Skip to main content

Sustainability Courses

UT Arlington offers sustainability courses in a variety of disciplines, and we're adding more every semester. These classes prepare students from all academic backgrounds to analyze the connections between social, economic, cultural, and environmental phenomena and address global concerns about the future. 

School of Architecture Honors College College of Liberal Arts
College of Business College of Engineering
College of Science School of Urban and Public Affairs

Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ESS) Minors and faculty who teach environmental and sustainability courses: please join ESS Facebook Group, called ESS Minors at UTA. Feel free to post information about ESS courses, or related programs, events, etc.

Link to Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/393320087353945/

 

HONR-LA 2303. THE LITERATURE AND SCIENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS
Current environmental crises are complicated matters that require us to understand them from multiple perspectives, including those of the sciences, the social sciences, and the arts and humanities. This class will focus on how recent literary texts - as well as film, photography, and websites - portray current environmental crises. We will focus on four major issues: toxins, climate change, extinction and biodiversity, and the state of the oceans. The class will explore how the literature, film, photography, and web sites portray these issues, examining how they incorporate scientific facts and frameworks, how they make different kinds of appeals to their audiences, and how they attempt to effect change. More broadly, the class will discuss the relationship between literature and science as well as the question of how well scientific information travels across different domains. The class will require presentations, a midterm and a final exam, a short paper, and a final project that will require cross-disciplinary research. Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00-12:20pm. For more information, contact Dr. Stacy Alaimo, Associate Professor of English and PSC co-chair, stacya@uta.edu, or visit her website.

THE ETHICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Timothy L. Henry, Honors College Assistant Dean and Biology Lecturer
Drawing on many interdisciplinary areas, this course will demonstrate how environmental problems can be approached from a variety of perspectives. While this course doesn't seek to provide all the answers, it hopes to teach how to recognize environmental ethical problems, and how to think productively and sustainably about them. At the conclusion of this course, the goal is for students to have developed sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in environmental ethics, and sustainable concepts that may alleviate them. This junior/senior seminar course is being taught as a part of UT Arlington's Active Learning for Critical Thinking initiative.

ARCH 4395. SUSTAINABILITY FOR EVERYONE

Architecture Professor Douglas Klahr will offer a new course in Fall 2009 about sustainability. Entitled Sustainability for Everyone, the goal is to assemble a dynamic group of students from different departments in a manner that reflects the truly interdisciplinary nature of the subject: economic, environmental, philosophical and societal. Readings will be taken from books such as Cradle-to-Cradle, The Bridge at the Edge of the World, The Ethics of Climate Change, Six Degrees, Hijacking Sustainability, and The Transition to Sustainability. Interested upper-level students can learn more about Professor Klahr via e-mail, or stop by his office in Room 423 of the Architecture building.



Honors College (website)

HONR-LA 2303.  See below, College of Liberal Arts.

HONR 4103. ETHICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Timothy L. Henry, Honors College Assistant Dean and Biology Lecturer
Drawing on many interdisciplinary areas, this course will demonstrate how environmental problems can be approached from a variety of perspectives. While this course does not seek to provide all the answers, it hopes to teach how to recognize environmental ethical problems, and how to think productively and sustainably about them. This junior/senior seminar course is being taught as a part of UT Arlington's "Active Learning for Critical Thinking" initiative.



School of Architecture (website)

ARCH 3331. ARCHITECTURE & ENVIRONMENT

ARCH 3331. SUSTAINABILITY (3-0)
An overview of sustainable design integrated with natural resource conservation. Prerequisite: junior standing in Architecture or consent of department.

ARCH 4311. ARCHITECTURAL THEORY: The Everyday City

ARCH 4395. SUSTAINABILITY FOR EVERYONE (3-0)
This interdisciplinary course examines how major aspects of everyone's lives are interconnected with respect to sustainability: our homes, our economy, our political system, and our culture. Created for the entire university community, students from every discipline - not just architecture - are sought for this course. Prerequisite: students must be in their third year at minimum.

ARCH 4330. ENERGY USE AND CONSERVATION IN ARCHITECTURE (3-0)
Basic concepts of the efficient use and conservation of energy related to architectural design principles. Prerequisite: ARCH 2552



College of Business (website)

ECON 4302. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (3-0)
Economic forces that influence the quality of the environment; economic theory and environmental management; regulatory requirements for economic impact analysis; international issues including trade and implications for Third World economies. Prerequisite: ECON 2306.

REAE 5301 – SUSTAINABLE ISSUES IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT - A survey-based course that analyzes current and historical sustainability issues. The global and political nature of this evolving discipline is emphasized. Additionally, a macro view of the components currently embodied in the practice of sustainability will be examined and discussed.

REAE 5302 – SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT – Business strategies that emphasize quantitative methods, asset allocation, socially responsible investing, and evaluation research.

REAE 5303 – SUSTAINABLE POLICIES IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT – Governmental, regulatory, and internal reporting and policy development related to sustainability; grant writing will also be explored.

REAE 5304 – SUSTAINABLE PROJECTS IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT - A field-based study of buildings, developments, organizations, and companies that exemplify sustainable practices. Course will include elements of social networking and communication strategies.

REAE 5318 – SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - Sustainability perspectives about values, rights, property and what constitutes an optimum human environment; sustainability principles and case studies emphasizing on-the-ground, incentive-based commercial investment real estate development that balances economic growthwith environmental quality.  Projects will include those in urban areas as well as those in rural areas focusing on agricultural elements.

REAE 5316 – ADAPTIVE REUSE & REDEVELOPMENT OF COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE - The tools and techniques associated with the market and financial feasibility analysis of adaptively reusing and redeveloping existing properties into economically viable commercial investment real estate.



College of Engineering (website)

EE 4328. INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SOURCES

One section will be offered to EE students and another for all other engineering and science students of junior or senior standing.

CE 3334. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (3-0)
Physical, chemical, and biological unit operations and processes in an air, water, and land environment. Prerequisite: CHEM 1442; CE 3305 or consent of instructor.

CE 4323. LANDFILL DESIGN

CE 4350. AIR POLLUTION (3-0)
An introduction to the air pollution field which encompasses a wide range of topics, including: atmosphere and ideal gas law; pollutant types, sources, effects; Clean Air Act; gas flow measurement; air pollutant measurement; air pollution meteorology and dispersion modeling; air pollution control. Prerequisite: CE 3334.

CE 4351. PHYSICAL UNIT PROCESSES

This course covers the basics of water quality modeling that will be used in subsequent environmental engineering courses and the physical processes used in water and air quality control including a discussion of the theory, design, and operation of physical unit processes.  See course Syllabus Here.

CE 4354. INTRODUCTION TO SOLID & HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

CE4355. DESIGN OF WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES

CE 4356. DESIGN OF MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS (3-0)
Sources of water supply, water demand, treatment processes, and combinations. Design of intake, raw water pumps, design of treatment facilities, and distribution system. Prerequisite: CE 3334.

CE 4357. DESIGN OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS (3-0)
Characteristics of municipal wastewater, design of sanitary and storm sewers, pumping stations, and wastewater treatment processes. Process train and treatment plant layout, hydraulic profile, instrumentation and controls, and upgrading of secondary treatment plants. Prerequisite: CE 3334.

CE5316. WATER SUPPLY AND TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN (3 - 0)
Theory and design of community water supply systems. Design of treatment facilities, equipment selection and distribution network, and cost estimates. Credit not granted for both CE 4356 and 5316. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and 3334, or consent of instructor.

CE5317. WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN (3 - 0)
Effluent quality standards, and theory and design of wastewater treatment plants. Design and layout of wastewater treatment systems using manufacturers' catalogs, and cost estimates. Credit not granted for both CE 4357 and 5317. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and 3334, or consent of instructor.

CE5318. PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES I (3 - 0)
Principles of unit process modeling using reactor and kinetic theory, and theory and design of mixing, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, gas transfer, adsorption, ion exchange, and disinfection. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and 3334, or consent of instructor.

CE5319. PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES II (3 - 0)
Principles of water chemistry applied to the theory and design of unit processes including coagulation, precipitation, corrosion, oxidation-reduction, and membrane processes. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and 3334, or consent of instructor.

CE5320. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT (3 - 0)
Technical aspects of current practices and new developments in the management of solid waste facilities. Theory and design of solid waste collection, transfer, disposal and recovery, and reuse systems. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and 3334, or consent of instructor.

CE5321. ENGINEERING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS (3 - 0)
Fundamental principles of engineering science applicable to the comprehension and design of engineered environmental systems. Includes water and air quality indices; kinetic and reactor theory; mass and energy balances; fluid system theory; and applications of physical, chemical and biological processes in the design of engineered environmental systems. May not be used to satisfy any of the requirements for a graduate degree in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite: PHYS 1441, CHEM 1442, MATH 2425.

CE5322. AIR POLLUTION CHEMISTRY AND METEOROLOGY (3 - 0)
Designed to give students an understanding of how pollutants react and travel in the atmosphere. Topics include: chemistry of ground-level ozone formation, ozone layer depletion, acid deposition, fine particle formation, and climate change; meteorological variables impacting pollutant concentrations in the atmosphere, such as atmospheric stability, turbulence, and wind speed. Prerequisite: CE 5328.

CE5323. AIR QUALITY MODELING (3 - 0)
Mathematical models for predicting air pollutant transport and transformation in the atmosphere, to evaluate health impacts and potential control strategies. The course covers four types of air quality models: box models, photochemical grid models, Gaussian dispersion models (major emphasis), and receptor models. Prerequisite: CE 5328.

CE5324. TRANSPORTATION AND AIR QUALITY (3 - 0)
Generation of pollutants in gasoline and diesel engines. Emission estimation via measurement and modeling (MOBILE 6). Prediction of pollutant concentrations near roadways. Vehicle emission control using alternative engine design, alternate fuels, add-on technology. Travel demand management and transportation control measures for emission reduction.

CE5325. BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES (3 - 0)
Biological processes used in water quality control. Includes principles from microbiology and biochemistry applied to suspended and attached growth systems. Prerequisite: CE 5318.

CE5327. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN (3 - 0)
Design of air pollution control systems for stationary sources, including incinerators, adsorption systems, absorption systems, biofilters, cyclones, electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters, and wet scrubbers. Prerequisite: CE 5328.

CE5328. FUNDAMENTALS OF AIR POLLUTION (3 - 0)
An introduction to the air pollution field including: atmosphere and ideal gas law; pollutant types, sources, effects; Clean Air Act; air pollution measurement; overviews of air pollution meteorology, dispersion modeling, air pollution control, and mobile sources; international air pollution; and indoor air quality. Credit not granted for both CE 5328 and 4350. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CE 3334 or CE 5321 or consent of instructor.

CE5329. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (3 - 0)
Process for the assessment and response to contamination; integrating risk and exposure practices to ensure protection of human health and environment. Includes characterization, EPA tier approach, general aspects of toxicology, dose exposure, pathways, receptors, migration and risk assessment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CE5355. ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING (3 - 0)
Overview of environmental law and regulations and permit development critical to design and construction, such as Stormwater Pollution Prevention and Planning, Environmental Impact (Statements, Assessments and Exclusion), Nationwide Permits, USA COE Permits and related screening models. Credit not granted for both CE 5355 and 4333. Prerequisite: CE 3334 and 4331 or consent of instructor.

CE6323. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT (3 - 0)
Sources, chemistry, monitoring, and classifications of hazardous wastes. Discussion of environmental hazards, legal aspects, transportation, detoxification, storage, and disposal and incineration. Prerequisite: CE 5325, or consent of instructor.

CE6324. INDUSTRIAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTES (3 - 0)
Industrial classification and profile, waste characterization, industrial waste survey and sewer plan, sampling and data analysis, hazardous and priority chemicals and their impact, waste minimization, pretreatment regulations, specialized physical, chemical, and biological waste treatment processes, specific industries and applicable waste treatment process train, combined industrial and municipal waste treatment. Prerequisite: CE 5325 or consent of instructor.

CE6329. ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CONTROL PROCESSES (2 - 3)
Standard laboratory techniques for unit operations and processes in environmental engineering. Advanced environmental engineering theories and practices, research topics, and methods. Prerequisite: CE 5325 or consent of instructor.



College of Liberal Arts (website)

ART 3357

ANTH 3369. MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-0)
Medical systems studied cross-culturally to understand how environmental, biological, social, and cultural factors affect disease and health. The cultural dynamics of traditional practitioners and rituals within the health care system. Methods of articulating modern medicine with traditional medicine are discussed.

ANTH 3325. ETHNOGRAPHY OF SOUTH AMERICA (3-0)
The indigenous groups of South America, with emphasis on the Aymara and Quechua of the Andes. Topics include culture change, environmental destruction, and preservation of cultural heritage.

ENGL 1301. EXPOSITORY WRITING AND THE ENVIRONMENT
The goal of the course-in addition to developing critical reading, writing, and thinking skills-is to challenge students' conceptions of the environment, encourage them to consider how they are always interacting with the environment, and the importance of these interactions in a world faced with depleting resources that require increasing programs that promote sustainability.
Justin Lerberg, College of Liberal Arts

ENGL 1302: WRITING ARGUMENT, THINKING GREEN.
English 1302 is an integrated course in critical thinking, reading, and writing.  Because these three processes are mutually dependent, we will spend our time in the course reading and analyzing texts, as well as writing them.  The type of formal writing we will do in this class is generally known as argumentative writing, or rhetoric.  In this type of writing, you will show both your understanding of argument structure, of texts we read, and your own thoughts about issues they discuss.  Furthermore, the theme of the course is the environment and you will be encouraged to engage with this subject in multiple ways through argumentative writing and presentation as well as through your daily practice. 

ENGL 2303. TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3-0)
May include topics in film and literature, women in literature, short story, and autobiography. May be repeated for credit when content changes.  Click Here for Info on ENGL 2303.005

ENGL 2303. LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This courses will discuss the relation between literature and environment, investigating the many representations of environment, nature, and animals, in literature, film, theory, and popular culture texts.

ENGL 2303-004: THE MEDIATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT.
This course examines the mediation of the environment through literature, film, websites and other mediums. Specifically, we will focus on the role of language and digital technology and the uses of narration, observation, and immersion in representing the environment. Language and technology are paramount in how we approach and understand the environment through the ways in which they allow us to examine aspects of it without necessarily experiencing them first hand. Literature, film, websites, and other mediums allow us to view and discuss the environment without ever having "been there" (for example, the Polar Regions). In other words, language and digital technology help to reveal and construct the environment. We will explore how literature, film, websites, and other mediums incorporate facts and appeals in their arguments in an attempt to persuade their audiences. In the end, this course examines such basic questions as whether it is possible to "know" the environment without language and technology and whether all approaches to the environment are mediated. REQUIRMENTS: short papers, mid-term exam, paper/project, and final exam. TEXTS: Neuromancer (Gibson), White Noise (Delillio), High Tide (Lynas), Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Dick), All Over Creation (Ozeki), and Course Packet. You will also be required to watch Everything's Cool: A Toxic Comedy about Global Warming (Gold and Helfand), Manufactured Landscapes (Baichwal), Blade Runner (Scott), and various film clips that I will prepare.

ENGL 3300. SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3-0)
May include topics on Utopian literature, the American short story, Southwestern American literature, and modern British fiction. May be repeated for credit when content changes.

ENGL 3300 - Nature and Environment in American Literature
Dr. Stacy Alaimo, College of Liberal Arts

ENGL 3347. TOPICS IN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURES (3-0)
Either an intensive focus within one tradition or a comparison between two or more traditions. Topics may include Asian-American literature, the American Indian novel, the Harlem Renaissance, Jewish-American literature, Mexican-American and American Indian literatures, classic American Renaissance literature and African American literature.

ENGL 3347. POWER AND PLACE
Dr. Stacy Alaimo, College of Liberal Arts

ENGLISH 3347-001: MULTICULTURAL U.S. LITERATURE: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE LITERATURE AND FILM.
This advanced English course, which fulfills the "diversity" requirement for English majors, explores the literature and film of environmental justice.  Environmental justice as a social movement focuses on the unequal distribution of environmental harms vs. environmental benefits-especially those distributions shaped by race and class.  We'll discuss novels, autobiographies, poetry, a few films, websites, and one work of nonfiction. The course features works by African-Americans, Native Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Euro-Americans.  The topics include the relation between land and culture, land rights, toxic neighborhoods and workplaces, mountaintop removal, Hurricane Katrina, and climate change.   Requirements: participation, presentations, short essay, midterm exam, final exam and a final project, which may be either a research paper or a multimedia project.   Readings:  Louise Erdrich, Tracks;  Ana Castillo, So Far from God;  Devon G. Pena, Mexican Americans and the Environment: Tierra Y Vida;  Suzanne Antonetta, Body Toxic;  Percival Everett, Watershed;  Percival Everett, Wounded;  Ann Pancake, Strange as this Weather Has Been;  Mark Lynas,  High Tide: The Truth About Climate Change;  Timothy Corrigan, A Short Guide to Writing about Film (any edition!) Films will include Thunderheart, Trouble the Water, and Texas Gold.

ENGL 4336. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0)
Important themes, movements, regions, genres, or cross-cultural relationships. May be repeated for credit when course content changes.

ENGL 4336. NATURE IN FILM AND THEORY
Dr. Stacy Alaimo, College of Liberal Arts

ENGL 6339. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 - 0)
Themes or issues not bound by particular historical periods, for example, women writers, canon formation, American Indian literature, African-American literature, utopian literature, cultural studies. May be repeated when content changes.

English 6339. ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE AND THEORY

English 6339. NATURE AND ENVIRONMENT IN FILM AND THEORY

English 6339. TELLING MATTER: Writing Bodies, Nature, and Science

English 6339. THE POSTHUMAN: Human/Animal/Environment

English 6339. NATURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE

ENGLISH 6370: TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT LITERATURE AND FILM OF THE OCEAN.
Despite the fact that oceans are not only the largest but also some of the most imperiled environments on the planet, the ocean has generally been neglected by environmental movements, environmental theorists, and scholars of animal studies.  While there are a great many works of literature about the ocean, it is crucial to study visual representations of marine environments and sea creatures since visual media have had a powerful impact on how we understand the ocean.    This course will introduce the literature, film, and scholarship about the ocean, attending to how the focus on blue, rather than green, shifts predominant approaches in environmental criticism, environmental theory, and animal studies.  We will read fiction, science fiction, poetry, memoir, theory, history, and nonfiction science/environment writing, including works by Rachel Carson, Sylvia Earle, Samuel Coleridge, Herman Melville, Linda Hogan, Joan Slonczewski, and others.   We will discuss several films, including Jaws, Sharkwater, Whale Rider, the films of Jean Painleve, and excerpts from Blue Planet.   We will also look at the visual media included on scientific and activist web sites, some of the early drawings of ocean creatures by Haeckel and Agassiz, and recent "coffee table" photography books, as we analyze the meaning and implications of marine aesthetics.  [No previous knowledge of oceans or environmental criticism is required, but students should have already taken English 5300 or its equivalent.]  

GEOG 3355. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (see HIST 3355)

HIST 3326.  HISTORY OF THE OLD SOUTH

HIST 3350.

HIST 3352.

HIST 3355. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3-0)
People and the natural environment from the colonial period to the present. Ecological change, conservation movements, and artistic and literary interpretations of landscape and nature. Also listed as GEOG 3355; credit will be granted only once.

HIST 5304. COLLOQUIUM IN REGIONAL /TOPICAL U.S. HISTORY (3-0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues pertaining to a region or a major topic in the history of the U.S. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST 5304. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
This course will explore the young field of environmental history, as it is practiced in and applied to the United States. The class will consider theoretical and conceptual matters as well as what environmental history has to offer "traditional" history.

HONR-LA 2303. THE LITERATURE & SCIENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS
This class will focus on how recent literary texts (as well as film, photography, and websites) portray current environmental crises, focusing on four major issues including toxins, climate change, extinction and biodiversity, and the state of the oceans. Note: This is an introductory class that does not assume any advanced knowledge in either literature or science. Prerequisite: membership in the Honors College.
Dr. Stacy Alaimo, College of Liberal Arts

PHIL 3324.

SOCI 3324.



College of Science (website)

BIOL 2343. EVOLUTION & ECOLOGY 

This course reviews significant aspects of organismal biology and presents current hypotheses concerning the origin and diversification of life on earth. The ecological and behavioral interactions between organisms and their biotic/abiotic environments are considered from an evolutionary perspective. See Course Syllabus Here.

BIOL 3318/5354: LIMNOLOGY
The living and nonliving components of inland waters. An introduction to the geological, physical, and chemical background and to the major organisms and ecological processes. The course includes examples of human impacts and interactions with inland waters. Prerequisites BIOL 1441, 1442 or equivalent.

BIOL 3325. PLANT ECOLOGY

(3-0) Introduction to the field of plant ecology including physiological, population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1442, 2343. 

 

BIOL 3347. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (3-0)
Examines major environmental problems that affect biological systems with an emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442, 2343, 3315 or permission of instructor.

 

BIOL 3355. TOXICICOLOGY

(3-0) An introduction to the general principles of toxicology with an emphasis on certain classes of toxic agents, their sources and toxic effects, as well as their environmental fates. Pollution of various media (air, water and soil) and the differences between them will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441 or 4 hours of BIOLTRAN; CHEM 1441 and CHEM 1442.

BIOL 4354. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (3-0)
Basics of the broad range of health considerations at the core of environmental projects and regulation. The course will provide the knowledge required for students to successfully complete the Texas Registered Sanitarian Examination or the Environmental Health Association's Registered Environmental Health Specialist Examination. Prerequisite: BIOL 1441, 1442; CHEM 1301, 1302; PHYS 1441 or permission of the environmental biology option advisor.

CHEM 1445. CHEMISTRY FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS

(3-3) Chemistry of things of everyday life: energy, radioactivity, petroleum products, pollution, the nature of matter, and the applications of chemistry to things we use. CHEM 1445, 1446 cannot be used to fulfill the 1441/1442 requirement in any degree program. 

GEOL 1450 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3-1) The study of ocean basins and their origin, ocean currents, waves and tides, properties of sea water, and marine ecosystems, emphasizing the role of the ocean in the Earth system. Discussion of weekly ocean news, and incorporation of web-delivered current oceanographic data into the course material. Formerly offered as GEOL 3301 and GEOL 3184 and GEOL 2412; credit will be granted only once.

GEOL 2411. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES (3-1)
Global environmental challenges confronting humanity such as pollution, depletion of natural resources, ecosystem deterioration, food production and population growth. Prerequisite: GEOL 1425.

GEOL 3305. INTRODUCTION TO METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY (3-0)
Dynamics of the atmosphere: examination of processes that control weather; long-term climatic cycles and geological record of global climate change; atmospheric pollution and its effects on climate. Prerequisite: six hours of science and junior standing, or permission of the instructor. Offered as GEOG 3305, and GEOL 3305 credit will be granted only once. (Science and Engineering majors: see GEOL 4405).

GEOL 4308. ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY (3-0)
The geochemistry of natural waters with emphasis on processes that control solute concentrations including complexation reactions, oxidation and reduction reactions, biogeochemistry, and chemical weathering reactions. Prerequisites: GEOL 2445 and 3443, CHEM 1301, or permission of instructor.

GEOL 4325. PALEOCLIMATE & CLIMATE CHANGE (3-0)
Climate change throughout geologic time, especially the last 100 million years: models of the climate system, reconstruction and modeling of past climates, abrupt climate change, warm climates, paleoclimatology, climate change and mass extinctions. Prequisite: GEOL 1425, MATH 1426, and junior standing or permission of instructor.

GEOL 4405 METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY (3-3) A quantitative approach to the study of the structure, energy, and motions of the atmosphere. Prerequisite: MATH 1426 and junior standing, or permission of instructor. 



School of Urban and Public Affairs (website)

CIRP5305. LAND USE, MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (3 - 0)
Assesses land use, management and development and considers new directions. Relates comprehensive planning, environmental management, and land use.

CIRP 5308 – METROPOLITAN SUSTAINABILITY AND PLANNING ETHICS (3-0) Surveys climate change and other environmental phenomena as challenges for effective, democratic planning and policy in metropolitan areas. Explores relationship of environmental sustainability to both economic vitality and social equity. Writing-intensive course with special attention to ethical dimensions of institutional responses to sustainability concerns.

CIRP 5327 – INTRODUCTION TO GREEN CITIES AND TRANSPORTATION (3-0) Introduction to concepts of green cities and transportation, environmental and transportation challenges, and school of thoughts on causes of environmental and transportation problems, with emphasis on planning practices and policies in relation to environmental and transportation issues and roles of planners in shaping urban landscape and infrastructure.

CIRP 5332/5333 - PROJECT PLANNING (0-9)

Skills, practical experience, problem-solving methods and techniques in mapping, design, planning and research projects. Studio and seminar for field studies in the practical application of city and regional planning. This course is designed to provide experience working under contract with a "real world" client. It should be taken in the second half of the student's program of study; exceptions may be made for those with unique backgrounds. May be repeated as topic changes.

CIRP 5332 - Carbon Footprint Reduction Planning

CIRP 5333 - Carbon Footprint Analysis

CIRP 5340 – GIS AND SUITABILITY ANALYSIS (3-0) Acquaints students with theoretical and practical aspects of suitability analysis process or activity allocation on land use/environmental policies. Uses Geographic Information System (GIS) and computer models for overlaying map analysis, buffering, market demand and activity locations, etc. to incorporate environmental and ecological factors into the determination of land development potential including soils, slope, drainage, vegetation, and related factors.

CIRP5341 - ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS: LAWS AND PLANNING (3-0)
Federal, state, and local environmental regulations which have effect on the practice of city and regional planning. Specific articles, laws, and directives contrasted and compared to local city design and development controls. Subjects include CERCLA, RCRA, SARA, TSCA, OSH Act, among others.

CIRP5342 - ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (3-0)
Focuses on the physical environmental dimensions of urbanization including such factors as pollution, waste disposal, and land use; stresses the role of economic, social, and political institutions as these affect environmental quality of the city. Offered as CIRP 5342 and URPA 5317; credit will be granted only once.

CIRP 5343/URPA 5365): FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
While the companion course Environmental Policy (CIRP 5342) emphasizes how environmental issues and policies relate to economic, political, and legal institutions, this course examines the more fundamental question of why controversy so frequently erupts in environmental affairs, why it seems to play out in distinct patterns, and how these patterns are evolving. The course will demonstrate how environmental controversy, whether at the local level or the international, is rooted in conflict between a number of "schools of policy thought" with divergent perspectives on basic issues such as: how to cope with environmental complexity; how to balance the needs of economy and ecosystem; how to define progress; whether industrial capitalism is compatible with biological sustainability; and what role scientific and technical experts should play in environmental affairs. Conflict over these underlying issues drives headlines, law making, development of regulatory programs, and struggles over implementation. Exploring broad patterns of environmental policy thought and environmental controversy, the course aims to help students understand the often hidden dimensions of the policy debates, the policy perspectives reflected in their own disciplinary methodologies, and the policy perspectives from which they themselves operate.

CIRP5347. URBAN PROBLEMS (3-0)
Specific urban problems examined in depth, traced to their historical origins to see how they or similar problems have been dealt with in other times and places. Students will then propose possible solutions to the problems in their contemporary form. Offered as CIRP 5347 and URPA 5319.

CIRP 5347. Chemical contamination of communities

CIRP 5350: ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING
This course provides an overview of issues and problems in environmental planning at the metropolitan and regional scales, including: basic ecological principles; impacts of urban and industrial development; the national and international policy contexts; environmental justice and ethics; environmental economics, including externalities and public goods; sustainable development; planning for air quality, water quality, solid waste, pollution prevention, habitat conservation, etc.; and plan implementation.

CIRP5351. TECHNIQUES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (3 - 0)
Analysis of impact assessment documents from a variety of projects; study of federal laws and regulations governing the process; state impact assessment laws and regulations; and procedures used in other nations. Students will prepare an environmental assessment for a real-world project. Overviews of environmental site assessment, MIS documents, and environmental auditing will also be given.

CIRP 5352: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT POLICY & PRACTICE
Environmental assessment is the process of determining the environmental affects of development, facility construction/modification, and activities that could have a significant impact on the nation's air, water or land. This course includes review and analysis of the development of the environmental assessment process with focus on expectations of how environmental assessment will be transformed in the era of climate change.  Students evaluate new laws and regulations and the accelerated growth of environmental policy at all levels of government, especially among urban areas. The course includes review of selected environmental assessment documents and project case studies. Central to the course work is understanding the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) which is presented via a detailed study of the NEPA Process.

CIRP5353. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3 - 0)
This seminar examines the role of environmental law within the political-institutional framework of the American system. Emphasis is on the legal-judicial aspects of environmental regulation. Analyzes the decision of U.S. courts as these affect and interpret environmental laws and regulations for their legality and constitutionality.

INTS 4388 SPECIAL TOPICS: INTERDISCIPLINARY Sustainable Communities

This special topic course explores broad environmental issues in sustainable communities. The course reveals underlying natural processes that support sustainable urban economy, and that, at the same time, are affected by unsustainable built environment and activities.  The course serves as a laboratory for working with governmental and non-governmental organizations in the DFW area and developing issue-based, action research projects to solve real-word environmental problems in our communities. Potential topics include water conservation, waste management, brownfield, city farming, park services, energy efficiency, renewable energy and public and alternative transportation.  The course combines lecture, student-led discussion, in-class activities, site visits and collaborative team work for service learning projects in DFW communities. There is no pre-requisite for this course.

URPA 5317. ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (See CIRP 5342)

URPA 5365. FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (See CIRP 5343)