motivation for the Great Migration The Mayflower Compact Davidson, 1-3
Aug. 31 The Puritan Community & Its Decline  1.A Model of Christian Charity
2.A Witchcraft Indictment (Indictment v. Mary Bradbury, No. 1.) 
3.An Accused Witch's Denial (Answer of Mary Bradbury)
4.An Accused Witch's
Confession
 (Confession from Prison of William Barker, Sr.) 
Davidson, 1-3
Cotton Mather's "Memorable Providences"
Week III Sept. 3 ----NO CLASS ------ ----LABOR DAY---- ----------------
Sept. 5 The Southern Colonies Indentured Servants Davidson, 2 & 4
Sept. 7 The Origins of American Slavery 1.William Byrd's Diary
2.Capture
3. The Middle Passage
4. Falconbridge's Description of the Middle Passage
5. Slave Sale Broadside (1774)
Davidson, 2 & 4

Week IV Sept. 10 EXAMINATION #1 Lectures & Required Readings:
Aug. 27-Sept. 7

Sept. 12 Empire Relations:
1663-1763
Map of the Colonies (1775) Davidson, 4
Sept. 14 America on the Eve of Revolution Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography 
(Chapter 8, starting with: "Continuation of the Account of my Life . . .")
Davidson, 4
Crevecoeur's "What is an American"

   
Week V Sept. 17 ----NO CLASS ---  -------------- ------------
Sept. 19 The American Revolution: The First Confrontation Stamp Act Congress Resolutions Davidson, 5
Sept. 21 The Meaning of the American Revolution  1.The Resolves of the 1st 
Continental Congress
2.The Declaration of 
Independence
Davidson, 5 & 6
1.Pennsylvania's Act of Gradual Abolition 
2.Dunmore's Proclamation Offering Freedom
3.Thomas Paine's Common 
Sense

Week VI Sept. 24 The Confederation Map of the United States (1790) Davidson, 7
1.The Articles of Confederation
2.The Northwest Ordinance
Sept. 26 ----NO CLASS ---  -------------- ------------
Sept. 28 The Constitution 1.The Constitution
(preamble)
2.Federalist #10
3.George Washington on Slavery
Davidson, 7
1.The Debates of the
Constitutional 
Convention
2.The Constitution
Ratification Debate
3.The Federalist 
Papers

Week VII Oct. 1 EXAMINATION #2 Lectures & Required Readings:
Sept. 12-28
------------
Oct. 3 The Origins of the First Party System 1.The Sedition Act
2.Kentucky Resolutions of 1798
(Resolves 1, 2, & 3)
Davidson, 8 1.Washington's Proclamation 
of Neutrality
2.Washington's Farewell Address
Oct. 5 The Election of 1800 Thomas Jefferson's 1st Inaugural Address Davidson, 8 & 9

Week VIII Oct. 8 The War of 1812 1.President Madison's War Message
2. The Hunters of Kentucky
3. Johnny Horton: Battle of New Orleans
Davidson, 9
The Hartford Convention
Resolutions
Oct. 10 The New Nationalism &
The Market Economy
Erie Canal (painting) Davidson, 9&10
Oct. 12 Jacksonian Democracy ---------------- Davidson, 11
Andrew Jackson's Bank Veto

Week IX Oct. 15 The Whig Opposition and the Second American Party System The Log Cabin Campaign Davidson, 11
Henry Clay Responds to the Bank Veto
Oct. 17 Manifest Destiny & Indian Removal 1.Louisiana Purchase Map
2.Andrew Jackson Supports Removal
3.A Cherokee Letter of  Protest
4.Trail of Tears Map
Davidson, 11
Oct. 19 EXAMINATION #3 Lectures and Required Readings: Oct. 3-17

---------------
Week X Oct. 22 A Woman's Place Seneca Falls Declaration Davidson, 12
Oct. 24 The Age of Reform ------------- Davidson, 12

Oct. 26 Text: John Brown I
Film: John Brown I
------------- --------------

Week XI Oct. 29 Slavery Attacked: Abolitionism William Lloyd Garrison Davidson, 12
Constitution of the American Antislavery Society, 1833
Oct. 31 The Identity of the Old South:
The Peculiar Institution


LAST DAY TO
Douglass, ALL


DROP
Davidson, 13

Nov. 2

The Slaves

1.Douglass, ALL
2.Runaway Reward Notice (1835)

Davidson, 13
1.Slave Narratives-- UNC
2.David Walker's Appeal, 1829
3. Frederick Douglass: "The Meaning of July 4th",1852

Week XII
Nov. 5  The Slaveholders

 

REMEMBER 

1.Douglass, ALL
2.John C. Calhoun on Slavery  

MAKE-UP DAY DEC. 5

Davidson, 13
George Fitzhugh on Slavery

Nov. 7

EXAMINATION #4 Lectures and Required Readings: Oct. 22-Nov. 5 --------------

Nov. 9

Text: John Brown II
Film: John Brown II
--------------- ------------------

Week XIII Nov. 12 Slavery Defended:
The Missouri Crisis
Map of the Missouri Compromise Davidson, 10
Nov. 14 Slavery Defended:
Nullification Crisis

JUST 3 WEEKS TO MAKE-UP DAY DEC. 5th
1.South Carolina's Ordinance 
of Nullification
2.Andrew Jackson's  
Proclamation on
Nullification
 (From "The Defects of the Confederation" through "I consider then;" from "On such expositions" through "because it would be a solecism.")
Davidson, 11
Nov. 16

The Annexation of Texas and the War against Mexico

Map of the Texas Republic

Davidson, 14
1.The Inaugural Address of
James K. Polk
2.The Annexation of Texas


Week XIV Nov. 19 The Slavery Extension Issue and the Election of 1848 The Wilmot Proviso Davidson, 14
Nov. 21 NO CLASS--THANKSGIVING    


Nov. 23 NO CLASS--THANKSGIVING  

Week XV Nov. 26 Compromise and Chaos 1.Map of  the 
Compromise of 1850
2.John C. Calhoun on the Compromise of 1850
3.The Crisis of 1850 (cartoon)
Davidson, 14
The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850


Nov. 28
 

The Birth of the Republican Party

JUST 1 WEEK TO- --MAKE-UP DAY--DEC. 5th  11UH

 



1.
The Republican Platform of 1856
2.Charles Sumner's Canning, (painting)


Davidson, 15
1.The 
Kansas-Nebraska 
Act
2.Lincoln on 
Kansas-Nebraska
3.Charles Sumner on Kansas
Nov. 30
Road to Disunion: Dred Scott &
Lecompton
-------------

 

Davidson, 15
1.The Dred Scott 
Decision
2.Lincoln's House Divided Speech
3.The Irrepressible Conflict, William Seward, 1858 


Week XVI Dec. 3 John Brown's Raid & The Election of Abraham Lincoln 1.John Brown in Court
2.The Republican Platform of 1860
Davidson, 15

Dec. 5 The Southern Insurrection & The War for the Union








MAKE-UP ALL EXAMS
-
*--*-TODAY-*--*-
1PM-6PM!! 11UH
1.Slavery Expansion, Charleston Mercury, Feb. 28, 1860
2.The Texas Ordinance of   Secession
3.Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address
Davidson, 151.The Democratic 
Platform of 1860 
(Douglass faction)
2.The Democratic 
Platform of 1860 
(Breckinridge 
faction)
3.N.Y. Legislature on Secession, Jan., 1861
4.Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Address
5.Abraham Lincoln's Abraham First Inauguration (photograph)
6.Songs of the Civil War

FINAL EXAMINATION --- 9AM   SECTION 2:
WEDNESDAY---DECEMBER  12---8AM-10:30AM 108UH


FINAL EXAMINATION --- 10AM  SECTION 3:
MONDAY --- DECEMBER 10---- 8AM-10:30AM 115UH

              
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Course Requirements

ATTENDANCE

Regular attendance is STRONGLY recommended. Though regular attendance does not guarantee success in the class, STUDENTS CANNOT DO WELL WITHOUT ATTENDING EVERY LECTURE. Students who miss a class meeting should get notes for the class they miss from a fellow student. If they have any questions about the notes they receive, they should feel free to ask for clarification from either the professor or teaching assistant. Neither teaching assistants or the professor can give out class notes.

CLASS NOTES, LECTURE OUTLINES, AND POWERPOINT SHOWS ARE NOT POSTED ON THE WEB OR ON "BLACKBOARD."

EXAMINATIONS


Four examinations will be given during the semester. They will each consist of 33 multiple choice questions and will cover the lectures and the required reading. Each examination will test knowledge of the material presented in the period immediately preceding the date of the exam.

IN ORDER TO PASS THE CLASS, STUDENTS MUST TAKE EACH OF THE EXAMINATIONS IF THEY PRESENT A VALID EXCUSE FOR MISSING AN EXAMINATION, THEY MUST MAKE IT UP BY TAKING A "MAKE-UP" EXAM.  "MAKE-UP" EXAMINATIONS WILL BE GIVEN ON FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5TH FROM 1PM TO 6PM IN ROOM 11UH THIS IS THE ONLY TIME EXAMINATIONS CAN BE MADE UP.  STUDENTS WHO MISS EXAMINATIONS MUST PLAN TO TAKE "MAKE-UPS" AT THIS TIME.  MAKE-UP EXAMINATIONS WILL CONSIST OF ESSAY QUESTIONS.  THEY WILL ONLY BE GIVEN TO STUDENTS WHO MISS EXAMS.

EXAMINATION GRADES ARE FINAL. EXAMINATIONS CANNOT BE RETAKEN, DROPED, OR "MADE-UP."

INCOMPLETES ARE NOT GIVEN IN THIS CLASS.

 

FINAL EXAMINATION


There will be a final examination. It will cover the lectures and the required reading since the last examination and will consist of 33 multiple choice questions. Questions for the final examination will be drawn from areas listed in a study guide that will be placed on the web one week before the final examination takes place.

IN ORDER TO PASS THE CLASS, STUDENTS MUST TAKE THE FINAL EXAMINATION.

INCOMPLETES ARE NOT GIVEN IN THIS CLASS. 

 

STUDY GUIDE

 

Questions for the examinations, and for the final examination, will be drawn from areas listed in a study guide found on the course web page. Areas covered in each lecture will be entered in the study guide after each lecture takes place, ususally a few hours after the lecture is given. Students may consult the sutdy guide after the lecture to make sure that their notes to that day's lecture cover each area listed and they may use the sutdy guide to prepare for the examinations and for the final examination.

 

GRADING


THE FOUR EXAMINATIONS AND THE FINAL EXAMINATION ARE REQUIRED.  STUDENTS WHO DO NOT COMPLETE ALL OF THESE REQUIREMENTS WILL NOT PASS THE CLASS. 

INCOMPLETES ARE NOT GIVEN IN THIS CLASS.

N0 EXTRA CREDIT IS GIVEN IN THIS CLASS. Students are urged to devote all of their class work time to the lectures, the required readings, and preparation for the exams.

The course grade will be computed as follows:

Four examinations - 20% each = 80%
Final examination = 20%

--------------------------------------------------------

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IMPORTANT  INFORMATION:

1) Course Description: 

An introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States prior to 1865. This course is designed to help students understand and evaluate their society, comprehend the historical experience, and further develop reading and writing competencies and critical skills. The main emphasis of this course is on race relations, sectional conflict, and the political and economic development of the new nation.  This course makes extensive use of the internet.  All required assignments and most optional assignments are web-based.  Internet links give students direct access to a vast collection of required and optional primary source materials in both graphic and text form.

2) Student Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to describe, identify, and explain the major trends and events in the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States prior to 1865.

3) Students are encouraged to contact the professor whenever they have questions either during office hours (open and appointment) or by email, however, email attachments cannot be opened. Due to budgetary constraints history faculty no longer have telephones in their offices.

4) Grades cannot be given out or discussed over the internet and they will not be posted on "Blackboard." However, students are welcome to ask the professor or teaching assistant(s) before or after class, or during office hours, for their grades or their current class average. To find out the final exam grade, students may leave a stamped, self-addressed envelope or postcard with the GTAs at the final exam or in the professor's mail box in the History Department office, 202UH. Course grades can be discussed with the professor at the start of the following semester.

5) PLEASE TURN OFF ALL CELL PHONES AND SET ALL BEEPERS TO SILENT MODE WHILE IN CLASS. TEXT MESSAGING IS NOT ALLOWED DURING THE CLASS PERIOD OR DURING EXAMINATIONS.  
CELL PHONES MAY NOT BE VISIBLE DURING CLASS TIME OR DURING EXAMINATIONS.
THEY SHOULD BE SECRETED IN A PLACE WHERE THEY CANNOT BE SEEN, TOUCHED, OR HEARD
.

THE USE OF CAMERAS IN THE CLASSROOM IS ALSO STRICTLY PROHIBITED. THE TAKING OF PHOTGRAPHS OR SCREEN SHOTS IS NOT ALLOWED.

6) If you wish to use a tape recorder, please first see the professor to gain approval . 

7) LAPTOP COMPUTER USE OR THE USE OF I-PADS OR OTHER SUCH DEVICES IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

8) If you wish to audit the class, please first see the professor.

9) STUDENTS ARE URGED TO KEEP ALL OF THEIR EXAMINATIONS UNTIL COURSE GRADES ARE RECEIVED FROM THE REGISTRAR.  Clerical errors cannot be identified and corrected without the evidence provided by these test papers.

10) Students who come to class on time should keep the back rows of the classroom empty. Students who come in late or need to leave early should sit in the back rows.

11) Americans with Disabilities Act: The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of all federal equal opportunity legislation, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). All instructors at UT Arlington are required by law to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Any student requiring an accommodation for this course must provide the instructor with official documentation in the form of a letter certified by the staff in the Office for Students with Disabilities, University Hall 102. Only those students who have officially documented a need for an accommodation will have their request honored. Information regarding diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining disability-based academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability or by calling the Office for Students with Disabilities at (817) 272-3364.

12) Academic Integrity: At UT Arlington, academic dishonesty is completely unacceptable and will not be tolerated in any form, including (but not limited to) "cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts" (UT System Regents' Rule 50101, ยง2.2).

All students enrolled in this course are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code: 

I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington's tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.


I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.

Suspected violations of the university's academic integrity standards (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student's suspension or expulsion from the University.

13) Student Support Services:  UT Arlington provides a variety of resources and programs designed to help students develop academic skills, deal with personal situations, and better understand concepts and information related to their courses. Resources include tutoring, major-based learning centers, developmental education, advising and mentoring, personal counseling, and federally funded programs. For individualized referrals, students may contact the Maverick Resource Hotline by calling 817-272-6107, sending a message to resources@uta.edu, or visiting www.uta.edu/resources. The History Department web site also includes links to many useful sources aimed at assisting you academically. You will find tips on how to read a history book, how to take notes from books and lectures, how to write a research paper, and exam preparation. Go to: Student Guides to the Study of History.

14) Free UT Arlington Campus Computer Access:

Ransom Hall - 1st Floor
University Hall - Basement
Central Library  

15) Electronic Communication:  UT Arlington has adopted MavMail as its official means to communicate with students about important deadlines and events, as well as to transact university-related business regarding financial aid, tuition, grades, graduation, etc. All students are assigned a MavMail account and are responsible for checking the inbox regularly. There is no additional charge to students for using this account, which remains active even after graduation. Information about activating and using MavMail is available at http://www.uta.edu/oit/cs/email/mavmail.php.

16) Student Feedback Survey:  At the end of each term, students enrolled in classes categorized as lecture, seminar, or laboratory will be asked to complete an online Student Feedback Survey (SFS) about the course and how it was taught. Instructions on how to access the SFS system will be sent directly to students through MavMail approximately 10 days before the end of the term. UT Arlington's effort to solicit, gather, tabulate, and publish student feedback data is required by state law; student participation in the SFS program is voluntary.

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Optional Graphics

Colonial Period
Revolutionary Period
Early National Period
The Age of Reform
Slavery
Sectional Conflict
Civil War

 

Colonial Period:

The Atlantic Slave Trade (sketch of slaves packed into a trading ship)
The First Book Printed in the Colonies, 1640 (photograph)
Map of the World-1507 (Johann Ruysch)
Map of the New World-1562 (Diego Gutierrrez)
Map of the Carolinas-1590 (John White)
Map of Manhattan-1639 (Johannes Vingboons)
The Marriage of Pocahontas (painting)
Map of North America and the United States, 1650-1907 (animation)
The Mayflower (painting)
Philadelphia Street Scene-1787 (painting, Peale)
Slaves Landing at Jamestown, 1619 (painting)
Winthrop, John (portrait)
Winthrop, John (portrait-Van Dyke)
Winthrop, John (statue)

 

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Revolutionary Period:

Adams, John (portrait)
Adams, John
(portrait-Trumball)
Adams, John (portrait-Copley)
Adams, John (protrait-Peale, 1791)
Boston Massacre (Paul Revere engraving)
Boston Massacre (Crispus Attucks)
East India Company (opposition broadside, 1773)
Flag--Don't Tread on Me
Franklin, Benjamin (portrait)
Franklin, Benjamin's "Join or Die" Cartoon (1754)
George III (portrait)
The Constitution (original)
The Constitution (signing-Christy painting)
The Declaration of Independence (original)
The Declaration of Independence (original rough draft manuscript)
The Declaration of Independence (George Washington's personal copy)
The Declaration of Independence (signing-John Trumball mural)
Hamilton, Alexander (portrait)
Hamilton, Alexander (portrait-Trumball, 1792)
Henry, Patrick (portrait)
Jay, John (portrait-Stuart, 1795)
Jefferson, Thomas (portrait)
Jefferson, Thomas (portrait-Peale, 1791)
Jefferson, Thomas - Reflections on the Declaration of Independence (last letter to John Adams, original manuscript)
Liberty Tree (cartoon-punishment, 1774)
Liberty Tree (cartoon-tar and feathering, 1774)
Map of the Colonies (1775)
Map of the United States (1790)
Map of North America (1797)
Madison, James (portrait)
Madison, James (portrait-Harding)
Monroe, James (portrait)
Monroe, James (portrait)
Paine, Thomas (portrait)
Slave Sale Broadside (1774)
Washington, George - Diary of The British Surrender at Yorktown (original manuscript)
Washington, George - Attack on Bigotry 1790 (original manuscript)
Washington, George (portrait)
Washington, George (portrait-Peale)

 

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Early National Period:

Adams, John Quincy (portrait-Bingham)
Anti-Bank Cartoon
Anti-Bank 4th of July Cartoon
Erie Canal (painting)
Erie Canal Boats
Erie Canal Map
Harrison, William Henry (portrait)
Jackson, Andrew (portrait-Earl)
Laborers:
        Locksmith (photograph, 1853
        Milliner (photograph, 1854)
        Peddler (photograph)
        Seamstress (photograph, 1853)
The Log Cabin Campaign
Map of the Presidential Election of 1800
Map of the Presidential Election of 1828
Map of the Presidential Election of 1840
Map of the United States, 1810
Map of the United States, 1820
Map of the United States, 1820
(indicates free and slave areas)
Map of the United States, 1830
The Star Spangled Banner (original manuscript)
Treaty of Ghent (signing-portrait, December 24, 1814)
Trail of Tears Map
Van Buren, Martin (photograph)
Van Buren, Martin (photograph)
War of 1812 Anti-British Cartoon I
War of 1812 Anti-British Cartoon II

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The Age of Reform:

Abolitionist Broadside - (1837)
               "Am I Not A Man A Brother" (woodcut)
Abolitionist Broadside Against Slavery in the District of Columbia (1836)
Abolitionist Broadside - The Negro Woman's Appeal (1850s)
Abolitionist Fundraising Leaflet
Abolitionist Punished with Brand (1845)
Abolitionist Rally - Wendell Phillips (illustration -1851) 
Abolitionist Songster - William Wells Brown (1848)
American Colonization Society - Certificate of Membership (1840)
Anthony, Susan B. - Anti-slavery Speech (original manuscript, 1859)
Anti-Abolitionist Cartoon
Anti-Abolitionist Handbill (1837)
Anti-Colonization Song by African Americans (1842)
Anti-Slavery Almanac Illustrations (1840)
Anti-Slavery Children's Book Picture (1859)
Anti-Slavery Convention Declaration (1833)
Brown, John in Court (Broadside, 1959)
Fugitive Slave Abolitionist Broadside (Anthony Burns Case - 1854)
Fugitive Slave Abolitionist Poster (Anthony Burns Case-1854)
Fugitive Slave Kidnapping (1839)
Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 (Broadside, 1850)
Garrison, William Lloyd
(photograph)
Garrison, William Lloyd - Abolitionist Poem (1840)
Garrison, William Lloyd - Abolitionist Song (1841)
Garrison, William Lloyd - The Liberator (May 21, 1831)
Garrison, William Lloyd - The Liberator (close-up, 1831)
Mott, Lucretia (portrait)
Seneca Falls Convention Honor Roll (1848 - Printed 1908)
Stanton, Elizabeth Cady (daguerreotype, 1856)
Stanton, Elizabeth Cady (portrait)
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (engraving, 1862)
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (engraving, 1872)
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (photograph)

 

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Slavery:

Africans Smuggled into the United States, 1860 (illustration)
Douglass, Frederick (portrait)
Douglass, Frederick (photograph)
Manuscript pages from The Narrative of Frederick Douglass
Douglass, Frederick - Two Speeches (1857)
Douglass, Frederick - The North Star (June 20, 1850)
Freedom Certificate (Virginia, 1851)
Runaway Reward Notice (1835)
Runaway Reward Notice (1847)
Slave Market (1852-painting)
Slave Quarters (St. Georges Island, Florida-photograph)
Slave Sale, Easton MD (photograph)
Slave Ship (sketch of slave ship interior-1840)
Slaves on a South Carolina Plantation (1862-photograph)
Tubman, Harriet  (photograph)
Turner, Nat - capture (painting)

 

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Sectional Conflict:

Brown, John (photograph)
Brown, John (daguerreotype, ca. 1850)
Buchanan, James (portrait)
Cass, Lewis (photograph)
Calhoun, John C. (portrait)
Calhoun, John C. (statue)
Calhoun, John C. (lithograph)
Calhoun, John C. (photograph)
Calhoun, John C. Speech on The Compromise of 1850 (original manuscript)
Clay, Henry (portrait)
The Compromise of 1850 (painting of the signing)
The Crisis of 1850 (cartoon)
Douglas, Stephen (photograph)
Douglas, Stephen (photograph)
The Election of 1848 (Whig Broadside)
The Election of 1856 (Republican cartoon)
The Election of 1856 (Republican Handbill)
Fillmore, Millard (photograph)
Fillmore, Millard (portrait)
Fremont, John C. (photograph)
Fremont, John C. (portrait)
Gold Rush (handbill, 1849)
Harper's Ferry Raid (N.Y. Herald headline)
Lincoln, Abraham (photograph)
Lincoln, Abraham Campaign Banner, 1860
Map of the United States, 1850  
Map of the United States, 1860
Map of the Presidential Election of 1844
Map of the Presidential Election of 1848
Map of the Presidential Election of 1852
Map of the Presidential Election of 1856
Map of the Presidential Election of 1860
The Oregon Question (cartoon, 1846)
Pierce, Franklin (portrait)
Polk, James K. (lithograph)
Polk, James K. (photograph)
Polk's Inaugural Address (original)
Scott, Winfield (photograph)
Scott, Winfield (lithograph)
Seward, William (engraving)
Sumner, Charles (photograph)
Sumner, Charles - canning, 1856 (painting)
Taney, Roger (photograph)
Taylor, Zachary (portrait)
Taylor, Zachary (portrait)
Taylor, Zachary (portrait with other presidents)
Taylor, Zachary (daguerreotype-Brady, 1849)
Taylor, Zachary (photograph)
Tyler, John
(portrait)
Tyler, John (engraving)
Webster, Daniel (portrait)

 

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Civil War:

African American Soldiers Hear the Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 (photograph)
African American Army Recruitment Broadside, 1863
African American Soldiers, 1864 (photograph)
African Americans in Richmond, 1865 (photograph)
Brady, Mathew (photograph)
Booth, John Wilkes (photograph, 1862)
Davis, Jefferson (photograph)
Davis, Jefferson (photograph)
The Election of 1864 (Lincoln campaign poster)
The Emancipation Proclamation (original autograph  manuscript copy)
Gettysburg Battlefield (photograph, 1863)
Gettysburg Dedication Ceremony, November 19, 1863 (photograph)
Grant, Ulysses - Cold Harbor, June, 1864 (photograph)
Grant, Ulysses. S.- Looking over General Meade's Shoulder, May 21, 1864 (photograph)
Grant, Ulysses S. (photograph)
Jackson, "Stonewall" (photograph)
Johnson, Andrew (photograph)
Johnson, Andrew - Impeachment Trial
Lee, Robert E. (photograph- Brady)
Lee, Robert E. (photograph)
Lee, Robert E. - Farewell Address (April 10, 1865, original manuscript)
Library of Congress - Civil War Maps
Library of Congress - Civil War Photographs
Lincoln, Abraham (portrait)
Lincoln, Abraham (first inaugural address, original manuscript)
Lincoln, Abraham (first inauguration-photograph)
Lincoln, Abraham (cartoons)
Lincoln, Abraham (assassination-Currier & Ives)
Lincoln, Abraham (joint portrait with Washington and the Constitution; Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation)
Lincoln, Abraham at Antietam with General McLellan, October 3, 1862 (photograph)
Map of the Presidential Election of 1864
Map of the Presidential Election of 1876
Sherman, William T. (photograph, 1864-5)
Slaves Escaping to Freedom, 1862 (photograph)
Slaves in Union Camp, 1863 (photograph)
Slave Whipping (photograph, 1863)
Stephens, Alexander (photograph)
Refugee Family
Volunteer Celebration, Philadelphia, 1861 (lithograph)
Whitman, Walt (photograph)
Wounded Soldiers:
          Amputees (photograph)
          Fredericksburg (photograph)

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