Online Course Description

A Look at Evidence-Based Practice with Older Adults: Exploring Ethcial Issues

Course # GER 8005
Instructor: Patrica Gleason-Wyn, LCSW, BSN, RN

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 ethic hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • to define evidence-based practice
  • to name and explain at least one (1) evidence-based practice model/program implemented nationally.
  • to articulate at least two (2) actual and potential ethcal concerns inherent in evidence-based practice models.


Brief Description: In recent past, our professional pratices, whether social work, nursing, health care administation, or other acillaray services, have been encouraged by corporate CEOs, funding sources, and our own professional oragnizations to implement evidence informed practice. What is evidence-based practice (EBP)? what is so great about evidence-infromed practice? What ethcial concerns are present in implemation of the EBP program guidelines? This simeinar will describe a number of nationally recognized and implemented EBP models untilized with older adults, and explore potential ethical issues inherent in EBP programs that may challenge the practioner.

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Introduction to Clinical Supervision

Course # SSW 052
Instructors: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours)of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description: An introduction to the field of clinical supervision for LCSWs and LPCs including: the evolution of supervision in psychology and social work; components of supervision; state Board requirements for supervision; developing the supervisory structure; and responsibilities of supervisors and supervisees.  

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A Social Worker’s Guide to Psychotherapeutic Medications

Course # SSW 004
Instructor: Bill Peters, Ph.D., LMSW-ACP, LPC 

DISCONTINUED

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe the current range of psychotherapeutic medications:
    • Names
    • Target symptoms
    • Effects
    • Side effects
    • Interactions
  • Understand the role, uses, and abuses of psychotherapeutic medications in treatment and management of mental and emotional disorders
  • Assist physicians and nurses with patient and family education on the psychotherapeutic medications


Topical Outline:

  • History of psychotherapeutic medications
  • Classification and description of psychotherapeutics (with emphasis on current and developing medications):
    • Antianxiety
    • Antidepressants
    • Antimanics
    • Antipsychotics
    • Miscellaneous
  • Role, uses, and abuses of psychotherapeutic medications in treatment and management of mental and emotional disorders
  • Implications for social work practice:
    • Importance of patient and family education
    • Medication compliance
    • Social worker’s role

Course Description:  This on-line course will provide the social worker with working knowledge of the psychotherapeutic medications, including medications used for anxiety, depression, bi-polar, and schizophrenia. Topics include: effects, side-effects, and interactions of medications; their role in treatment and management of mental and emotional disorders; issues in medication compliance; importance of patient and family education; and the impact of medications on social work services. An on-line bulletin board provides the opportunity for discussion of issues with the course instructors and other course participants.

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Ethics

Course # SSW 005
Instructor: Bill Peters, Ph.D., LMSW-ACP, LPC 

DISCONTINUED

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will:

  • Have reviewed current Texas social work licensing board rules on ethics and practice for their respective licensure, and understand their implications for practice.
  • Have reviewed their own values in comparison with professional values, and understood the implications for practice
  • Have experienced decision-making dilemmas in professional practice as related to application of ethical standards


Topical Outline:

  • Relationship of general values and ethics to professional values and ethics
  • Review of Texas social work state licensure board rules on ethics and practice
  • Conflict between personal and professional values and ethics, strategies for resolution
  • Conflict between professional values and ethics and those of employers and agencies
  • Specific applications and issues
    • Confidentiality
    • Dual relationships
    • Managed care
    • Client self-determination

Course Description:  This on-line course provides the participant with a review of the Texas social work licensure board ethical rules and standards of practice. The course emphasizes practical application of the rules and strategies for resolution of conflicts between professional ethical standards and personal and work standards. Specific applications and issues regarding confidentiality, dual relationships, managed care, client self-determination, and other areas will be included. An on-line bulletin board provides the opportunity for discussion of issues with the course instructor and other course participants.

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Developing Supervisory Structure and Core Supervisory Skills

Course # SSW 053
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW
 

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description:  This module includes: characteristics of successful supervisors; goals for supervision; supervisory roles; building trust; and professional competence that are applicable to LCSW and LPC.

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Supervisory Process and Regulations

Course # SSW 054
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description:  This module is applicable to both Clinical Social Workers and LPCs and includes: application of supervisory skills; effective communication; self-awareness; decision making; and a review of state regulations for LPC and SW. 

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Clinical Models of Supervision

Course # SSW 055
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW 

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description: This module discusses the various clinical models for supervision and also includes: therapeutic use of self and self-disclosure; intentional and un-intentional self-disclosure; responding to anger/hostility of clients and/or supervisees; and crisis management.  

 

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Ethics of Advocacy    (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 010   
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D. 

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand what different types of advocacy are
  • Understand why advocacy is important
  • Know how the NASW Code of Ethics and IRS regulations relate to advocacy by social workers
  • Name five advocacy myths and explain what the truth about advocacy is


Topical Outline:

  • Introduction
  • What is Advocacy
  • Why is Advocacy Important
  • Advocacy Myths
  • Things to be Careful About
  • Rules for Ethical Advocacy

Course Description: This on-line course examines the ethics of advocacy rather than the techniques of advocacy. You will learn what advocacy is, why it is important, and the truth about many advocacy myths. Information presented will help you work through ethical dilemmas that arise during this type of social work practice.

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Clinical and Supervisory Documentation

Course # SSW 060
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description:  Social work and LPC regulations relating to documentation including: ethical issues in documentation; privacy standards for client and supervisee records; teaching supervisees basic documentation skills; and documentation as risk management.  

Effective Evaluation of Supervisees

Course # SSW 061
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description:  Regulations for LPC and Social Work relating to evaluation: development of trust and realistic expectations about evaluation with supervisees; due process; evaluating professional competence; formative and summative evaluation; incompetence vs. impairment; handling the anxiety evoked by the evaluative process; and emotional responses of supervisees to the evaluation process.   

Ethical and Leagal Issues in Clnincal Supervision

Course # SSW 063
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description:  Laws and standards relating to supervision, history of licensing in social work and LPC, Texas social work Code of Conduct and LPC Code of Ethics; other Texas codes applicable to supervision; sexual misconduct; HIPAA; a review of the NASW and ACA Codes of Ethics relating to clinical practice; and  development of ethical standards for supervision.   

Ethics in Clinical Practice

Course # SSW 064
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description:  This module includes an informal review of the types of disciplinary actions taken against social workers and LPCs in Texas; typical developmental challenges in supervisees; establishment of an environment of trust and an effective structure for ethical practice; duty to warn, protect and/or report; and examples of other ethical challenges in client care.

Clinical and Supervisory Boundaries and Self-Care

Course # SSW 065
Instructor: Ellen Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of Ethics for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT and Clinical Supervision for LCSW and LPC.

Course Description:  This discussion includes ways to help supervisees develop effective personal and professional boundaries and: application of ethical standards to clinical practice (e.g. professional competence, inappropriate / inadequate treatment, and unprofessional behavior); dual roles in practice and supervision; developing effective supervisory boundaries;  compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma and burnout; and stress management.  

 

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Ethics of Social Work: Budgeting and Fundraising

Course #SSW 012
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Explain what the NASW Code of Ethics says about budgeting and resource acquisition.
  • Explain what the Association of Fundraising Executives' Code of Ethics says about ethical fundraising.
  • Explain why budgeting, resource acquisition and fundraising are important elements of ethical social work practice.
  • Understand and be able to apply Vinter & Kish's partitions schema.
  • Understand and be able to apply Kirst-Ashmon & Hull's approach to ethical decision-making to examples provided.


Topical Outline:

  • The importance of budgeting and resource acquisition.
  • The six processes of budgeting.
  • The ethical mandates concerning budgeting and fundraising (NASW's and National Association of Fundraising Executives' Codes of Ethics)
  • Ethical budget cutting.
  • Ethical decision-making.
  • Examples of budgeting ethical dilemmas.

Course Description:  In an era of decreasing resources for human services and increasing needs, social workers at all levels in agencies need to understand the ethical implications of decisions about budgeting and resource acquisition. This course brings to the forefront questions such as “What does budgeting have to do with ethics?” “How can fundraising be done ethically?” and “If we have to trim the budget, what should stay and what should go?”

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Stress Management

Course # SSW 013
Instructor: Rick Hoefer, Ph.D. and Catheleen Jordan, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • define different types of stress (distress and eustress)
  • understand the stages in the process of "burnout out"
  • describe the symptoms and disorders associated with stress
  • explain some of the factors associated with differential feelings of stress
  • understand the difference between stress management and stress reduction
  • know and be able to apply several strategies for stress management and stress reduction


Topical Outline:

  • Stages of "stressing"
  • Stress reactions
  • Physical symptoms and stress-linked physical disorders
  • Emotional symptoms and stress-linked emotional disorders
  • Behavioral symptoms of stress and stress-linked behavioral disorders
  • Cognitive symptoms of stress
  • Appraising stressors
  • Attitudes with high risk of burnout
  • Stress management vs. reduction
  • Benefits of improved stress management
  • Measuring stress
  • What is personal stress?
  • What is child and home stress?
  • What is partner stress?
  • What is stress at work?
  • Work-life balance
  • Solutions: Stress at work

Brief Description:  This course is designed for the busy professional who either feels overloaded or works with clients who feel "stressed out." It presents some theoretical information about stress and many suggestions for how to actually manage the stress in one's life. It also provides a list of other resources. This information may be as useful for your clients as for yourself, though it is primarily aimed at assisting your personal growth.

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Helping Clients Change: A Transtheoretical Approach

Course # SSW 014
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Define and describe the six stages of change
  • Be able to assess a person to know which of the six stages of change is being experienced
  • Describe the nine processes of change
  • Describe for which stage of change each of the nine processes of change is best used

Topical Outline:

Brief Description: Designed for the professional who wants to understand better how clients change. Learn the best approaches for facilitating and supporting client change. Content includes the “Stages of Change Model” developed by Prochaska, Norcross and DiClemente for understanding when and how change in clients takes place. This information if important for everyone who helps other people change for the better

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Introduction to Fundraising

Course # SSW 015
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours)for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Be aware of the larger context of individual agency fundraising and be able to articulate how these trends may affect her/his fundraising efforts;
  • Know what a case statement is and what its key components are;
  • Write a draft case statement for circulation within her/his agency and its board; and
  • Be prepared for the next online course in this series.

Topical Outline:

Brief Description:  This online course covers two of the basics of fundraising. The first part is understanding the larger context in which your fundraising efforts are being conducted. Being aware of current trends in funding and fundraising ( and being able to apply them to your agency) will help you be more successful in charting the waters around you.  The second part of this online course covers the case statement—what it is and how it is the foundation for all fundraising efforts your agency conducts

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Fundraising II: Creating the Fundraising Plan

Course # SSW 016
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

PREREQUISITE: Introduction to Fundraising (SSW 015)

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the elements of a fundraising plan;
  • Choose the most appropriate vehicle for her/his organization;
  • Have a beginning understanding of how to implement the fundraising plan and all of its elements; and
  • Be prepared for the next online course in this series

Topical Outline:

Brief Description:  Building on the information about the case plan in the Introduction to Fundraising online course, this course moves to the next step: creating a fundraising plan. By examining the goals and needs of the fundraising effort, this course shows how to choose the correct vehicles and explores the major types of fundraising efforts; annual campaigns, major gifts, capital campaigns, planned giving, special events, corporate contributions, grantwriting to foundations and grantwriting to government.

 

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Fundraising III: Grantwriting

Course # SSW 017
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

PREREQUISITE: Introduction to Fundraising (SSW 015) & Fundraising II: Creating the Fundraising Plan (SSW 016)

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the similarities and differences between writing a grant to a foundation and to a government agency;
  • Know the elements of almost all grant applications;
  • Research a potential grant source to ensure compatibility with program goals and objectives; and
  • Have the knowledge to put together a draft grant proposal.

Topical Outline:

Brief Description:  One of the most common ways for human service organizations to raise large amounts of funds is through grantwriting to foundations and government agencies. This online course, which is the third in a series, presents information on the details of writing a successful grant.

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The Ethics of Program Evaluation

Course # SSW 018
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for SWA, LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the National Association of Social Workers' Codes of Ethics relating to program evaluation;
  • Explain what the American Evaluation Association's Code of Ethics says about ethical evaluation;
  • Explain why program evaluation and research are important elements of ethical social work practice; and
  • Understand and be able to apply Kirst-Ashmon & Hull's approach to ethical decision-making to examples provided.


Topical Outline:

  • The importance of program evaluation and research.
  • What are the ethical mandates concerning evaluation and research? (NASW's and American Evaluation Association's Codes of Ethics)
  • What is ethical evaluation?
  • What is "ethical decision-making"?
  • What are some examples of evaluation ethical dilemmas?

Brief Description: Program evaluation, as a tool of accountability, is increasingly becoming a requirement for all human service programs. In addition, greater calls for client protection against unethical evaluation and research have been made in recent years. Thus, while more programs are being called upon to conduct evaluations, the conduct of evaluations has been made more difficult by having tighter restrictions on how it can be conducted.

Agencies must therefore do evaluations in a way that does not put clients at risk. This online course, while not legal advice, will assist program staff to plan and conduct ethical evaluation and research to remain accountable to stakeholders while doing what is necessary to protect their clients from harm.

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Ethics In Action:  A Model For the Thoughtful Social Worker

Course # SSW 019
Instructor: Catheleen Jordan, Ph.D. and Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Understand the assumptions of major theories used in social work;
  • Understand the practice and ethical implications of these theories;
  • Develop a thoughtful model for one's practice.


Topical Outline:

  • Overview of the course and course objectives
  • Overview of theories used in social work 
  • Philosophical assumptions
  • Practice and ethical implications
  • Theoretical and methodological eclectism and critical thinking model

Brief Description:  This course aims to look at the ethical implications of commonly used theories in social work. First, social work theories--psychodynamics, cognitive-behavioral, and systems--are described. Next, each theory's underlying assumptions are discussed in terms of the practice and ethical implications. Some of these include important concerns such as social justice, ethics, and choice of methods. Finally, two conclusions for the ethical social work practitioner are drawn: (1) theoretical and methodological eclectism and (2) a critical thinking practice model.

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Blenders: The New Brady Bunch

Course # SSW 020
Instructor: Catheleen Jordan, Ph.D. and Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Define blenders; non-traditional families composed of parents and children connected by marriage or cohabitation rather than blood;
  • Understand the issues of blenders, for example dual-career paths, child-step/parent conflict;
  • Develop a model of practice to intervene in the special issues of this population.


Topical Outline:

  • Overview of the course and course objectives
  • Who are blenders?
    • How many are there?
  • What are the issues?
    • Composition
    • Tasks
    • Roles
  • What are the solutions?
    • Assessment tools
    • Psychoeducation

Brief Description:  This course aims to look at the new step-family; we call them "blenders". We will define this new family configuration, and then discuss some of their issues including difficulties due to family composition, tasks and roles. These may include sibling rivalry issues or child-step/parent conflict. We then review solutions for helping these "blenders" bond as a new and strong family unit. Methods include tools for assessment, as well as psychoeducational interventions such as conflict resolution and parent training.

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Ethics Between the Sexes (Video/Audio)                   

Course # SSW 024
Instructor: Rhonda Triana, LCSW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Recognize their own sexist biases
  • Increase awareness of institutionalized gender biases in the workplace
  • Understand how the Code of Ethics addresses sexism
  • Become attuned to differences in male/female communication and work styles
  • Develop strategies to protect against sexism in interactions with clients and co-workers


Topical Outline:

  • Overview of workplace sexism
    • Inequities in salary and career advacement
    • Gender biases involved in perceptions of competence, aggressiveness, and leadership
    • Historical timeline of womne in the workforce
    • Differences in male and female workplace "culture"
  • How the Code of Ethics addresses sexism
    • Professional values
    • Responsibilities to the profession
    • Responsibilities to colleagues
    • Responsibilities to clients
    • Responsibilities to society
    • Self-assessment of biases
  • Strategies for optimizing same-gender and cross gender working relationships
    • Women working with women
    • Men working with men
    • Women and men working together

Brief DescriptionEthics between the Sexes explores why gender-bias is an issue of particular importance to human service professionals. In relationships with clients, co-workers, administrators, and supervisees, we are ethically compelled to guard against gender bias through examining how the Code of Ethics addresses sexism, male and female human service professionals, clients, and co-workers.

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Planning Advocacy for Social Justice

Course # SSW 025
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Articulate the definition of three different versions of "social justice";
  • Understand the variables that affect participation in advocacy efforts;
  • Plan an advocacy effort, including understanding an issue;
  • Develop an advocacy map to guide their future advocacy efforts.


Topical Outline:

  • Overview of the course and course objectives
  • What is "Advocacy for Social Justice"?
  • What is "Advocacy "?
  • What is "Social Justice"?
    • Utilitarian Social Justice
    • Libertarian Social Justice
    • Egalitarian Social Justice
    • Social Justice
  • The Advocacy Process Steps in the Advocacy Process
    • Getting Involved
    • Understanding the Issue
    • Planning
    • Advocating
    • Evaluating
    • Ongoing Monitoring

Brief Description:  This course helps you to plan your advocacy efforts, whether on behalf of one client or a large group or social cause. Explore the concept of advocacy for social justice and how to be prepared for a serious effort at changing the world for the better.

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Conducting Advocacy for Social Justice

Course # SSW 026
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Know how to negotiate and use empirically-based persuasion techniques;
  • Develop a credible message to send to a particular receiver as a part of an advocacy effort.


Topical Outline:

  • Overview of the course and course objectives
  • Negotiation
  • Persuasion
  • Presenting information and presents a skill-building exercise.

Brief Description: This workshop helps you to learn to implement and evaluate an advocacy effort, including trying to influence the legislative and executive branches of government, as well as other targets of advocacy. While taking this course "Planning Advocacy for Social Justice" is not required, this course assumes you are familiar with the material in that course.

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Beyond the ABC's of Ethics: Things You May Not Have Learned in School  (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 027                                                               
Instructor: Ellen J. Elliston, Ph.D., LCSW, CDVC

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • List an example of a dilemma that could arise in everyday practice.
  • Discuss the importance of personal and professional boundaries
  • Evaluate his/her own ethical belief system that could affect social work practice


Topical Outline:

  • Discussion of basics for ethical decision making
    • Recognition of an ethical dilemma
    • Review of social work regulations and code of ethics that relate to examples used in the presentation
  • Recognizing the personal responsibility of decision making and personal and professional boundaries
    • Acknowledging how we feel about issues such as confidentiality, boundaries and professional behavior
  • Identifying how this relates to professional behavior on teams
    • Recognizing personal style that may not fit our ethical guidelines
    • Acknowledging any behavior that may interfere with ethical practice
  • Improving decision making
    • Learning to identify the dilemma to be addressed
    • Steps to take to resolve the dilemma

Brief Description:

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Basic Concepts of Nonprofit Leadership  (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 030                                                                            NEW
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to define "leadership".
  • Participants will be able to describe the purposes of nonprofit leadership.       
  • Participants will be able to describe the following leadership eheories:
    • Trait
    • Authoritarian, democratic and laissez-faire leadership
    • Transformational leadership
    • Servant leadership
    • Organizational situation-specific leadership
  • Participants will be able to understand what research suggests are the basic skills of nonprofit and human service leadership.   
  • Participants will be able to understand and apply the 4-Quadrant Model described in the course.


Topical Outline:

  • Introduction
  • What is Leadership?
  • What are Nonprofit Leadership skills to be used for?
  • Leadership Theories
    • Trait theory
    • Authoritarian, democratic and laissez-faire (Lewin, Lippitt & White, 1939)
    • Transformational (Burns, 1978) and servant leadership (Greenlead, 1970)
    • Organizational situation-specific (Schmid, 2006)
  • What are the basic skills of Nonprofit Leadership?
    • Working with the board
    • Leadership skills at different levels of an organization
    • Studies of what social work managers do and should know
  • Putting it all together

 

Brief Description: Leadership in nonprofit organizations is not just for the Executive Director! Studies show that most social workers are promoted into leadership positions. Everyone, from the newest case manager to the "person in charge," can be more effective by learning what the basic concepts of nonprofit leadership are. This course describes aqnd develops an approach to leadership based on empirical literature about what individual managers do and the different contexts that organizations operate in. The material can be used by anyone to strengthen their understanding of how to lead from their own position and to assist their agency to match appropriate leadership skills to organizational needs.

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Assessing Levels of Moral Development      (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 031                                                                           
Instructor: Beverly M. Black, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to explain the two prominent theories of moral development (Kohlberg and Gilligan).
  • Participants will discuss how the theories were developed.
  • Participants will assess the strengths and weaknesses of each theory.
  • Participants will discuss the theories' applications to social work assessment and social work practice.


Topical Outline:

  • Moral Development Theories
  • Theoretical Historical Context
  • Kohlberg's Theory of Moral Development
    • Levels of development
    • Description and examples
    • Critique
  • Gilligan's Theory of Moral Development
    • Levels and transitions of development
    • Descriptions and examples
    • Critique
  • Application of theories to Social Work practice
    • Assessment
    • Interventions


Brief Description
: As the values, norms and morality of society appear to be changing, it is important that we revisit the theories of moral development. How do people develop their sense of what is right and wrong? How can social workers use theories of moral development to work with clients? These topics will be addressed in this course.

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Human Behavior Theories and Social Work Ethics

Course # SSW 032                                                                            COMING SOON
Instructor: Beverly M. Black, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to assess the following human behavior theories consistency with social work values and ethics
    • systems theory
    • ecological perspective
    • feminist theory
    • empowerment theory
    • psychodynamic theory
    • conflict theory
    • symbolic interactionism
    • social constructionism
    • transpersonal theory
    • social learning theory


Topical Outline:

  • Systems Based Theories
    • structural functionalism
    • general systems
    • ecological
  • Historical Context
  • Key Concepts
    • adaptation
    • interdependent
  • Structural Functionalism
    • adaptation
    • goal attainment
    • integration
    • latency
    • critical analysis
    • application to social work practice
  • General Systems
    • open systems
    • closed systems
    • social systems
    • key concepts
    • critical analysis
    • application to social work practice
  • Ecological Perspective
    • sense of competence
    • coping
    • life stress
    • relatedness
    • goodness of fit
    • life model
    • critical analysis
    • application to social work practice


Brief Description
: System-based theories are the foundation of social work education and much of social work practice. This course provides an in-depth review of structural functionalism, general systems theory and the ecological perspective and addresses how their key concepts can be applied to social work practice.

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Creating a Dating Violence Prevention Program: How Will You Do It?     (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 033                                                 
Instructor: Beverly M. Black, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to discuss the importance of primary prevention of dating violence and sexual assault
  • Participants will be able to explain the major considerations that are needed to be addressed when developing a dating violence and sexual assault prevention program including:
    • identify the theoretical frameworks that guide programs
    • program goals
    • recruitment of program settings
    • membership issues
    • structure of program
    • program content
    • peer education
    • involvement of school personnel, parents and community resources
    • program evaluation
    • qualities of program facilitators
    • rewards and challenges of prevention programming


Topical Outline:

  • Importance of primary prevention
  • Theoretical considerations
    • social learning theory
    • feminist theory
    • empowerment theory
  • Program goals
    • prevention versus risk-reduction
    • knowledge
    • attitudes
    • behavior
    • individual versus society level
  • Recruitment of program settings
    • schools
    • community agencies
  • Membership
    • same-and mixed-gender programming
    • age range
    • group size
  • Structure
    • program length and session spacing
    • presentation techniques
  • Program Content
    • relevant topics
    • diversity issues
    • curriculum development
  • Peer leadership
    • peer education
    • youth advisory boards
    • peer counseling
    • recruitment and training of peer leaders
    • challenges in peer leadership
  • Parental, school staff, and community involvement
    • parent involvement and its challenges
    • school staff involvement
    • community involvement
  • Evaluation of prevention program
    • evaluation mechanisms
    • evaluation content
    • evaluation challenges
  • Qualities of ideal prevention educators
    • diversity
    • youth culture
    • trustworthy
    • experiences and training
  • Rewarding, troubling and challenging aspects
    • making a difference
    • working with youth
    • ineffective systemic responses
    • hostile audiences
    • disclosure of victimization


Brief Description
: With reports of 30%-50% of adolescents involved in violent relationships, more prevention programming is being developed to address the startling figures. This couse focuses on how to develop a dating violence prevention program including issues related to goals, setting of the program, length, group composition, curriculum, peer education, diversity, involvement of families and communities, evaluation, challenges and rewards.

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Transpersonal Theory for Social Work Practice

Course # SSW 034                                                                           
Instructor: Beverly M. Black, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to explain what transpersonal theories are
  • Participants will discuss the historical roots of transpersonal theory
  • Participants will learn to identify the major transpersonal theories and their application to social work practice
  • Participants will be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using transpersonal theories in social work practice   
  • Participants will be able to assess when and how the use of transpersonal theories may be most appropriate in social work practice


Topical Outline:

  • What is transpersonal theory?
  • Historical development of transpersonal theories
  • Humanistic/Existential theories
    • Jung
    • Maslow
    • Rogers
    • Fromm
    • conditions for effective therapeutic relationships
  • Transpersonal
    • Fowler
      • stages of faith development
      • critique of theory
      • application to social work practice
    • Wilber
      • spectrum of human development
      • transpersonal stages of development
      • critique of theory
      • application to social work practice
  • Controversies in the use of transpersonal theories in social work practice


Brief Description
: The uses of transpersonal theories are becoming more prominent in social work practice. This course will focus on gaining an understanding of prominent transpersonal theories and their application to social work practice. Issues surrounding the controversies of the use of transpersonal theories will be included.

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Feminist Theory and Social Work Practice                  (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 035                                                      
Instructor: Beverly M. Black, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to explain feminist theory
  • Participants will discuss the historical roots of feminist theory
  • Participants will discuss the major feminist theories and their application to social work practice
  • Participants will be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using feminist theories in social work practice
  • Participants will be able to assess how feminist social work practice can be applied to your own social work practice


Topical Outline:

  • Feminist theory as an empowerment theory
  • Historical Context
  • Key Concepts
    • power
    • stratification
    • critical consciousness
  • Feminist theories and application to social work practice
    • psychoanalytic feminism
    • radical feminism theory
    • socialist feminist theory
    • liberal feminism theory
    • lesbian feminist theory
    • ecofeminist theory
    • postmodern feminist theory
    • global feminism
  • Feminist ideological themes
  • Feminist social work practice
    • what does it look like?
    • critique
    • challenges


Brief Description
: Many social workers are committed to practicing social work from a feminist perspective. This course will focus on gaining an understanding of feminist theory and its application to feminist social work practice. The challenges facing feminist social work practice will be included.

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Adolescent Dating Violence and Adult Responses    (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 036                                                     
Instructor: Beverly M. Black, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to identify the factors associated with adolescent dating violence and the warning signs of relationship violence
  • Participants will be able to explain how adolescent commonly respond to relationship violence and discuss the consequences of their actions
  • Participants will be able to explain how culture and gender play a role in adolescent dating violence and the responses to it
  • Participants will discuss the actions that parents and adults can take to prevent/reduce risk of dating violence among youths   
  • Participants will be able to explain how best to respond to adolescents when they make a disclosure to dating violence
  • Participants will be able to assess the benefits and drawbacks of bystanders intervening in adolescent dating violence


Topical Outline:

  • Prevalence of adolescent dating violence and problems associated with it
  • Myths of dating violence
  • Warning signs of dating violence
    • jealousy
    • controlling behavior
    • unrealistic expectations
    • blaming others
  • Adolescent response to dating violence
    • talking about dating violence
      • talk with nobody
      • talk with friends
      • talk when someone sees the violence
      • talk with attached angry/jealous meaning to incident
    • why youth don't talk
    • consequence of talking
      • greater victimization when talk with friends-girls
      • greater perpetration when talk with friends-boys
      • less perpetration when talk with female adult-boys
  • What parents can do to prevent/reduce risk of dating violence
    • address gender issues
    • taking young relationships seriously
    • know warning signs and educate others about warning signs
    • establish guidelines for dating
    • resouces of dating violence
    • teach healthy relationships
  • Bystander intervention
    • how to intervene
    • how to assess risk in intervening


Brief Description
: Despite the prevalence of dating violence and psychological impact on adolescents, youth rarely turn to their parents or other adults for help with dating violence victimization. Thus, many parents and caregivers are unaware of the relationship violence in their children's lives and lack the knowledge of how best to help them.

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Systems-Based Theories and Social Work Practicece    (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 037                                                     
Instructor: Beverly M. Black, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to identify the key concepts of system-based theories
  • Participants will be able to discuss structural functionalism and its application to social work practice
  • Participants will be able to discuss general systems and its application to social work practice
  • Participants will discuss ecological perspective and its application to social work practice   
  • Participants will be able to critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of system-based theories and their application for social work practice


Topical Outline:

  • Systems Based Theories
    • Structural Functionalism
    • General Systems
    • Ecological
  • Historical Context
  • Key Concepts
    • Adaptation
    • Interdependent
  • Structural Functionalism
    • Adaptation
    • Goal attainment
    • Integration
    • Latency
    • Critical analysis
    • Application to social work practice
  • General Systems
    • Open systems
    • Closed systems
    • Social systems
    • Key concepts
    • Critical analysis
    • Application to social work practice
  • Ecological Perspective
    • Sense of competence
    • Coping
    • Life stress
    • Relatedness
    • Goodness of fit
    • Life model
    • Critical analysis
    • Application to social work practice


Brief Description
: System-based theories are the foundation of social work education and much of social work practice. This course provides an in-depth review of structural functionalism, general systems theory and the ecological perspective and addresses how their key concepts can be applied to social work practice.

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Making Better Decisions    (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 038                                                     
Instructor: Richard Hoefer, Ph.D.

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to describe the origin in Western Philosophical tradition of the split betwem "emotion" and "reason"
  • Participants will be able to detail the aspects of brain chemistry that impact decision making presented in the course
  • Participants will be able to discuss what "behavioral economics" is and some of the insights it has generated about errors in decision making
  • Participants will be able to define and apply the following terms:
    • "Randomness"
    • "Loss aversion"
    • "Irrelevant anchoring"
    • "Limited working memory"   
  • Participants will be able to recall and apply several empirically supported methods for making better decisions


Topical Outline:

  • Introduction to decision-making
  • Philosophical foundations
  • Brain chemistry
  • Ways we make bad decisions
    • Randomness
    • Loss aversion
    • Irrelevant anchoring
    • Limited working memory
  • Making better decisions
  • Decision making flow chart


Brief Description
: If you could eliminate five to ten percent of all your bad decisions, you would be far ahead at work and in your personal life. This course is designed to provide you the information you need to make at least that much improvement. Insights from philosophy, brain chemistry studies and behavioral economics form the reseach base for this enjoyable course. If you understand and consistently follow the empirically-validated principles in this course and use the decision making flow chart consistently, you will make fewer mistakes.

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Suicide: An introduction to What It Is and How to Intervene    (Video/Audio)

Course # SSW 039                                                     
Instructor: Regina T. P. Aguirre, Ph.D., MSSW, BSW, BA, LMSW-AP             NEW

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to identify patterns in suicide in relation to demographic characteristics (e.g. age, sex, race, ethnicity, geographic location, mental illness)
  • Participants will be able to explain historical background of stigma of suicide
  • Participants will be able to explain two evidence based theories of suicide (i.e. Baumeister's Escape Theory and Joiner's Interpersonal Therapy)
  • Participants will be able to identify clinical clues that a person may be considering suicide
  • Participants will be able to evaluate level of risk for suicide
  • Participants will be able to identify proper avenues of treatment dependent upon person's level of risk for suicide


Topical Outline:

  • Suicide: What is it? A discussion of demographic patterns
  • Suicide: Why the stigma? A discussion of social justice issues and suicide
    • History of suicidal stigma
    • Stop perpetuating it!: Sensitive talk about suicide
  • Theories of suicide: Two evidence-based theories of why people die by suicide
    • Baumeister's Escape Theory
    • Joiner's Interpersonal Theory
  • Intervention  
    • Clues a client is suicidal
    • What to ask if a client is suicidal
    • Assessing risk to identify appropriate intervention
    • Planning and implementing the intervention


Brief Description
: Suicide is a pervasive social event that will touch the lives of most professionals in the social services at some point or another. The myths, misunderstandings, and stigmatization surrounding suicide make it difficult for individuals and families to seek help. Additionally, lack of training among many health and mental health professionals in a systematic method of risk assessment and intervention compounds the problem. In this course, you will learn the evidence-based theories of suicide, implications of language and culture in perpetuating stigma, and a systematic method of assessing and intervening to save lives.

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Suicide: How to Intervene with Stateside, Deployed, and Veteran Populations

Course # MIL 9000                  NEW                                   
Instructors: Regina T. P. Aguirre, Ph.D., MSW, BSW, BA, LMSW-AP and Warren N. Ponder, MSW, LMSW                   

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.

If you are part of the Military/Veteran Certificate Program, only the following are approved: LMSW, AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20120138)

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify patterns in suicide in relation to demographic characteristics within the military population (e.g. age, sex, race, ethnicity, geographic location, mental illness)
  • Explain historical background of stigma of suicide and mental illness, especially in the military
  • Explain the leading evidence based theory of suicide in the military (i.e. Joiner's Interpesonal Theory)
  • Identify clinical clues that a person may be considering suicide
  • Evaluate level of risk for suicide based upon the three potential situations (deployment, stateside, post-discharge)
  • Identify proper avenues of treatment dependent upon person's level of risk for suicide
  • Identify aspects of treatment related to the veterans family


Topical Outline:

  • Suicide: What is it? A discussion of demographic patterns within the military
  • Suicide and mental illness: Why the stigma? A discussion of social justice issues and suicide within a military context
    • History of suicidal stigma
    • History of mental illness stigma
    • Stop perpetuating it!: Sensitive talk about suicide
  • Theory of suicide: Leading evidence-based theory of why people in the military die by suicide: Joiner's Interpersonal Theory
  • Intervention with the service member and his or her family
    • Deployment situations
    • Stateside situations
    • Post-discharge from the military


Brief Description
: Suicide within the military population has been steadily increasing since the War on Terror began.  The myths, misunderstanding, barriers to care, stigmatization surrounding suicide and mental illness make it difficult for service members and their families to seek help.  Additionally, lack of training among many health care providers and mental health professionals in a systematic method of risk assessment and intervention compounds the problems.  In this seminar, you will learn the leading evidence-based theory of suicide among military service members, implications of language and culture in perpetuating stigma, and a systematic method of assessing and intervening to save lives.

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Marital Satisfaction and Managing Long-distance Relationships in the Military Family: Tips for Clinicians on the Home-front and Downrange

Course # MIL 9001                  NEW                                   
Instructors: Alexa Smith-Osborne, Ph.D., MSW, LCSW, ACSW, and Warren N. Ponder, MSW, LMSW                   

This course is approved for 0.6 CEUs (6 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT.    Approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) of ethics.

If you are part of the Military/Veteran Certificate Program, only the following are approved: LMSW, AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20120138)

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Explain how each PTSD cluster affects marital satisfaction and family relationships
  • Assess, intervene, and evaluate their process via standardized assessment instrument
  • Implement ethical interventions based upon empirical investigation of ways to communicate before, during, and after deployment


Topical Outline:

  • History of PTSD in the DSM
    • PTSD has been referred to as battle fatigue and shell shock up until WWII
    • PTSD became a diagnosis in 1980 (DSM III)
  • Different symptoms clusters and their specific impact on marriage
    • Re-experiencing
    • Avoidance
    • Emotional numbing
    • Hyper-arousal
  • Civilian divorce statistics since civil war (Sources: Pavalko, & Elder, (1990)
  • Military divorce rates since OIF/OEF
    • Karney and Crown (2007) study
    • Stress vs. selection hypothesis
    • Highlight that divorce rates are not the best way to measure marriages. relationship/marital satisfaction scales are a better way. Given military rules and regulations couples with current op tempo it can be logistically hard to get a divorce.
  • Treatment theories of Marital Satisfaction and the Resilient Military Family
    • Couple Adaptation to Traumatic Stress (Nelson Goff)
    • CBT - interpersonal (Monson)
    • Perceptions of significant other on marital satisfaction (Renshaw)
    • The Resiliency Model (McCubbin)
  • Prevention and Intervention: Family, couples, and individual
    • Intake
    • Intervention: Treatment and Prevention
    • Termination
  • Ethical issues
    • Social workers can encourage veterans and spouses to communicate frequently regardless of mode of communication; overview of ethical considerations
    • Comparison of ethical issues illuminated by the comparative research on civilian and military long distance marriages


Brief Description
: Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans are experiencing elevated divorce rates, in part due to PTSD.  Each PTSD symptom cluster uniquely impacts relationship satisfaction.  This seminar will delve into current literature, prominent theories, practice implications, and ethical issues that clinicians will encounter when treating veterans and their significant others, with implications for the family unit.        

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI)

Course # MIL 9002
Instructor: Bill Peters, Ph.D., LCSW, LPC

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20120138)

If you are part of the Military/Veteran Certificate Program, only the following are approved: LMSW, AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20120138)

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Define and describe mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI):
  • Incidence
  • Causes
  • Symptoms
  • Understand the impact of MTBI on the individual, family, and community
  • Understand the implications of MTBI on assessment, planning, and implementation of social work services for persons with MTBI
  • Locate resources for persons with MTBI


Topical Outline:

  • Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI): symptoms, incidence, causes
  • Failure to recognize and diagnose: impact on individual, family, and community
  • Recognition of MTBI: assessment and evaluation
  • Implications for social work practice:
    • Service needs of persons with MTBI
    • Resources for persons with MTBI


Brief Description
Similar to learning disabilities in the past, the incidence and impact of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) on individual functioning has been greatly overlooked in the human services. This on-line course will provide social workers with the skills to recognize mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), refer for assessment and evaluation, adapt services, and secure resources for persons with MTBI and their families.  The awareness of the incidence of MTBI has increased both as a result of sports injuries and from the Iraq conflict.  While “hardened” vehicles and personnel carriers were helpful in reducing loss of life from IEDs, they did not prevent concussions from the shock waves of the explosions, resulting in many “hidden” injuries.  

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Perspectives in Aging in American Society

Course # GER 8000
Instructor: Patricia Gleason-Wynn, Ph.D., LCSW, CSW-G

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20140138)

GERONTOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

This is online course #1 of 5 onlines courses required for the Gerontology Certificate Program

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify facts, aging demographics, social attitudes, and myths regarding older adults       
  • Explore the biological, psychological, and social processes of aging from a multidisciplinary perspective
  • Gain an understanding of theories on aging and of social work interventions as applied to older adults


Topical Outline:

  • Aging Demographics: Current and Future Growth           
  • Biological and Social Theories of Aging
  • Overview of Physical and Cognitive Changes, Myths and Stereotypes
  • Sexuality and Intimacy
  • Resiliency in People of Color and Women
  • Social Supports and Informal Caregiving
  • Elder Abuse and Neglect
  • Retirement and Volunteering
  • Death, Dying, Bereavement, and Widowhood
  • Social Policy: Health and Long-Term Care Policy and Social Service Agencies


Brief Description
This course provides an overview of current aging issues from growing demographics to social service delivery focusing on issues related to growing older in the United States. You will gain an awareness of gerontology, myths and stereotypes of aging, theories of aging, and of the impact of an aging society on social policy and social work practice. 

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The Aging Process: Physical Health and Mental Health

Course # GER 8001
Instructor: Patricia Gleason-Wynn, Ph.D., LCSW, CSW-G

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20140138)

GERONTOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

This is online course #2 of 5 onlines courses required for the Gerontology Certificate Program

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify the physiological changes associated with the aging process
  • Identify methods to ascertain the health status and physical functioning (e.g., ADLs and IADLs) of older adults in order to design service plans, provide assistance, and manage or improve mental or physical functioning
  • Recognize mental health conditions present in the older adult population
  • Explore standardized assessment and diagnostic tools that are appropriate for use with older adults and mental health concerns


Topical Outline:

  • Overview of the Usual Aging Process
  • Diseases and Disorders Commonly Associated With Growing Older
    • Sensory Changes
    • Emotional, Mental, and Cognitive Disorders
      • Mood Disorders
      • Anxiety
      • Adjustment and Personality Disorders
      • Dementia
      • Substance Abuse
      • Suicide
  • Assessment and Intervention Skills
    • Tools for Assessment
    • Overview of Evidenced Based Practice Models
      • PEARLS
      • Healthy IDEAS
  • Barriers to Treatment
    • Cohort
    • Cultural


Brief Description
:  This course provides an overview of the normal aging process of the body's systems, diseases and disorders associated with aging, sensory changes with aging, cognitive changes, and learning and memory. You will be introduced to the major emotional and mental health problems encountered in aging including mood disorders, anxiety, adjustment and personality disorders, dementia, cognitive problems, substance abuse, and suicide. Barriers to treatment and cohort and cultural issues will be explored. 

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Social Work Practice with Older Adults

Course # GER 8002
Instructor: Kim Olmedo, LCSW, CCM, CSW-G

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20140138)

GERONTOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

This is online course #3 of 5 onlines courses required for the Gerontology Certificate Program

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Enhance social work skills needed for working with older adults and their families
  • Identify the core elements of a comprehensive geriatric assissment, and develop plans to provide services to link older adults and their caregivers to resources and services
  • Gain an understanding of professional social work knowledge, values and skills needed for practice with diverse cultures and special populations of older persons
  • Gain critical awareness of aging from a personal perspective and its implications for practice


Topical Outline:

  • Introduction to Working with Older Adults
    • Accessibility and Sensory Issues
  • Geriatric Assessment
    • Reason for Assessment
    • Core Components
    • Strengths and Weaknesses
    • Treatment Planning
    • Tools to Aid in Assessment
  • Health Issues and Differential Diagnosis
    • Brief Overview of Common Chronic Health Issues
    • Dementia
    • Delirium
    • Depression
  • Legal Issues and Implications
    • Estate Planning Documents
    • Guardianship and Issues of Capacity/Incapacity
  • Care Continuum
    • Review of Diffenent Housing Options Along the Care Continuum
    • Services Available
    • Medical Care
  • Medicare and Medicaid
  • End of Life
    • Health Care Delivery at End of Life
    • Ethical Issues at End of Life
    • Legal Issues


Brief Description
:  This course will explore social work practice with older adults with attention given to populations at risk within the aging cohort such as the economically disadvantaged, racial, cultural and sexual minorities, immigrants, and adults with developmental or cognitive disability. Elements of a comprehensive geriatric assessment and the skills needed to complete an assessment are presented. Significant issues related to practice with older clients are explored.

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Aging Policy and Service Delivery in the United States

Course # GER 8003
Instructor: Patricia Gleason-Wynn, Ph.D., LCSW, CSW-G

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20140138)

GERONTOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

This is online course #4 of 5 onlines courses required for the Gerontology Certificate Program

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify federal, state, and local resources available to older adults and their families
  • Define terminology in understanding and navigating the aging network
  • Provide methods for identifying and accessing resources for older adults and their families


Topical Outline:

  • Introduction
    • Relevance of policy in aging practice
    • Overview of the current context of aging policy: demographics, ideology, and culture
    • Role of national, state, and local governments
    • Insurance vs. social welfare; entitlements, universal vs. needs based
    • Financing: present vs. future
  • The Older Americans Act
    • History, Function, Amendments, and Financing
  • Income and Poverty Issues
    • Social Security
    • Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
    • Special or Disenfranchised Populations: rural, minority, women, gays and lesbians, and disabled
  • Health Care
    • Medicare: Part A, B, C, and D
    • Medicaid
    • Long-term Care: nursing facilities, assisted living, community-based care
    • Long term care insurance
  • Mental Health Care
    • Issues
    • Policy
  • Kinship Care
    • Family Caregiving
    • Grandparents raising grandchildren
  • End of Life
    • Advanced Directives
    • Physician-assisted suicide
  • Visions for the Future
    • Concerns
    • Local services


Brief Description
:  This course provides a broad overview of public policies and programs in the United States that affect care and treatment of older adults. The Older Americans Act, Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security policies, along with the Administration on Aging are addressed.

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Ethical Issues and Aging

Course # GER 8004
Instructor: Patricia Gleason-Wynn, Ph.D., LCSW, CSW-G

This course is approved for 0.3 CEUs (3 contact hours) for LBSW, LMSW, LMSW-AP, LCSW, LPC, LMFT, Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers (#20140138)

GERONTOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

This is online course #5 of 5 onlines courses required for the Gerontology Certificate Program

Course Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to:

  • Define and examine values, ethics, moral principles and the process of ethical decision-making
  • Define professional boundaries and examine the concept as it relates to social work practice with older adults and caregivers
  • Explore specific ethical-related issues encountered in social work practice including autonomy and self-determination, paternalism, decision-making capacity, and end of life concerns


Topical Outline:

  • Definitions: Values, Ethics, and Moral Principles
    • Values: defines what is good
    • Ethics: defines what is right
    • Moral Principles
  • Ethical Challenges
    • Resource Constraints, Financial Limitations or Difficulty Recruiting Workers
    • Sustainability of Continued Services
    • Client's Home Environment and the Danger - Perceived or Encountered
    • Family Issues
    • Culturally Competent Care
    • Development of Close Relationships
    • Safety Issues for the Social Worker
    • Telemedicine
    • Care Rural Areas
  • Ethical-related Issues Enclountered in the Care of Frail Older Adults
    • Determination and Safety Paternalism Decision-making Capacity
    • End of Life Choices and Advance Directives
  • Ethical-decision Making
    • Complex, multi-faceted, defy simplistic solutions
    • Regulated by laws, by professional codes, and the calues of the professional
    • What should I do, and am I doing what is best for my client?


Brief Description
:  This course explores the ethical issues encountered by professionals who work with older adults or caregivers who are involved in caring for older adults. Issues such as autonomy, self-determination, informed consent, surrogate decision-making, and advanced directives are examined. You will gain knowledge to develop a personal, professional, ethical framework within which to consider legal and ethical issues in working with older adults.

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