Research Activities in the UTA Social Interaction Lab

Social Interaction Lab

 

 

ickessil

William Ickes is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington. He is a coeditor of the three-volume series New Directions in Attribution Research and the author of Everyday Mind Reading (2003) and Strangers in a Strange Lab (2009). His research on empathic accuracy has received three international research awards.  

 

Current Graduate Students

 

 

megansil

Meghan Babcock is a third-year doctoral student in the Social Interaction Lab.  Her primary research interests include: individual differences, interpersonal relationships, attraction, and semantic similarity in dyadic interactions.

 

Publications

Babcock, M. J., Ta, V. P., & Ickes, W. (in press). Latent semantic similarity and language style matching in initial dyadic interactions. Journal of Language and Social Psychology.

Babcock, M. J., Park, A., & Ickes, W. (in press). Identifying hotheads: Measuring affect intensity for anger and frustration.  Chapter to appear in the forthcoming volume, Psychology of Anger: New Research to be published by Nova Science Publishers.

Babcock, M. J., & Ickes, W. (2013). Wait—and then keep on waiting! Validation of the affect intensity for anger and frustration scale.  Manuscript submitted for publication.

 

 

annasil

Anna Park is a fifth year student in the Social Interaction Lab. She has had a variety of research interests, but has more recently focused on aggressive personality traits as well as self and identity. Her dissertation project will focus on the psychological benefits incurred to new volunteers in community service.

 

Publications

Park, A., Ickes, W., & Robinson, R. L. (in press). More F#!%ing Rudeness: Reliable predictors of ugly confrontational behavior. Journal of Aggression, Conflict, and Peace Research.

Babcock, M. J., Park, A., & Ickes, W. (in press). Identifying hotheads: Measuring affect intensity for anger and frustration.  Chapter to appear in the forthcoming volume, Psychology of Anger: New Research to be published by Nova Science Publishers.

Ickes, W., Park, A., & Robinson, R. L. (2012). F#!%ing Rudeness:  Predicting the propensity to verbally abuse strangers. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 31, 75-94.

Ickes, W., Park, A., & A. Johnson.  (2012). Exploring the links between strength of sense of self  and identity status. Self and Identity, 11, 531-544.

Dugosh, J., Cheng, W., & Park, A. (2011). Adult attachment styles and motivated accuracy. In J. L. Smith, W. Ickes, and J. A. Hall (Eds.), Managing Interpersonal Sensitivity: Knowing When and When Not to Understand Others (pp. 125-142). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Park, A., Sharp, N., & Ickes. W. (2010). Social anxiety is contagious. In T.M. Robinson (Ed.), Social anxiety: Symptoms, causes, and techniques (pp. 79-91). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Green, R., Allbritten, A., & Park, A. (2008). Prevalence of careers in psychology courses at American Universities, The College Student Journal, 42, 238-240.

 

Park, A., & Henley, T. (2007) Personality and fantasy game character preferences. Imagination, Cognition, and Personality, 27, 37-46.

 

 

 

rebeccasil

Rebecca L. Robinson is a doctoral student in the Social Interaction Lab at UTA. Her research interests include social cognition, attitudes, and individual differences. Her primary research has focused on investigating the differences in the magnitude and effects of cognitive dissonance involving various types of attitudes.

 

Publications

Park, A., & Robinson, R. L., & Ickes, W. (2013). More f#!%ing rudeness:  Reliable personality predictors of  verbal rudeness and other ugly confrontational behaviors.  Manuscript submitted for publication.

Robinson, R. L., Navea, R., & Ickes, W. (2013). Predicting final course performance from students' written self-introductions: A LIWC analysis. Journal of Language and Social Psychology. doi: 10.1177/0261927X13476869

Cuperman, R., Robinson, R. L., & Ickes, W. (2012). On the malleability of self-image in individuals with a weak sense of self. Self and Identity, doi:10.1080/15298868.2012.726764

Ickes, W., Park, A., & Robinson, R. L. (2012). F#!%ing rudeness: Predicting the propensity to verbally abuse strangers. Journal of Language & Social Psychology, 31(1), 75–94.

Robinson, R. L. (2011). Embeddedness versus isolation in dissonance- induced attitude change. (Master’s thesis). ProQuest document ID: 896956568

 

 

 

ericsil

Eric Russell received his BS in Psychology from Texas Christian University and is a first year graduate student in the Social Interaction Lab at UT Arlington. His research interests include close relationships (specifically those in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population), friendships, mate attraction, mating strategies, evolutionary psychology, and personality psychology. Specifically, Eric has pioneered experimental research regarding the relationship between gay men and straight women. Visit his research blog at www.gaystraight.com

 

Publications

Lewis, D.M.G., Al-Shawaf, L., Russell, E. M., & Buss, D. M. (in press). Friends and happiness: An evolutionary perspective on friendship. In M. Demir (Ed.), Friendship and Happiness. Springer.

Russell, E. M., DelPriore, D. J., Butterfield, M. E., & Hill, S. E. (2013). Friends with benefits, but without the sex: Straight women and gay men exchange trustworthy mating advice. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 132-147.

 

 

 

viviansil

Vivian Ta received her BA in psychology at the University of Texas at Arlington in 2012 and is currently a first year graduate student.  Her research is primarily on latent semantic similarity in dyadic interactions in both friends and strangers.  As a former Miss Texas United America, she is also conducting research on the effects of beauty pageant competitions on self-esteem and sense of self in women.   Other topics she is interested in are attraction, evolutionary psychology, and personality.

 

Publications

Babcock, M.J., Ta, V.P., & Ickes, W.  Latent semantic similarity and language style matching in initial dyadic interactions. Journal of Language and Social Psychology. Pre-published August, 5, 2013. DOI: 10.1177/0261927X13499331

 

 

 

jarrydsil

Jarryd Wills is a 3rd year doctoral student, a Social Psychology instructor, Public Relations Director for UTA's Graduate Student Senate, and a Huffington Post blogger.  His applied social research focuses on Intergroup Compromise and Political Psychology.  He’s interested in applied social research that focuses on social inequities, factors that augment and attenuate victimization (e.g., parents who disown/support their LGBT child when they ‘come-out’), and is proactive in addressing social justice concerns. He believes social research should have some relevance to the interpersonal, social-cognitive mechanisms that directly affect people’s lives, that speaks to the costs of social inequities, and the benefits of promoting social change and enhancing well-being.

 

Publications:

Willis, J. (Accepted, in press).  Interpersonal partner preference differences across sexual orientation and gender. Journal of Personal Relationships

Osman, A., Willis, J., Crabtree, M., Norizuki, T., Emmerich, A., & Riske, B. (2011).  Reliability and validity of the state-trait anger expression inventory-2 (STAXI-2) in adolescent psychiatric inpatient samples.  In F. Columbus (Ed.), Psychology of Anger: Symptoms, Causes, and Coping (pp. 159-177).  New York: Nova Science Publishers. 

 


Links to Social Interaction Resources

Contacts:

  • Phone 817.272.2281
    Fax 817.272.2364

Address:

Department of Psychology, Box 19528, Arlington, Texas 76019
Questions about this site? Email: lazo@uta.edu

 

 

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