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UT Arlington In The News - Monday, September 10, 2012

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Monday, September 10, 2012

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DMN guest column on Dallas Museum Tower-Nasher Sculpture Center issue cites Buckley, Gatzke

With the Museum Tower-Nasher Sculpture Center imbroglio making its way to a resolution, many are turning their minds to how we can make sure this kind of thing never happens again, Lee Cullum wrote in a Dallas Morning News guest column. Cullum noted a proposed ban on buildings with more than 30 percent reflectivity -- the suggestion of a group of architects and seconded by Michael Buckley, director of the Center for Metropolitan Density at The University of Texas at Arlington. Don Gatzke, dean of the UT Arlington School of Architecture, has proposed that developers of major buildings be required to conduct computer simulations, testing the impact on neighbors of heat, glare, shade and wind created by high-rise structures and their materials, the piece said.

KTVT interviews Jensen-Campbell for special program on bullying

KTVT/CBS 11 broadcast an extended interview with Lauri Jensen-Campbell, a UT Arlington associate professor of psychology, about child bullying. Jensen-Campbell and her team have researched child bullying in hundreds of middle school students. Her team discovered that the children that had been bullied had lower levels of cortisone. Their research of younger children who had been bullied noticed symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. “The more severe the bullying or the more chronic the bullying, the more we’re seeing them reporting symptoms associated with PTSD and also greater symptoms of depression and anxiety.”

KENS5.com reports on UT Arlington's new Math Emporium

KENS5.com (San Antonio) published The Texas Tribune report on UT Arlington’s Math Emporium, a 5,800-square-foot space where algebra students will spend two-thirds of their class time working on desktop computers at their own pace rather than sitting through traditional lectures. A chief benefit of the model is that students are forced to work out problems themselves and can receive instant, individualized feedback from teachers who are available in the lab.

Strategy + Business.com reports on Zhang research of online retailers and shipping fees

Jie Zhang, a UT Arlington assistant professor of information systems and operations management, co-authored a study on online retailers and shipping fees, Strategy+Business.com reported. Internet retailers strategically manipulate their base and shipping prices, as well as delivery options they offer to customers, to maximize profits and gain a competitive advantage, the paper finds.

UT Arlington speech professor remembered

Sondra O. Kaufman used her sharp wit and flair for the dramatic among her family, friends and students at The University of Texas at Arlington, but she was also passionate about her support of Jewish causes, The Dallas Morning News reported. She died Aug. 27 in her home. She was 83. Kaufman was a speech professor for 25 years at UT Arlington before retiring and focusing her time traveling the world promoting Jewish issues.

Former Arlington city councilman remembered

Former Arlington City Council member Gene Patrick died Saturday, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and WFAA.com reported. He was 72. He represented District 8 for four terms and had been re-elected to a fifth term, but stepped down last November due to health concerns. He also served on the UT Arlington Development Board. Patrick attended UT Arlington when it was known as Arlington State College.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram quotes Saxe on difference third-party candidate could make in presidential election

Allan Saxe, a UT Arlington associate professor of political science, was quoted in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram article about third-party candidates that could make a difference in the tight presidential election. “The closer the election, the more influence third and other parties have,” Saxe said.

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