THE UNITED STATES CIVIL WAR
HISTORY 5301
Spring 2014
W 7-9:50pm

Professor Maizlish -- 313 UH

Open Office Hours: MWF 6:50am-7:50am (UH313);
                                       W 5:50pm-6:50pm
(UH313)

Appointment Office Hours: MWF 9am-5pm  (Basement of the Main Library)

                                Appointments Must Be Made At Least 24 Hours In Advance
                                                                     
maizlish@uta.edu

               Students are urged, strongly urged, to take advantage of appointment office hours and arrange times to
               meet that are convenient for them.
 
               My goal in establishing appointment hours is to make myself as accessible to students as possible by
               allowing them to fit meetings with me into their own schedules.

               I am now available to meet with students 9 hours-a-day Monday and Friday and 10 hours on Wednesday,
               28 hours-a-week.


               For Office Hour Updates See: http://www.uta.edu/faculty/maizlish/office%20hours.htm

Phone: Due to budgetary constraints history faculty no longer have telephones in their offices. 
             Please rely on e-mail for contact.            

E-Mail: maizlish@uta.edu

COURSE OUTLINE

 I. The Confederate War

Week 1  Jan. 15 Introduction
                             Gary W. Gallagher, The Confederate War
                                                                                             CRITIQUE DUE

Week 2  Jan. 22    William Freehling, South vs. South
                                                                                             CRITIQUE DUE

                                                                              SAMPLE CRITIQUE

Week 3  Jan. 29    Stephanie McCurry, Confederate Reckoning
                                                                                             CRITIQUE DUE

Week 4  Feb. 5    NO CLASS--HISTORIOGRAPHIC PAPER #1 DUE

SAMPLE PAPER


                                             II - The Soldiers' War                                          

Week 5  Feb. 12  Gerald Linderman, Embattled Courage
                                                                                            CRITIQUE DUE

       
Week 6  Feb 19   James McPherson, For Cause & Comrades
                                                                                            CRITIQUE DUE

Week 7  Feb. 26  Lorien Foote, The Gentlemen and the Roughs
                                                                                              CRITIQUE DUE

Week 8  Mar.  5    NO CLASS--HISTORIOGRAPHIC PAPER #2 DUE

TWO CLASS PAPERS

------------------VACATION-----------------

III - The Destructive War

Week 9  Mar. 19    Charles Royster, The Destructive War, pages xi-192
                                                                                               CRITIQUE DUE

Week 10 Mar. 26  Charles Royster. The Destructive War, pages 193-417
                                                                                               CRITIQUE DUE

Week 11 Apr. 2    Mark Grimsley, The Hard Hand of War
                                                                                             CRITIQUE DUE 
 

Week 12 Apr.  9   NO CLASS--HISTORIOGRAPHIC PAPER #3 DUE 


 IV- The Meaning of the Civil War in American Memory

Week 13 Apr. 16  Drew Faust, This Republic of Suffering
                                                                                              CRITIQUE DUE

Week 14 Apr. 23  Chandra Manning, What This Cruel War Was Over
                                                                                             CRITIQUE DUE   

Week 15 Apr. 30 David Blight, Race and Reunion; pages 1-170
                                                                                               CRITIQUE DUE

Finals      May 7    NO CLASS--HISTORIOGRAPHIC PAPER #4 DUE
Week 

WRITTEN WORK

CRITIQUES

Critiques of assigned books should be NO MORE than one to two double-spaced, typed pages in length. They should contain three paragraphs. The first paragraph should state the thesis of the book. The second should explain how the author attempts to demonstrate the thesis. The third paragraph should evaluate the extent to which the author has made a convincing case.

No critique may total more than TWO pages in length. Normal margins must be maintained.

HISTORIOGRAPHIC PAPERS

Papers should be SIX to SEVEN double-spaced, typed pages in length and NO MORE than EIGHT double spaced, typed pages in length. They should evaluate the historiographic issues raised by that unit's readings. They are NOT book reports, but rather analyses of historical interpretation. They should explain and defend the interpretation of that unit's topic that the student finds to be the most persuasive. They are NOT summaries of the books.

CLASS PARTICIPATION

Participation in class discussions is required and will be graded. Grading will be based on the degree of participation.  

GRADING

Each of the four papers and all of the twelve critiques are required. Students who do not complete all of the required assignments will not pass the class. All late papers and critiques will be penalized. The grades of papers and critiques that are up to one week late will be lowered by ONE grade level. The grades of papers and critiques that are more than one week and up to three weeks late will be lowered by TWO grade levels. The grades of papers and critiques that are over three weeks late will be lowered by THREE grade levels. PLAN AHEAD!!!  ALL LATE CRITIQUES AND PAPERS WILL BE PENALIZED.

Critiques are due at 7pm on the day of the class meeting.  They may be turned in at the start of class or placed in the envelope on the door to room 313UH anytime before class begins. Papers should be placed in the envelope on the door to room 313UH no later than 7pm on the due date listed on this syllabus.

Grading of class participation will be based on the degree of participation. CLASS ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED. ABSENCES WILL BE PENALIZED. Students will receive only 7 of a possible 10 points for the first discussion missed, 4 points for the second missed, and 0 points for each of the next missed meetings. Points for excused and unexcused absences will be calculated in the same way as described above. Students should attend class even if they have failed to prepare a critique otherwise the penalty they will receive for a late critique will be compounded by the penalty they will receive for being absent from class. Students who leave class before class is over will be graded as absent. Students who are late to class will be penalized.

There is no extra credit in this class and no grade on an assignment will be dropped. No critique or paper can be re-written for a higher grade.

The course grade will be computed as follows:

Critiques -------------------- 39%  or 400 points or 30 points for each of the first 4
                                                       critiques, 35 points for each of the remaining 8.
Papers ----------------------  49%  or 500 points or 125 points for each paper.
Classroom Participation --- 12%  or 120 points or 10 points for each discussion.

There are 1020 possible points in the class.

A=912 or higher
B=810-911
C=708-809
D=606-707
F=605 or lower

While completion of all the assignments is required, completion of them does not guarantee any specific grade, or even a passing grade.

GRADE CALCULATIONS WILL BE BASED ON THE QUALITY OF PERFORMANCE.  GRADES WILL NOT BE BASED ON COMPLETION OF ASSIGNMENTS.  STUDENTS SHOULD NOT EXPECT TO RECEIVE CREDIT TOWARDS ANY GRADE SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY COMPLETED THE WORK ASSIGNED IN THE CLASS.

ABSOLUTELY NO INCOMPLETES WILL BE GIVEN IN THIS CLASS.
NONE
.
 ABSOLUTELY NONE
.


ADDITIONAL NOTES

1) Course Description:

This course will examine the recent historical literature of the United States Civil War. It will be divided into four separate units. The first will assess the conflicting understandings of the nature of the confederacy. The second will focus on the debate over the military experience and the attitudes of Civil War soldiers. The third will focus on the destructive nature of the Civil War. Finally, the course will review the the meaning of the Civil War in American memory.

2) Student Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to describe, identify, and explain major historical interpretations of  the American Civil War.

3) If you require an accommodation based on a disability, please see the professor as soon as it is convenient. Student responsibility primarily rests with informing faculty of their need for accommodation and in providing authorized documentation through designated administrative channels.  Information regarding specific diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability.   Also, you may visit the Office for Students with Disabilities in room 102 of University Hall or call them at (817) 272-3364.

4) Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student, or the attempt to commit such acts. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and dismissal from the University. Since the dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

5) PLEASE TURN OFF ALL CELL PHONES AND SET ALL BEEPERS TO SILENT MODE WHILE IN CLASS. TEXT MESSAGING IS NOT ALLOWED DURING THE CLASS.

CELL PHONES MAY NOT BE VISIBLE DURING CLASS TIME.
THEY SHOULD BE SECRETED IN A PLACE WHERE THEY CANNOT BE SEEN, TOUCHED, OR HEARD
.

6) LAPTOP COMPUTER USE OR THE USE OF I-PADS OR OTHER SUCH DEVICES IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

7) If you wish to audit the class, please see me.

8) Please be sure to keep all of your critiques and papers until you receive your course grade from the registrar. Clerical errors cannot be identified and corrected without the evidence provided by these assignments.

9) ASSIGNMENTS CANNOT BE ACCEPTED OR GRADES GIVEN OUT OVER THE INTERNET. NO EMAIL ATTACHMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTED OR OPENED.

10) This class does not use "Blackboard" in any way whatsoever.