HISTORY 3324 Section 1
THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR
FALL-2013  
MWF 8-8:50am  
UH11

Professor Maizlish -- UH 313

Open Office Hours: MWF 6:50am-7:50am (UH313)

Appointment Office Hours: MWF 10am-5pm  (Basement of the Main Library)

                                Appointments Must Be Made At Least 24 Hours In Advance
                                                                     
maizlish@uta.edu

               Students are urged, strongly urged, to take advantage of appointment office hours and arrange times to
               meet that are convenient for them.
 

               My goal in establishing appointment hours is to make myself as accessible to students as possible by
               allowing them to fit meetings with me into their own schedules.

               I am now available to meet with students 8 hours-a-day (MWF), 24 hours-a-week.

               For Office Hour Updates See: http://www.uta.edu/faculty/maizlish/office%20hours.htm

Phone: Due to budgetary constraints history faculty no longer have telephones in their offices. 
             Please rely on e-mail for contact.            

E-Mail: maizlish@uta.edu


Useful Link: [University of Texas at Arlington Libraries]

THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR

Readings
Internet Access
Course Outline
Course Requirements
Important Information
Optional Graphics
Sample Exam #1 Answers
Sample Exam#2 Answers
Review Guide



Readings

Required Readings:

Interactive Internet Readings
Walter Johnson, Soul by Soul
Melton A. McLaurin, Celia, A Slave
Herman Melville, Benito Cereno

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin
Kenneth Stampp, The Causes of the Civil War
Charles Dew, Apostles of Disunion

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INTERNET ACCESS

1)  ALL of the required internet readings and ALL of the optional internet readings, 
     may be accessed through internet links on the web page.

2) Computer problems or a down system WILL NOT be an acceptable excuse for missed assignments or a failure to be ready for quizzes and examinations.

               BE PREPARED!!!           PLAN AHEAD!!! 

    DO NOT leave your reading to the last moment,
    or, if you do, MAKE SURE to have back-up computer access available.

3) Please remember that the professor cannot accept assignments or give out grades over the internet.

4) See important information #14, for a list of free campus computer access sites.

5) Although Uncle Tom's Cabin and Benito Cereno can be read on the internet, students may wish to purchase these books rather than read these documents on the web.

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Course Outline

WEEK

DATE TOPIC REQUIRED
READING
OPTIONAL READING
Week I Aug. 23 Introduction --------------  Reading, Writing, and Researching for History: A College Student's Guide
       
Week II Aug. 26 The Old South  Johnson, 1-116 ------------
  Aug. 28 The Origins of American Slavery Johnson, 1-116 1. Capture
2. The Middle Passage
3.Slave Sale Broadside(1774)
Aug. 30 Slavery in Colonial America Johnson, 1-116 William Byrd's Diary

Week III Sept. 2 NO CLASS ----- LABOR DAY ------------  ------------
Sept. 4 QUIZ REVIEW DISCUSSION JOHNSON, 1-116
 
Sept. 6 NO CLASS ----- ------------  ------------

Week IV Sept. 9 The Slaveholders John C. Calhoun on Slavery
George Fitzhugh on Slavery
Sept. 11 The Slaves Johnson, 117-220
------------
Sept. 13 QUIZ REVIEW DISCUSSION JOHNSON, 117-220
INTERNET READING: 
SEPT. 9
------------

 
Week V Sept. 16 The Slave Family & Slave Religion Celia, ALL
1.
Frederick Douglass: "The Meaning of July 4th",1852
2.Runaway Reward Notice (1835)
 1.Slave Narratives-- UNC
2.David Walker's Appeal, 1829
3.Manuscript pages from The Narrative 4.
Celia Documents
Sept. 18 Free African Americans: The Old South Celia, ALL Celia Documents
Sept. 20 Slavery in Brazil Celia, ALL  Celia Documents

Week VI Sept. 23 QUIZ REVIEW DISCUSSION CELIA & ALL
INTERNET READING: SEPT. 16
------------
Sept. 25 Women in the Old South Melville, ALL -------------
Sept. 27 Plain Folk of the Old South Melville, ALL ------------

Week VII Sept. 30 QUIZ REVIEW DISCUSSION MELVILLE, ALL -----------
Oct. 2 MIDTERM EXAMINATION LECTURES & REQUIRED READING: Aug. 26-Sept. 30 -----------
Oct. 4 Free African Americans: The North Stowe, ALL  ------------

Week VIII Oct. 7 Racism in the North Stowe, ALL ------------
Oct. 9 The Age of Reform 1.Stowe, ALL
2.Seneca Falls Declaration
-------------
Oct. 11 Slavery Attacked: Abolitionism 1.Stowe, ALL
2.William Lloyd Garrison
-------------

Week IX Oct. 14 Abolition: The Religious Crusade Stowe, ALL -------------
Oct. 16 Abolition Divided: Anti-Abolition 1.Stowe, ALL 2.Anti-Abolitionist Handbill (1837) --------
Oct. 18 Abolition Attacked:  The Woman Question 1.Stowe, ALL
2.Constitution of the American Antislavery Society, 183

-------------

Week X Oct. 21 QUIZ REVIEW DISCUSSION STOWE & ALL
INTERNET READING: OCT. 7-21
-------------

Oct. 23

MIDTERM EXAMINATION LECTURES & REQUIRED READING: Oct. 7-Oct. 21 ------------

 

Oct. 25

 

Slavery and the Constitution REMEMBER 
MAKE-UP DAY

 

 

The Northwest Ordinance DECEMBER 4th



Pennsylvania's Gradual Abolition of Slavery


Week XI Oct. 28

Slavery Defended:
The Missouri Crisis

 

 

Stampp, Sections I-III
Map of the Missouri Compromise
 

 

-----------

 

 

Oct. 30

Slavery Defended:
Nullification Crisis.

LAST DAY TO DROP CLASSES
Stampp, Sections I-III
1.South Carolina's Ordinance 
of Nullification
2.Andrew Jackson's  
Proclamation on
Nullification
 (From "The Defects of the Confederation" through "I consider then;" from "On such expositions" through "because it would be a solecism.")
 ----------

Nov. 1

The Annexation of Texas and the War
against Mexico
Stampp, Sections I-III
1.Map of the Texas Republic
1.The Inaugural Address of
James K. Polk
2.The Annexation of Texas
3.Opposition to the War with Mexico

Week XII Nov. 4 The Slavery Extension Issue and the Election of 1848
Stampp, Sections I-III
The Wilmot Proviso
------------
Nov. 6 QUIZ REVIEW DISCUSSION Stampp, Sections I-III &
INTERNET READING: Oct. 28-Nov. 4
-----------
Nov. 8


John Brown I
Text: John Brown I
---------------- -------------
Week XIII Nov. 11

Compromise and Chaos

JUST 4 WEEKS TO MAKE-UP DAY DEC. 4th

Stampp, Sections IV-VII
1.
Map of  the 
Compromise of 1850
2.John C. Calhoun on the Compromise of 1850
3.The Crisis of 1850 (cartoon)
 The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850
Nov. 13 The Birth of the Republican Party Stampp, Sections IV-VII
1.The Republican Platform of 1856
2.Charles Sumner on Kansas
3.Charles Sumner's Canning, (painting)
1.The 
Kansas-Nebraska 
Act
2.Lincoln on 
Kansas-Nebraska
Nov. 15 The Road to Disunion I: Dred Scott & the Lecompton Constitution Stampp, Sections IV-VII
Lincoln's House Divided Speech
 1.The Dred Scott 
Decision
2.The Irrepressible Conflict, William Seward, 1858

Week XIV Nov. 18 John Brown II
Text: John Brown II
---------------- -------------
Nov. 20 The Road to Disunion II: John Brown  Stampp, Sections IV-VII
John Brown's Speech to the Court
-----------
Nov. 22 QUIZ REVIEW DISCUSSION


JUST 2 WEEKS TO MAKE-UP DAY
DEC. 4TH   10UH

Stampp, Sections IV-VII & INTERNET READING: Nov. 8-20

----------


Week XV Nov. 25 The Election of 1860 and The Southern Insurrection


JUST 1 WEEK TO
MAKE-UP DAY
DEC. 4TH  10UH
Dew, ALL
1.The Republican Platform of 1860
2.Slavery Expansion, Charleston Mecury, Feb. 28, 1860
3.The Texas Ordinance of    Secession
4.Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Address
5.Abraham Lincoln's Abraham First Inauguration (photograph)
6.Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address

1.The Democratic 
Platform of 1860 
(Douglass faction)
2.The Democratic 
Platform of 1860 
(Breckinridge 
faction)
Nov. 27 NO CLASS  --- THANKSGIVING ----------------- -------------
Nov. 29 NO CLASS  --- THANKSGIVING ----------------- -------------

Week XVI
Dec. 2 The War for the Union           Dew, ALL 1.N.Y.Legis-lature on
Secession

2.Songs of the CivilWar

  

       Dec. 4 QUIZ
REVIEW SESSION

MAKE UP DAY  10UH 
1-6PM
     DEW,  ALL &
     INTERNET
     READINGS:
     NOV. 25
-------
  

                
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  

FINAL EXAMINATION --- FRIDAY --- DEC. 13 --- 8AM-10:30AM

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Course Requirements

MIDTERM EXAMINATIONS

Two midterm examinations will be given during the semester. They will consist of essay and short answer questions and will cover the lectures and the required reading. Each midterm will test knowledge of the material presented in the period immediately preceding the date of the exam. Essay questions for the midterms will be drawn from a study guide that will be placed on the web one week before each of the exams take place. Choices of questions to answer will be offered in both the short answer and essay sections of the exam.

IN ORDER TO PASS THE CLASS, STUDENTS MUST TAKE EACH OF THE MIDTERM EXAMINATIONS IF THEY PRESENT A VALID EXCUSE FOR MISSING AN EXAMINATION, THEY MUST MAKE IT UP BY TAKING A "MAKE-UP" EXAM.  "MAKE-UP" EXAMINATIONS WILL BE GIVEN ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4TH FROM 1PM TO 6PM IN ROOM 10UH THIS IS THE ONLY TIME EXAMS CAN BE MADE UP.  STUDENTS WHO MISS EXAMS MUST PLAN TO TAKE "MAKE-UPS" AT THIS TIME

INCOMPLETES ARE NOT GIVEN IN THIS CLASS.

"Make-up" examinations will not offer students a choice of questions to answer since students who take this late midterm will have more time to study for it than students who take the regularly scheduled exam. The question on the "make-up" exam will be an essay question and it will be drawn from the appropriate study guide.


QUIZZES


Eight quizzes will be given during the semester. They will consist of multiple choice questions and will cover the required reading. Each quiz will test knowledge of the readings assigned for the period immediately preceding the date of the quiz.

IN ORDER TO PASS THE CLASS, STUDENTS MUST TAKE ALL OF THE QUIZZES. ALL MISSED QUIZZES MUST BE MADE-UP. "MAKE-UP" QUIZZES WILL BE GIVEN ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4TH FROM 1PM TO 6PM IN ROOM 10UHTHIS IS THE ONLY TIME QUIZZES CAN BE MADE UP.   STUDENTS WHO MISS QUIZZES MUST PLAN TO TAKE "MAKE-UPS" AT THIS TIME. 

STUDENTS MUST MAKE-UP ALL MISSED QUIZZES TO PASS THE CLASS. HOWEVER, THEY WILL BE PENALIZED FOR MORE THAN TWO MISSED QUIZZES.  THE GRADES ON THE REQUIRED MAKE-UP QUIZZES BEYOND THE FIRST TWO WILL BE PENALIZED AS FOLLOWS:

3RD MISSED QUIZZ:             5 POINTS OFF
4TH MISSED QUIZZ:           10 POINTS OFF
5th, 6TH, 7TH, AND 8TH MISSED QUIZZES: 15 POINTS OFF EACH

EXCUSES FOR MISSED QUIZZES WILL APPLY TO THE ALOTED TWO MISSED QUIZZES ONLY.

INCOMPLETES ARE NOT GIVEN IN THIS CLASS.

"Make-up" quizzes will consist of short answer questions over the reading covered by the quiz that was missed.


CLASS DISCUSSIONS

There will be eight class discussions. Each discussion will follow each of the quizzes and will center on issues raised by the reading covered by the quiz. Attendance at these discussions is required. Students will be graded for their attendance at these discussions.

THE SAME POINT PENALTY SYSTEM USED FOR MISSED QUIZZESS WILL APPLY TO MISSED DISCUSSIONS. STUDENTS WHO TAKE A QUIZ AND THEN LEAVE BEFORE THE DISCUSSION, OR DURING THE DISCUSSION, WILL BE PENALIZED AS DESCRIBED IN THE QUIZ SECTION AS IF THEY HAD MISSED THE QUIZ.


FINAL EXAMINATION


There will be a final examination. It will cover the lectures and the required reading. The first half of the exam will test knowledge of material presented since the previous midterm examination and will consist of essay questions drawn from a study guide that will be placed on the web one week before the final exam. The second half of the exam will cover material presented during the entire semester and will consist of essay questions drawn from all three course study guides. A choice of essay questions to answer will be offered in each section of the exam.

IN ORDER TO PASS THE CLASS, STUDENTS MUST TAKE THE FINAL EXAMINATION.

INCOMPLETES ARE NOT GIVEN IN THIS CLASS.


GRADING


BOTH OF THE TWO MIDTERM EXAMINATIONS, EACH OF THE EIGHT QUIZZES, AND THE FINAL EXAMINATION ARE REQUIRED.  STUDENTS WHO DO NOT COMPLETE ALL OF THESE REQUIREMENTS WILL NOT PASS THE CLASS. 

INCOMPLETES ARE NOT GIVEN IN THIS CLASS.

NO EXTRA CREDIT IS GIVEN IN THIS CLASS. Students are urged to devote all of their class work time to the lectures, the required readings, and preparation for the quizzes and exams. Credit will be given to those who show improvement during the course of the semester.

The course grade will be computed as follows:



1. Eight quizzes -- 20 points each ----------------------- = 160 Points
2. Two midterm examinations -- 100 points each ----- = 200 Points
3. Final examination -- 200 points ---------------------- = 200  
                                                Points Possible points = 560

Points Required:

A=501
B=445
C=389
D=333
F=334 and below

 

ATTENDANCE

ATTENDANCE  IS  STRONGLY URGED

Though attendance does not guarantee success in the class, STUDENTS CANNOT DO WELL WITHOUT ATTENDING EVERY LECTURE. Students who miss a class meeting should get notes for the class they miss from a fellow student. If they have any questions about the notes they receive, they should feel free to ask for clarification from the professor.

CLASS NOTES, LECTURE OUTLINES, AND POWERPOINT SHOWS ARE NOT POSTED ON THE WEB OR ON "BLACKBOARD." NOT EVER!!


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IMPORTANT  INFORMATION:

1) Course Description: 

This course will focus on sectional conflict in the United States from the Missouri Compromise of 1820 to the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. Southern separatism, slavery as a political issue, the antislavery movement, the breakup of the national political system, and the failure of sectional compromise will be major topics covered during the semester.

Our country has known no greater tragedy than the American Civil War.  The causes of this War have fascinated students of American history from the day the conflict began to our time.  Our course will examine the causes of the Civil War, paying particular attention to such topics as: the institution of slavery, the antislavery movement, the issue of slave expansion, and the origins of the Republican Party.  The course will be organized around classroom discussions and lectures.

2) Student Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to describe, identify, and explain the major trends, events, developments, and institutions that led to the American Civil War.

3) Students are encouraged to contact the professor whenever they have questions either during office hours or by email, however, email attachments cannot be opened.

4) Grades cannot be given out or discussed over the internet or on the phone and they will not be posted on "Blackboard." However, students are welcome to ask the professor before or after class, or during office hours, for their grades or their current class average. To find out the final exam grade, students may leave a stamped, self-addressed envelope or postcard in their final exam blue book or in the professor's mail box in the History Department office, 202UH. Course grades can be discussed with the professor at the start of the following semester.

5) PLEASE TURN OFF ALL CELL PHONES AND SET ALL BEEPERS TO SILENT MODE WHILE IN CLASS. TEXT MESSAGING IS NOT ALLOWED DURING THE CLASS PERIOD OR DURING EXAMINATIONS.

CELL PHONES MAY NOT BE VISIBLE DURING CLASS TIME OR DURING EXAMINATIONS.
THEY SHOULD BE SECRETED IN A PLACE WHERE THEY CANNOT BE SEEN, TOUCHED, OR HEARD
.

THE USE OF CAMERAS IN THE CLASSROOM IS ALSO STRICTLY PROHIBITED. THE TAKING OF PHOTGRAPHS OR SCREEN SHOTS IS NOT ALLOWED.

6) If you wish to use a tape recorder, please first see the professor to gain approval . 

7) LAPTOP COMPUTER USE OR THE USE OF I-PADS OR OTHER SUCH DEVICES IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

8) If you wish to audit the class, please first see the professor.

9) STUDENTS ARE URGED TO KEEP ALL OF THEIR QUIZZES AND MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS UNTIL COURSE GRADES ARE RECEIVED FROM THE REGISTRAR.  Clerical errors cannot be identified and corrected without the evidence provided by these test papers.

10) Students who come to class on time should keep the back rows of the classroom empty. Students who come in late or need to leave early should sit in the back rows.

11) Drop Policy: Students may drop or swap (adding and dropping a class concurrently) classes through self-service in MyMav from the beginning of the registration period through the late registration period. After the late registration period, students must see their academic advisor to drop a class or withdraw. Undeclared students must see an advisor in the University Advising Center. Drops can continue through a point two-thirds of the way through the term or session. It is the student's responsibility to officially withdraw if they do not plan to attend after registering. Students will not be automatically dropped for non-attendance. Repayment of certain types of financial aid administered through the University may be required as the result of dropping classes or withdrawing. For more information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships (http://wweb.uta.edu/aao/fao/). 

12) Americans with Disabilities Act: The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of all federal equal opportunity legislation, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). All instructors at UT Arlington are required by law to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Any student requiring an accommodation for this course must provide the instructor with official documentation in the form of a letter certified by the staff in the Office for Students with Disabilities, University Hall 102. Only those students who have officially documented a need for an accommodation will have their request honored. Information regarding diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining disability-based academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability or by calling the Office for Students with Disabilities at (817) 272-3364. 

13) Academic Integrity: Students enrolled in this course are expected to adhere to the UT Arlington Honor Code: 

I pledge, on my honor, to uphold UT Arlington’s tradition of academic integrity, a tradition that values hard work and honest effort in the pursuit of academic excellence.

I promise that I will submit only work that I personally create or contribute to group collaborations, and I will appropriately reference any work from other sources. I will follow the highest standards of integrity and uphold the spirit of the Honor Code. 

UT Arlington faculty members may employ the Honor Code as they see fit in their courses, including (but not limited to) having students acknowledge the honor code as part of an examination or requiring students to incorporate the honor code into any work submitted. Per UT System Regents’ Rule 50101, §2.2, suspected violations of university’s standards for academic integrity (including the Honor Code) will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with University policy, which may result in the student’s suspension or expulsion from the University. 

14) Free UT Arlington Campus Computer Access:

Ransom Hall - 1st Floor
University Hall - Basement
Central Library

15) Student Support Services: UT Arlington provides a variety of resources and programs designed to help students develop academic skills, deal with personal situations, and better understand concepts and information related to their courses. Resources include tutoring, major-based learning centers, developmental education, advising and mentoring, personal counseling, and federally funded programs. For individualized referrals, students may visit the reception desk at University College (Ransom Hall), call the Maverick Resource Hotline at 817-272-6107, send a message to resources@uta.edu, or view the information at www.uta.edu/resources.  

16) Electronic Communication: UT Arlington has adopted MavMail as its official means to communicate with students about important deadlines and events, as well as to transact university-related business regarding financial aid, tuition, grades, graduation, etc. All students are assigned a MavMail account and are responsible for checking the inbox regularly. There is no additional charge to students for using this account, which remains active even after graduation. Information about activating and using MavMail is available at http://www.uta.edu/oit/cs/email/mavmail.php. 

17) Student Feedback Survey: At the end of each term, students enrolled in classes categorized as “lecture,” “seminar,” or “laboratory” shall be directed to complete an online Student Feedback Survey (SFS). Instructions on how to access the SFS for this course will be sent directly to each student through MavMail approximately 10 days before the end of the term. Each student’s feedback enters the SFS database anonymously and is aggregated with that of other students enrolled in the course. UT Arlington’s effort to solicit, gather, tabulate, and publish student feedback is required by state law; students are strongly urged to participate. For more information, visit http://www.uta.edu/sfs. 

18) Final Review Week: A period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabus. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week. During this week, classes are held as scheduled. In addition, instructors are not required to limit content to topics that have been previously covered; they may introduce new concepts as appropriate. 

19) Emergency Exit Procedures: Should we experience an emergency event that requires us to vacate the building, students should exit the room and move toward the nearest exit, which is located in the back and front of room When exiting the building during an emergency, one should never take an elevator but should use the stairwells. Faculty members and instructional staff will assist students in selecting the safest route for evacuation and will make arrangements to assist handicapped individuals.

 

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Optional Graphics

Colonial Period
Revolutionary Period
Early National Period
The Age of Reform
Slavery
Sectional Conflict
Civil War

 

Colonial Period:

Slaves Landing at Jamestown, 1619 (painting)

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Revolutionary Period:

Slave Sale Broadside (1774)

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The Age of Reform:

Abolitionist Broadside - (1837)
               "Am I Not A Man A Brother" (woodcut)
               "Our Countrymen in Chains" (poem by John Greenleaf Whitter)
Abolitionist Broadside Against Slavery in the District of Columbia (1836)
Abolitionist Broadside - The Negro Woman's Appeal (1850s)
Abolitionist Fundraising Leaflet
Abolitionist Punished with Brand (1845)
Abolitionist Rally - Wendell Phillips (illustration -1851) 
Abolitionist Songster - William Wells Brown (1848)
American Colonization Society - Certificate of Membership (1840)
Anthony, Susan B. - Anti-slavery Speech (original manuscript, 1859)
Anti-Abolitionist Cartoon
Anti-Abolitionist Handbill (1837)
Anti-Colonization Song by African Americans (1842)
Anti-Slavery Almanac Illustrations (1840)
Anti-Slavery Children's Book Picture (1859)
Anti-Slavery Convention Declaration (1833)
Brown, John in Court (Broadside, 1959)
Fugitive Slave Abolitionist Broadside (Anthony Burns Case - 1854)
Fugitive Slave Abolitionist Poster (Anthony Burns Case-1854)
Fugitive Slave Kidnapping (1839)
Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 (Broadside, 1850)
Garrison, William Lloyd
(photograph)
Garrison, William Lloyd - Abolitionist Poem (1840)
Garrison, William Lloyd - Abolitionist Song (1841)
Garrison, William Lloyd - The Liberator (May 21, 1831)
Garrison, William Lloyd - The Liberator (close-up, 1831)
Mott, Lucretia (portrait)
Seneca Falls Convention Honor Roll (1848 - Printed 1908)
Stanton, Elizabeth Cady (daguerreotype, 1856)
Stanton, Elizabeth Cady (portrait)
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (engraving, 1862)
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (engraving, 1872)
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (photograph)

 

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Slavery:

Africans Smuggled into the United States, 1860 (illustration)
Douglass, Frederick (portrait)
Douglass, Frederick (photograph)
Manuscript pages from The Narrative of Frederick Douglass
Douglass, Frederick - Two Speeches (1857)
Douglass, Frederick - The North Star (June 20, 1850)
Freedom Certificate (Virginia, 1851)
Runaway Reward Notice (1835)
Runaway Reward Notice (1847)
Slave Market (1852-painting)
Slave Quarters (St. Georges Island, Florida-photograph)
Slave Sale, Easton MD (photograph)
Slave Ship (sketch of slave ship interior-1840)
Slaves on a South Carolina Plantation (1862-photograph)
Tubman, Harriet  (photograph)
Turner, Nat - capture (painting)

 

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Sectional Conflict:

Brown, John (photograph)
Brown, John (daguerreotype, ca. 1850)
Buchanan, James (portrait)
Cass, Lewis (photograph)
Calhoun, John C. (portrait)
Calhoun, John C. (statue)
Calhoun, John C. (lithograph)
Calhoun, John C. (photograph)
Calhoun, John C. Speech on The Compromise of 1850 (original manuscript)
Clay, Henry (portrait)
The Compromise of 1850 (painting of the signing)
The Crisis of 1850 (cartoon)
Douglas, Stephen (photograph)
Douglas, Stephen (photograph)
The Election of 1848 (Whig Broadside)
The Election of 1856 (Republican cartoon)
The Election of 1856 (Republican Handbill)
Fillmore, Millard (photograph)
Fillmore, Millard (portrait)
Fremont, John C. (photograph)
Fremont, John C. (portrait)
Gold Rush (handbill, 1849)
Harper's Ferry Raid (N.Y. Herald headline)
Lincoln, Abraham (photograph)
Lincoln, Abraham Campaign Banner, 1860
Map of the United States, 1850  
Map of the United States, 1860
Map of the Presidential Election of 1844
Map of the Presidential Election of 1848
Map of the Presidential Election of 1852
Map of the Presidential Election of 1856
Map of the Presidential Election of 1860
The Oregon Question (cartoon, 1846)
Pierce, Franklin (portrait)
Polk, James K. (lithograph)
Polk, James K. (photograph)
Polk's Inaugural Address (original)
Scott, Winfield (photograph)
Scott, Winfield (lithograph)
Seward, William (engraving)
Sumner, Charles (photograph)
Sumner, Charles - canning, 1856 (painting)
Taney, Roger (photograph)
Taylor, Zachary (portrait)
Taylor, Zachary (portrait)
Taylor, Zachary (portrait with other presidents)
Taylor, Zachary (daguerreotype-Brady, 1849)
Taylor, Zachary (photograph)
Tyler, John
(portrait)
Tyler, John (engraving)
Webster, Daniel (portrait)

 

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Civil War:

African American Soldiers Hear the Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 (photograph)
African American Army Recruitment Broadside, 1863
African American Soldiers, 1864 (photograph)
African American Soldiers, 1865 (photograph)
African Americans in Richmond, 1865 (photograph)
African Americans at Work - James River, VA
(photograph)
Brady, Mathew (photograph)
Booth, John Wilkes (photograph, 1862)
Davis, Jefferson (photograph)
Davis, Jefferson (photograph)
The Draft in the North (cartoon)
The Election of 1864 (Lincoln campaign poster)
The Emancipation Proclamation (original autograph  manuscript copy)
Gettysburg Battlefield (photograph, 1863)
Gettysburg Dedication Ceremony, November 19, 1863 (photograph)
Grant, Ulysses - Cold Harbor, June, 1864 (photograph)
Grant, Ulysses. S.- Looking over General Meade's Shoulder, May 21, 1864 (photograph)
Grant, Ulysses S. (photograph)
Jackson, "Stonewall" (photograph)
Johnson, Andrew (photograph)
Johnson, Andrew (photograph)
Johnson, Andrew - Impeachment Trial
Lee, Robert E. (photograph- Brady)
Lee, Robert E. (photograph)
Lee, Robert E. - Farewell Address (April 10, 1865, original manuscript)
Library of Congress - Civil War Maps
Library of Congress - Civil War Photographs
Lincoln, Abraham (portrait)
Lincoln, Abraham (first inaugural address, original manuscript)
Lincoln, Abraham (first inauguration-photograph)
Lincoln, Abraham (cartoons)
Lincoln, Abraham (assassination-Currier & Ives)
Lincoln, Abraham (joint portrait with Washington and the Constitution; Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation)
Lincoln, Abraham at Antietam with General McLellan, October 3, 1862 (photograph)
Map of the Presidential Election of 1864
Map of the Presidential Election of 1876
Refugee Family (photograph)
Religious Service, New York Militia, 1861 (photograph)
Sherman, William T. (photograph, 1864-5)
Slaves Escaping to Freedom, 1862 (photograph)
Slaves in Union Camp, 1863 (photograph)
Slave Whipping (photograph, 1863)
Stephens, Alexander (photograph)
Volunteer Celebration, Philadelphia, 1861 (lithograph)
Whitman, Walt (photograph)
Wounded Soldiers:
          Amputation, Gettysburg - July, 1865 (photograph)
          Amputees (photograph)
          Chancellorsville - May 2, 1863 (photograph)
          Fredericksburg (photograph)

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