UTA College of Nursing & Health Innovation Researchers

 

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Dr. Paul Fdel

Dr. Paul Fadel

My research program is focused on the investigation of neural control of the circulation at rest and during exercise in human health and disease with a specific emphasis on the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system. We routinely obtain direct measures of sympathetic neural firing using the technique of microneurography. This measurement allows for the assessment of moment-to-moment, as well as long-term changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). A primary interest is the impact of this sympathetic firing on blood pressure and the peripheral vasculature. For the latter, we use Doppler ultrasound to obtain beat-to-beat measures of blood flow. Ongoing studies involve assessing sympathetic and vascular responses during various physiological manipulations including isometric and aerobic forms of exercise, lower body negative pressure, to simulate the effect of gravity when one stands up, and infusions of pharmacological agents. Studies are performed on normal healthy young and older subjects as well as patients with various pathophysiological conditions, such as, Type 2 Diabetes, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Along with the sympathetic control of the circulation, we also have an interest in endothelial vascular function for which we use the technique of flow mediated dilation as well as measures of endothelial microparticles. A particular area of interest is studying the underlying mechanisms contributing to sympathetic overactivity and impaired vascular function known to be present in aging and many disease states. The goal is to identify targets for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at minimizing and protecting against the deleterious consequence of high sympathetic outflow and vascular dysfunction.


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Dr. Robert Matthew Brothers

Dr. Robert Matthew Brothers

The primary focus of the Integrative Vascular Physiology Laboratory is in the investigation of mechanisms of impaired autonomic and vascular function in selected at-risk/diseased populations. This research bears implications for various physiologic conditions including thermoregulatory capacity, orthostatic tolerance, and risk for cardiovascular, neurological, and metabolic diseases. Responses to a variety of environmental conditions and interventions are utilized to investigate the impact of impairments on physiological function in at-risk/diseased populations.

 

 

 

 


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Dr. Mark Haykowsky

 

Dr. Mark Haykowsky

Is a Professor and Inaugural Moritz Chair in Geriatrics in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at The University of Texas at Arlington. Professor Haykowsky’s research program examines: (1) the biologic mechanisms responsible for the decline in health related physical fitness across the heart failure continuum, and the role of exercise training to improve cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function; (2) the efficacy of exercise training to reverse chemotherapy and/or biological therapy mediated cardiotoxicity in women with breast cancer, and; (3) cardiac mechanics and left ventricular (LV) remodeling in athletes.

 

 

 

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Dr. Michael Douglas Nelson

 

Dr. Michael Douglas Nelson

Is an Assistant Professor in Kinesiology at the University of Texas at Arlington. He holds adjunct membership in the Department of Bioengineering at UT Arlington, and is a Visiting Faculty Scientist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA. Dr. Nelson has a broad background in integrative human physiology, with particular research interests in: (1) cardiac mechanics and ventricular function; (2) the cardio-metabolic syndrome, and (3) vascular regulation and neurovascular coupling.

 

 

 

 

 

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Dr. Priscila M. Cacola

 

Dr. Priscila M.Cacola

Dr. Cacola’s research focuses on the links between cognitive and motor behavior across the lifespan, with particular emphasis on how motor and space representations develop and how problems associated with those representations cause motor skill difficulties in vulnerable populations (e.g., children with low motor ability and the elderly). She is also particularly interested in how the environment contributes to motor skill development in infants. Her work has significant practical implications for the development of screening, diagnostic, and intervention protocols associated with motor skills and vulnerable populations.

 

 

 

 

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Dr. Marco Brptto

Dr. Marco Brotto

My lab has demonstrated that muscle aging was associated with segregated intracellular Ca2+ release, compromised in aged skeletal muscle fibers, and contributes to sarcopenia. More recently, our basic research studies have led to a paradigm, shifting ideas about how bone and muscles communicate to each other biochemically and influence each other’s optimal function. We were the first group to propose the identification of serum biomarkers for the risk of falls and exercise efficiency in older adults.

 

 

 

 

 

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Dr. Kathryn Daniel

Dr. Kathryn Daniel

Much of my research focuses on frail, elderly adults and the technology applications, such as a laboratory apartment which is a prototype environment with sensor technology embedded within it, to support independence and safety in this population. I also collect data and look at factors associated with patient satisfaction in frail elderly house calls patients.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dr. David Keller

Dr. David Keller

My primary research interest is cardiovascular physiology. Publications in this area have examined topics such as: arterial baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure, sympathetic neural control of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise and dynamic blood pressure control mechanisms in health and disease. My most recent projects include: dynamic blood pressure control in African Americans, exercise-thermoregulation following prolonged exposure to simulated Lunar gravity and baroreflex function in patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

 

 

 

 

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Dr. Mark Ricard

Dr. Mark Ricard

The focus of my research is to improve human health by investigating the effects of joint moments and forces acting on the human body and how joint moments and forces can be modified to minimize the likelihood of injury or induce positive health outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dr. Cynthia Trowbridge

Dr. Cynthia Trowbridge

The foci of my research are tissue temperature and/or muscle responses to superficial/deep heating and cooling modalities and patterned electrical nerve stimulation, sports concussion, knee osteoarthritis (OA) outcome scales and biomechanical measures of dysfunction associated with knee OA, prevention and treatment/rehabilitation of injuries involving OA or muscle imbalances, and biomechanics and fatigue associated with the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

 


 

 

Dr. Rhonda Prisby

Dr. Rhonda Prisby

Iis an Associate Professor in Kinesiology, Director of the Bone Vascular and Microcirculation Laboratory, and an adjunct faculty in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Prisby’s lab investigates how microvascular (i.e., small resistance blood vessels) function or dysfunction contributes to bone health and disease.  The Bone Vascular and Microcirculation Laboratory uses a variety of techniques to investigate the integrative communication between blood vessels and bone. These techniques include assessing blood vessel function, perfusion of the vascular system to visualize bone blood vessels, cannulation of blood vessels and bone to determine arterial and intramedullary pressure, in vivo rodent surgical techniques, immunohistochemistry, cell culture, bone histomorphometry, and microcomputed tomography. Ongoing studies include utilizing the in vitro isolated microvessel technique to assess vasodilator and vasoconstrictor mechanisms of blood vessels from bone and bone marrow as a function of advancing age and/or intervention (e.g., parathyroid hormone treatment, bone marrow ablation, etc.). Additionally, the concurrent effects of these manipulations on bone are examined. By use of microcomputed tomography and bone histomorphometry, the alterations in vascular function with advancing age and/or treatment are determined in relation to bone mass and bone static and dynamic properties. The goals of these studies are to elucidate the mechanisms by which the vascular system influences bone and to identify therapeutic approaches aimed at the vascular system in the treatment of bone disease and fracture repair.