Robotics

EE4391/EE4315/EE 5325, Spring 2013, Course Flyer


1. Instructor: Dan Popa
2. Office Location: NH 543, and UTARI room 211 (off-campus), find directions here.
3. Office Hours: Tue and Thu 2:00-4:00 pm, in NH 543
4. Phone: 817-272-5982
5. Fax: 817-272-5952
6. Email: popa@uta.edu
Course Venue NH 250

7. Course Prerequisites:

Please come see me, call me, or email me if you have additional questions prior to signing up for the course.

8. Required Readings/Materials:

Textbooks:

  • Robot Modeling and Control, by M.W. Spong, S. Hutchinson, M.Vidyasagar (required by EE 5325 students).
  • Robotics, Appin Knowledge Solutions (required by EE 4315 students)
  • Mathematical Introduction to Robotic Manipulation by Richard M. Murray, Zexiang Li, S. Shankar Sastry (on reserve, free download)
  • Robot Manipulator Control: Theory and Practice (Control Engineering, 15) by Frank L. Lewis, et al (on reserve)
  • Introduction to Robotics: Mechanics and Control (3rd Edition) by John J. Craig (on reserve)
  • Autonomous Mobile Robots, by S. S. Ge, F. L. Lewis (on reserve).
  • Introduction to Robotics, by Phillip John McKerrow , Publisher: Addison-Wesley Pub (Sd) (May 1991)
  • MATLAB Robotics Toolbox by Peter Corke, free download
  • ROS and GAZEBO simulation environments, by Willow Garage and OSRF, free download


9. Course Description:
This is a project-based robotics course, containing both introductory as well as more advanced concepts. It presents a broad overview of robotic manipulation and also focuses on fundamentals such as robot kinematics, dynamics, control and planning. This year, the course will focus on concepts in support of major IEEE, DARPA, NASA and AUVSI team projects. The course is divided between three areas:
  • Robot manipulator kinematics & dynamics
  • Robot control and planning
  • Perception and navigation for mobile robotics

10. Course Learning Goals/Objectives:
The goals of the course are as follows:
  1. To introduce students to multi-discpiplinary aspect of robotics.
  2. To provide students with a solid background of fundamental concepts and methods in kinematics, dynamics, control and planning.
  3. To provide assignments that will allow students to solidify these concepts.
  4. To introduce robotics sofware and simulation environments, such as ROS, GAZEBO, LABVIEW, and MATLAB.

11. Tentative Lecture Schedule:
  • Week 1 - Jan 15, 17, Lectures 1,2
    • Intro to robotics: History of robotics ; Examples of robots
    • Robotics Jargon ; Course Projects
    • Lecture 1
    • Lecture 2
  • Week 2 - Jan 22, 24 Lectures 3,4
    • Review of basics: Matrix algebra
    • Intro to Robot Kinematics: Geometric issues ; Frames ; Notation
    • Lecture notes
  • Week 3 - Jan 29, 31, Lectures 5,6
    • Homogeneous Transforms, Parameterizations and Singularities
    • Lecture notes
  • Week 4 -Feb 5, 7, Lectures 7,8
  • Week 5 - Feb 12, 14, Lectures 9, 10
    • Intro to robot kinematics using MATLAB, Gazebo and ROS
    • Robot Manipulability and Singularities; Statics
    • Lecture notes
    • Slides
  • Week 6 - Feb 19, 21, Lectures 11, 12
    • Robot Dynamics: Newton Euler formulation ; Euler-Lagrange formulation
  • Week 7 - Feb 26, 28, Lectures 12, 13
    • Mobile robots: Kinematics and dynamics ; Nonholonomic robots
    • Lecture notes
  • Week 8 -March 5, 7, Lectures 14, 15
    • Robot Simulation using Gazebo and ROS
    • Project teams/progress; class presentations on March 7
  • Week 9 – March 11-15, Spring Break
  • Week 10 - March 19, 21, Lectures 16, 17
  • Week 11 - March 26, 28, Lectures 18, 19
  • Week 12 - April 2, 4, Lectures 20, 21
  • Week 13 – April 9, 11, Lectures 22, 23
  • Week 14 - April 16, 18, Lectures 24, 25
  • Week 15 - April 23, 25, Lectures 26, 27
  • Week 16 - April 30, May 2 Lectures 28, 29
    • Project due with class presentation on April 30, May 2.
    • Report format: a paper, 4 pages per student, 10 pt font, using IEEE template
    • (see http://www.ieee.org/conferences_events/conferences/publishing/templates.html )
    • Multiple students working on the same project should submit a single report
    • Project report is due May 2 in class, no late submissions will be accepted.
  • Week 17 - May 9
    • In class final (comprehensive).


12. Specific Course Requirements:
  • Examinations: One midterm and one final for EE 4315, 5325 stdents
  • Projects: One final project with presentation and report, for all students
  • Final Examination: Final Exam Comprehensive
  • Grading Format Weighting: 25% Midterm; 25% Final Project; 50% Final. Grades will be assigned on the following scale: >85% - A, >70% B, >50% C, >30% D
  • Academic Dishonesty will not be tolerated. All exams are individual assignments. Your assignments will be carefully scrutinized to ensure a fair grade for everyone.
  • Attendance and Drop Policy: Attendance is not mandatory. However, you are responsible for all material covered in class regardless of absences.
  • Additional Information: The class project will require simulation or experimental validation of concepts learned in class as well as an in-class oral presentation. A list of projects based on major international robotics competitions will be provided.

13. Additional Materials