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Office of Information Technology (OIT)

UT Arlington
OIT: Office of Information Technology

helpdesk@uta.edu ·  Work Order · 817-272-2208 · System Status

We are your IT partner!

FaQ

  1. If you are using Windows, how do you find out what operating system you are using?

  2. If you are using Macintosh then how do you find out what operating system you are using?

  3. Why won't my PC game, X-Box, Playstation, etc won't work in the dorms?

  4. What is ResNet?

  5. What is a network card and a network cable?

  6. What happens if my ResNet connection isn't working?

Question: If you are using Windows, how do you find out what operating system you are using?

  1. Click on Start, then Run
  2. Type in "winver" in the Run dialog box
  3. Hit Enter/Ok

Question: If you are using Macintosh then how do you find out what operating system you are using?

  1. Click on the Apple icon
  2. Click on "About This Mac"
  3. Click More Info

Question: Why won't my PC game, X-Box, Playstation, etc won't work in the dorms?

The Residential Network (ResNet) was not designed for gaming and nor is the campus network in general. If you need to have your gaming application access the network, UT Arlington Housing will allow you to subscribe with Time Warner to get a cable modem installed in your room.

The campus network is not intended for gaming purposes. OIT currently does not have any problems with the residents using the network for game playing as long as such activity does not create any network problems. But unfortunately, OIT does not have the personnel or resources to effectively support online gaming.

While OIT does not do anything with the intention of preventing or impairing online gaming via UTA network, there are changes to the network implemented (primarily involving security issues ) from time to time and these changes could have an effect on online gaming in general.

At this point, OIT is not in a position to make a determination as to if these changes have impacted your gaming experience or not.

If you're interested in an alternative to using the UTA network for your online gaming purposes, you may wish to consider getting an outside ISP to provide you with connectivity. (See Housing and Resident's Life "Guide for Ethernet, Cable Television, and Telephone Services") Residential Network Responsible Usage Policy.

Question: What is ResNet?

ResNet is the on-campus network Internet service for current UTA residents living in Housing Residence Halls.

Question: What is a network card and a network cable?

Because this question cannot be answered without using the words "network" and "card", it is best answered using pictures.

1

 

The card on the left is a 56K modem.  It is used for dialup Internet service and cannot be used for high speed network access.

A network cable will not fit in the in/out jacks as they are designed to only accommodate telephone cords.

The jacks use telephone cords that have 4 copper connecting contacts.

 

2

 

The card on the left is a network card, also sometimes referred to as an Ethernet card.

While appearing slightly similar to a modem, they are not the same and cannot perform the same functions.

Network cards use network cables that have 8 copper contacts.  Phone cords will NOT work.

Some network cards have status lights that indicate whether or not they are functioning.  Most cards that do possess status lights have one that will constantly remain on.

 

3

 

This is another example of a network card.

 

 

What is the difference between a telephone cord and a network cable?

 

The cable on the left is a network cable.  Also known as a Category 5, UTP (unshielded twisted pair), 568A/B, or Patch Cable.  The color of the cable is unimportant, however most network cables found at UT Arlington are blue in color.  The most important distinguishing features of a network cable are:

 

  • cable has round body, relatively thick compared to phone line
  •  

    cable has large connecting head as compared to phone line

  • cable has 8 copper "teeth" or metallic connecting surfaces, phone line only has 4

  • cable will not easily fit into standard one line phone jack without excessive force

The cable on the right is a standard one line telephone cord.  The most important distinguishing features of a telephone cord are:

  • cord typically has flat body, relatively thin compared to a network cable
  • cord has small and narrow connecting head as compared to network cable

  • cord only has 4 copper "teeth" or metallic connecting surfaces, network cables have 8

  • cord will be loose and not "snap" in when plugged into a network port due to size difference.  Cord will be easily removed if pulled by hand.

4

 

A common network port is pictured below.  This particular one is located in the central library, room 102.  The faceplate number is designated as 102-7 for "Room 102, Port 7".  Since there are two connections available these are sub-named port 102-7A and port 102-7B.

5

Question: What happens if my ResNet connection isn't working?

If you suspect that your ResNet connection is not functional:

  1. Visit the ResNet Testing web page and familiarize yourself with the documents that correspond to your particular operating system.  It would be a good idea to view and print these pages for reference from an OIT computer lab.
  2. Contact the OIT Help Desk.  The Help Desk will try to assist you with whatever questions you have regarding any documentation found for ResNet In order to understand certain terminology, you should be able to identify some basic parts involved in establishing a ResNet connection.  Click here for help with identification.
  3. Due to the many different configurations found on privately own computers, troubleshooting a ResNet connection over the phone is very difficult if not impossible. 

ResNet Connection Testing Overview:

  • Using a known working laptop and Ethernet cable, the technician will attempt to pull a valid IP address from the DHCP server and establish a connection.

    • Connection Establish - Your ResNet port is functioning properly, the problem resides with your computer.

    • Connection Failed - There may be campus network trouble or trouble with campus network hardware.

If your network port is functioning properly a technician will attempt to reconfigure your software should some settings need to be corrected.  Anything beyond simple reconfiguration is the responsibility of the user, not OIT.  We are responsible for insuring that our equipment functions properly.  That includes the campus network and network ports.  We are not and will not be held responsible for your privately owned computer.

If your network port is not functioning, Network Services may have to perform further tests and possibly initiate repairs.