HISTORY 1312:  U.S. HISTORY SINCE 1865

 

Course:       Hist. 1312;  Sections:  010 & 012

 

Semester:     Fall 2013

 

Class Times:  T-TH: 2:00-3:20 p.m.;   T-TH: 3:30-4:50 p.m.

 

Location:     University Hall 115

 

Professor:    Joyce S. Goldberg

 

Office:       University Hall 330

 

Phone:        HISTORY FACULTY HAVE NO OFFICE PHONES

 

Office Hrs.:  T-TH: 9:30-10:30 a.m. (open office hours)

 

Appt. Hrs.:   T-TH: 5:00-6:00 p.m.  (by appointment only)   

 

Email:        goldberg@uta.edu     

 

Website:      http://www.uta.edu/faculty/maizlish/homepagegoldberg.htm

 

Profile:    https://www.uta.edu/mentis/public/#profile/profile/edit/id/12393        

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COURSE  DESCRIPTION  AND  OBJECTIVES

 

This course surveys U.S. history from the end of the Civil War to the end of the Cold War. The study of history is not a search for truth or a reconstruction of the past but an on-going political and cultural debate, one open to evidence-based interpretation.  Knowing historical facts will probably not make you any smarter or help anyone avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. History=s Ausefulness@ is not its predictive or explanatory value but its nurturing an appreciation of the limits of our capacity to see the past clearly or even understand the historical determinants of our own time.  If the study of history does little more than teach humility, skepticism, and highlight the complexity of human actions, then it has done something useful.


STUDENT  LEARNING  OUTCOMES

 

a) Students will be able to analyze and assess arguments based on historical evidence.  They will be able to differentiate between primary and secondary sources and between fact and interpretation.

 

b) Students will be able to identify the relationship between history and memory.  They will be able to identify cultural and political arguments that influence Ahistorical memory.@

 

 

REQUIRED  READING

 

1.  Give  Me  Liberty!   An  American  History     (VOLUME  TWO,  BRIEF THIRD  EDITION)

   Eric Foner  (EF)

 

2.  To Tell the Truth Freely: The Life of Ida B. Wells

       Mia Bay     (MB)

 

3.  Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine, and the Murder of a President

      Candice Millard   (CM)

 

4.  George C. Marshall: Soldier-Statesman of the American Century

   Mark A. Stoler    (MAS)

 

5.  Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock

   David Margolick   (DM)

 

6.  The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Presecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal

     Government

      David K. Johnson  (DKJ)

 

 

All books are available in paperback editions. Some may be available in electronic versions. 

 

 

PLEASE BRING TEXTBOOK AND MONOGRAPH, PAPER, AND A WRITING IMPLEMENT TO EVERY CLASS.


COURSE  REQUIREMENTS  AND  GRADING  PROCEDURES

 

TO PASS THIS COURSE, STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE ALL EXAMS. STUDENTS WHO DO NOT,  AUTOMATICALLY FAIL THE COURSE.   MERELY TAKING ALL EXAMS, HOWEVER, DOES NOT GUARANTEE A PASSING GRADE.

 

There will be five exams (scantrons and pencil rquired), each consisting of thirty multiple choice questions. The sixth exam will consist of fifty (50) multiple choice questions.  These will be drawn from any combination I so design from the textbook, monographs, lectures/discussions, and videos. The total number of points possible for the course is 200.

 

Students in one section may not take an exam in another section without my permission.  Doing so will result in a grade of zero.

 

Makeup exams will be given ONLY on TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3rd, between 2:00 and 5:00 p.m. in UH 115.  None will be multiple-choice. All makeups will consist of structured Identifications and short but formal Essays.  I do not permit exam re-takes; I do not offer extra-credit; I do not grant incompletes.  Students, alone, are responsible for withdrawing from this course.

 

 

I will never send grades by email.

 

Final course grades will be determined by the following scale.

 

 

  180-200 points  = A

  159-179 points  = B

  138-158 point   = C

  115-137 point   = D

Below 115 point   = F

 

Students are expected to keep track of their own performance throughout the semester and to seek guidance and help if their performance level is unsatisfactory.

 


ATTENDANCE POLICY

 

I do not take attendance and it does not factor into your final grade.  I do not penalize students for non-attendance, but neither will I reward students merely for attending class regularly.  Present or not, you are responsible for all work conducted in class.

 

DROP POLICY

 

Students may drop or swap classes through MyMav from the beginning of registration through late registration. After that, students must see their academic advisor to drop a class or withdraw. Undeclared students must see an advisor in the University Advising Center. Drops may occur to a point two-thirds of the way through the semester. It is the student's responsibility to drop. Students will not automatically be dropped for non-attendance. Repayment of certain types of financial aid may be required.  For information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (http://wweb.uta.edu/aao/fao/).

 

EXPECTATIONS FOR OUT-OF-CLASS STUDY

 

For every credit hour earned, students should expect to spend a minimum of about three hours per week working outside class.  Thus a three-hour credit course such as this one has a minimum expectation of about nine hours reading/studying beyond the time spent in class.

 

STUDENTS  WITH  DISABILITIES

 

UTA is committed to all federal equal opportunity legislation, including the Americans with Disabilities Act. All instructors at UTA are required to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities. Any student requiring an accommodation must provide the instructor with official documentation certified by the Office for Students with Disabilities, University Hall 102. Only those who have officially documented a need for accommodation will have their request honored. Information regarding diagnostic criteria and policies for disability-based academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability or by calling the Office for Students with Disabilities at (817) 272-3364.


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

 

Students are expected to adhere to the UTA Honor Code:

 

AI pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington=s tradition of academic intgegrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.  I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources.  I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code.@

 

Faculty may employ the Honor Code as they see fit, including having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per the UT Regents= Rule 50101, '2.2, suspected violations of university=s standards for academic integrity will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may include suspension or expulsion.

 

 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

 

UTA provides a variety of resources and programs designed to help develop academic skills, deal with personal problems, and succeed in class.  Visit the reception desk at University College in Ransom Hall, contact the Maverick Resource Hotline at 817-272-6107, or send an email to resources@uta.edu. Check out their website at www.uta.edu/resources.

 

 

The History Department website also provides links to resources that offer useful tips on reading history books, taking notes, and exam preparation. Go to www.uta.edu/history, Click on AStudent Guides to the Study of History.@ In addition, the textbook used in this course links to a free Astudy space@ that also provides academic assistance and guidance, chapter outlines, sample quizzes, broader questions, maps, and documents.

 

 

PROFESSOR=S  PERSONAL   ADVISORY

 

Six hours of U.S. history are mandated by the Texas legislature.  Many students resent this requirement and do not willingly or happily enroll in this course.  Do not take out your anger on me! I enjoy teaching this class and take my instructional obligations seriously.  Even more important, I require all students to live up to what I consider to be university-level performance.  Just Ashowing up@ does not entitle you to a passing grade. I recommend: 

 

1) Regular attendance and completion of the readings BEFORE class

2) Note-taking from readings, from class discussions, from videos

3) Participation in class discussion

4) Regular rewriting and reviewing of notes

5) Study groups and/or use of the textbook website

6) Serious preparation before each exam.

 

CLASSROOM  DECORUM

 

Although I prefer an atmosphere of informality and good humor, rudeness and incivility are unacceptable and common courtesies will be enforced. 

 

1)  Students should attend all classes, although no records will be kept. You will be neither penalized nor rewarded for attendance. You are, however, responsible for all work transacted every class.

 

2) You are expected to arrive on time AND REMAIN FOR THE DURATION OF THE CLASS. Students arriving late or who must leave early should sit behind the rest of the students. 

 

3) ALL ELECTRONIC TOOLS MUST BE PLACED ON SILENT MODE AND OUT OF SIGHT. NO TEXTING DURING CLASS.

 

4) No electronic devices may be used without my consent (electronic versions of readings constitute an exception).  Those who secure my permission must sign a pledge not to connect to the internet and must agree to sit behind all other students.

 

5) Reading newspapers, sleeping, texting, or other disruptive activities on or off computers are not acceptable classroom behaviors.  Eating and drinking, in moderation, are permitted but please use common sense.


Electronic Communication

 

UTA has adopted MavMail as its official means of communication with students and of transacting university-related business. All students are assigned a MavMail account and are responsible for checking their inbox regularly. Information about using MavMail is available at: http://www.uta.edu/oit/cs/email/mavmail.php.

 

 

 

Student Feedback Survey

 

At the end of the semester, students will be asked to complete an online Student Feedback Survey. Instructions on how to access the survey will come to each student through MavMail before the end of the semester. Each student=s feedback enters a database anonymously.  UTA=s effort to solicit student feedback is required by state law. For more information, visit http://www.uta.edu/sfs.

 

 

Final Review Week

 

The week prior to the first day of final exams is AFinal Review Week.@ During this time, instructors may not make assignments that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabus. During Final Review Week, no instructor will give any exams constituting ten percent or more of the final grade, except for makeup tests. No instructor shall give any portion of the final exam during Review Week.

 

 

Emergency Exit Procedures

 

Should we experience an emergency event that requires vacating the building, students should leave the room through the nearest exit. When exiting the building during an emergency, never use an elevator.  Faculty members will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will assist disabled individuals.

 


READING  ASSIGNMENTS  AND  DISCUSSION  TOPICS

 

In case of inclement weather or school closings, you are required and expected to remain current with the syllabus, including exam dates.

                                           

 

Th-Aug. 22nd:   

Organizational meeting

Course introduction

 

 

T-Aug. 27th:

Civil War Legacies: change or continuity?

 

EF: Preface pp. xxiii (from space)-xxvii; pp. 439-445

MB: Introduction; Ch. 1

CM: Prologue; Ch. 1

 

 

Th-Aug. 29th:    

Reconstruction: tragic era or time of hope?

 

EF: pp. 445-452

CM: Chs. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

 

 

T-Sept. 3rd:

Radical Reconstruction: fulfilling a vision or seeking revenge?

 

EF: pp. 452-461

MB: Ch. 2

 

 

Th-Sept. 5th:      

Counterrevolution: fighting corruption or undoing Reconstruction?

 

EF: pp. 461-465

CM: Chs. 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

 

 

 


T-Sept. 10th:  

Reunion: binding wounds or betrayal of African Americans?

 

EF: pp. 466-472; 516-523

MB: Ch. 3

 

EXAM #1 (bring scantron and pencil)

 

Th-Sept. 12th: 

Industrialization: freedom of contract or freedom to exploit?

 

EF: pp. 474-483; 493-497

CM: Chs. 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

 

T-Sept. 17th:  

Urbanization: institituional inequality or the price of progress?

EF: pp. 497-499; 500-505

MB: Ch. 4

 

Th-Sept. 19th:   

Populism: embattled farmers or turning back the clock?

 

EF: pp. 483-487; 509-516

CM: Chs. 17, 18, 19

 

T-Sept. 24th:   

Progressivism: radical takeover or conservative search for order?

 

EF: 507-509; 523-528; 542-544; 552-573

MB: Ch. 5

 

Exam #2 (bring scantron and pencil)

 

Th-Sept. 26th:   

Old diplomacy to new: fighting for empire or American manhood?

 

EF: pp. 529-540; 575-581

MAS: Ch. 1

 

 


T-Oct. 1st:

World War I: failure of diplomacy or morality?

 

EF: pp. 581-593

MB: Ch. 6

 

Th-Oct. 3rd:

The Great War: the modern world or the modern madness?

 

EF: pp. 593-603

MAS: Ch. 2

 

T-Oct. 8th:

The Wilsonian Moment: self-determination for some or all?

 

EF: pp. 603-608

MB: Ch. 7

 

Exam #3 (bring scantron and pencil)

 

 

Th-Oct. 10th:

Roaring Twenties: modernism or reactionism?

 

EF: pp. 610-617; 624-633

MAS: Ch. 3

 

 

T-Oct. 15th:

Crash and Depression: profligacy or the poverty of abundance?

 

EF: pp. 634-641

MB: Chs. 8, 9

 

 

Th-Oct. 17th:

New Deal: saving, restoring, or destroying capitalism?

 

EF: pp. 643-652; 654-663; 671-672

MAS: Ch. 4


 

 

T-Oct. 22nd:

World Conflict: illusions of neutrality?

 

EF: pp. 674-684

MAS: Ch. 5

 

 

Th-Oct. 24th:

Homefront: don=t you know there=s a war on?

 

EF: pp. 684-689; 691-702

MAS: Ch. 6

 

 

T-Oct. 29th:

Winning the War and Shaping the Peace: descent into cold war?

 

EF: pp. 703-707

MAS: Ch. 7

 

Exam #4 (bring scantron and pencil)

 

 

Th-Oct. 31st:

Truman and Kennan Define the Cold War: means and ends?

 

EF: pp. 709-720; 725-736

MAS: Ch. 8

DKJ: Introduction

 

 

T-Nov. 5th:

Eisenhower Triumphant: holding the line or on the brink?

 

EF: pp. 738-740; 748-755

MAS: Chs. 9, 10


Th-Nov. 7th:

Postwar Civil Rights: justice versus power?

 

EF: pp. 757-764

DKJ: Ch. 1

DM: Prologue; Chs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

 

 

T-Nov. 12th:

Flexible Response: Kennedy the reformer or cold warrior?

 

EF: pp. 765-769; 771-778

DKJ: Ch. 2

DM: Chs. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

 

Exam #5 (bring scantron and pencil)

 

Th-Nov. 14th:

All the Way with LBJ: the Great Society and the great disaster?

 

EF: pp. 778-804

DKJ: Chs. 3

DM: Chs. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21

 

 

T-Nov. 19th:

Vietnamization and Detente: Nixon=s years of peace or turmoil?

 

EF: 806-807; 809-822

DKJ: Chs. 4, 5

DM: Chs. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28

 

 

Th-Nov. 21st:

Conservative Resurgence: the Reagan Revolution?

 

EF: pp. 823-827; 830; 833-842

DKJ: Ch. 6

DM: Chs. 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35


T-Nov. 26th:

The Twenty-First Century: where are we now?  *LONG ASSIGNMENT*

 

EF: pp. 844-851

DKJ: Ch. 7, 8; Epilogue           

DM: Chs. 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

 

 

Th-Nov. 28th:

Thanksgiving break

 

 

T-Dec. 3th:

NO CLASS

MAKEUPS ONLY

MAKEUPS ARE NOT MULTIPLE CHOICE

YOU MAY COME ANYTIME BETWEEN 2:00-5:00 P.M.

BRING ONLY A PEN!

 

 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10th:

section 010: FINAL EXAM (bring scantron and pencil)

2:00-4:30 p.m.

EXAM #6 (bring scantron and pencil)

 

 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12th:

section 012: FINAL EXAM (bring scantron and pencil)

2:00-4:30 p.m.

EXAM #6 (bring scantron and pencil)

 

YOU MUST TAKE YOUR final EXAM ON THE DAY THAT CORRESPONDS TO YOUR OFFICIAL SECTION ENROLLMENT. 

 

No delivery or discussion of grades will ever occur by email.