Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.


News

KVUEabc - September 9, 2017
VERIFY: How realistic is zero waste?
Cities across America are pushing programs to accomplish no more trash in landfills. It's called "zero waste." In order to get to zero waste, trash has to stop going to the landfill and instead go to a recycling facility. In Dallas, there's a brand new $20 million recycling facility that's a partnership between the City of Dallas and a private European recycling company called FCC. In Dallas, they've been able to make that profitable. But the recycling industry, as a whole, is struggling. "In terms of the monetary [aspect], it's not working in the USA," says Dr. Sahadat Hoassain, the director of the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability at the University of Texas at Arlington.

WFAA8abc - September 8, 2017
VERIFY: How realistic is zero waste?
Cities across America are pushing programs to accomplish no more trash in landfills. It's called "zero waste." In order to get to zero waste, trash has to stop going to the landfill and instead go to a recycling facility. In Dallas, there's a brand new $20 million recycling facility that's a partnership between the City of Dallas and a private European recycling company called FCC. In Dallas, they've been able to make that profitable. But the recycling industry, as a whole, is struggling. "In terms of the monetary [aspect], it's not working in the USA," says Dr. Sahadat Hoassain, the director of the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability at the University of Texas at Arlington.

ISWA News - August 15, 2017
ISWA-SWIS Winter School 2018: Win a Scholarship
Once again ISWA has teamed up with The Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), Texas and we are proud to announce the essay competition, giving people from all across the world the opportunity to win a scholarship to the exciting two-week school.

Phys.org - Friday, May 19, 2017
UTA civil engineer's book illustrates the power of recycled plastic in shoring up roads
Plastics make up a large percentage of municipal solid waste that inhabit landfills. A UTA civil engineer is finding a better use for that plastic just lying around in landfills. Sahadat Hossain, a civil engineering professor at The University of Texas at Arlington, is taking landfill plastic and recycling it into giant pins that are inserted in failing soil on highway slopes. Those pins strengthen the failing soil and in turn the highways, putting off or eliminating the need to repair the roads. Hossain's research, funded in prior years by the Texas Department of Transportation, has helped lead toward his publishing a book titled: "Sustainable Slope Stabilisation using Recycled Plastic Pins," which will release on CRC Press and Amazon on June 6. Sadik Khan and Golam Kibria, two of Hossain's research team members, who received their doctorates in civil engineering, were co-authors on the book. Khan is working as an assistant professor at Jackson State University in Mississippi. Kibria is working for a San Antonio-based consulting company. Hossain said repair and maintenance due to highway slope failures cost millions of dollars each year in the United States. He said highway slope failures usually happen at a depth of less than 10 feet.

EurekAlert - Friday, May 19, 2017
UTA civil engineer's book illustrates the power of recycled plastic in shoring up roads
A UTA civil engineer is finding a better use for that plastic just lying around in landfills. Sahadat Hossain, a civil engineering professor at The University of Texas at Arlington, is taking landfill plastic and recycling it into giant pins that are inserted in failing soil on highway slopes. Those pins strengthen the failing soil and in turn the highways, putting off or eliminating the need to repair the roads. Hossain’s research, funded in prior years by the Texas Department of Transportation, has helped lead toward his publishing a book titled: “Sustainable Slope Stabilisation using Recycled Plastic Pins,” which will release on CRC Press and Amazon on June 6. Sadik Khan and Golam Kibria, two of Hossain’s research team members, who received their doctorates in civil engineering, were co-authors on the book. Khan is working as an assistant professor at Jackson State University in Mississippi. Kibria is working for a San Antonio-based consulting company. Hossain said repair and maintenance due to highway slope failures cost millions of dollars each year in the United States. He said highway slope failures usually happen at a depth of less than 10 feet. Hossain credits the clay content of many North Texas soils for contributing to the highway slope dilemma.

UT Arlington News Center - Thursday, May 18, 2017
UTA civil engineer’s book illustrates the power of recycled plastic in shoring up roads
A UTA civil engineer is finding a better use for that plastic just lying around in landfills. Sahadat Hossain, a civil engineering professor at The University of Texas at Arlington, is taking landfill plastic and recycling it into giant pins that are inserted in failing soil on highway slopes. Those pins strengthen the failing soil and in turn the highways, putting off or eliminating the need to repair the roads. Hossain’s research, funded in prior years by the Texas Department of Transportation, has helped lead toward his publishing a book titled: “Sustainable Slope Stabilisation using Recycled Plastic Pins,” which will release on CRC Press and Amazon on June 6. Sadik Khan and Golam Kibria, two of Hossain’s research team members, who received their doctorates in civil engineering, were co-authors on the book. Khan is working as an assistant professor at Jackson State University in Mississippi. Kibria is working for a San Antonio-based consulting company. Hossain said repair and maintenance due to highway slope failures cost millions of dollars each year in the United States. He said highway slope failures usually happen at a depth of less than 10 feet. Hossain credits the clay content of many North Texas soils for contributing to the highway slope dilemma.

TCEQ Publication Natural Outlook, 2017
Landfill Recycling
The Denton project is part of a grander goal envisioned by Dr. Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington civil engineering professor and director of the university’s renowned Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability, which has been working closely with the Denton landfill on a variety of projects. In return for technical assistance, the landfill has made itself available for research by UT Arlington professors and graduate students.

UTA College of Engineering News - Tuesday, March 28, 2017
CE Teams Finish Strong at ASCE Geotech Competition
UTA finished second in the Geo Poster and Geo Prediction competitions and third in the GeoWall contest at the ASCE Geotechnical Frontiers Conference in Orlando March 12-15. The Geo Poster team was represented by Ph.D. candidate Asif Ahmed and senior Aya Shishani. The Geo Prediction team was made up of doctoral student Md. Ashraffuzzaman Khan and senior Kelli Greenwood. A four-member team including Asif Ahmed, Saif Bin Salah, Kelli Greenwood and Aya Shishani earned honorable mention in the GeoVideo category. The Geo Poster, Geo Prediction and Geo Video teams were mentored by Sahadat Hossain, professor of civil engineering and director of UTA’s Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability.

ISWA Global News - Issue 45, February 2017
Garbage In, Geeking Out
Success at the 2017 Winter School in Arlington and Denton in Texas this January with 38 registrations and a great two-week line-up of speakers, experts and hands-on practical work! The Winter School is organised and led by Dr. Sahadat Hossain of the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) at University of Texas, Arlington in cooperation with Mr. Dave Dugger, the Landfill Manager at Denton Landfill Incorporated.

Waste 360, January 31, 2017
How a Texas Landfill Plans to Boost Methane Production While Extending its Life
The Denton (Texas) Landfill, with support from University of Texas, Arlington (UTA), is about to leverage two high-tech tools to boost the facilities methane gas production by about threefold, and double to triple the site’s life. One of the tools is a sophisticated liquid monitoring system that will allow more water to be added to waste, accelerating its decomposition and ultimately increasing methane gas production.

UTA Inquiry, Winter 2016
Power Play
Finding viable, affordable energy sources is of preeminent importance in today’s society. Researchers at UTA are making breakthroughs that may help transform the way we consume and generate power. The University of Texas at Arlington established the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) in January 2015 to provide cities around the world with better solutions for common operational issues of solid waste management under direction of Sahadat Hossain, professor of civil engineering. Current members include Denton, Irving, and, further afield, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Global Methane Initiative - Friday, November 11, 2016
First-of-its-kind Sustainable Landfill in Texas Becomes a Global Model
The City of Denton Landfill (Texas, USA) reportedly is the first in the world to implement “closed-loop waste management.” Dr. Sahadat Hossain, of the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) at the University of Texas Arlington, developed the perpetual landfill model to be cost-efficient and potentially profitable.

North Texas Daily - Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Denton landfill moves toward sustainability
The Denton landfill, located on South Mayhill Road, has moved forward with a plan to implement new technologies to decrease the space Denton’s waste takes up. An eco-friendly landfill, Denton’s landfill has been working since 2008 to improve quality of life by using the waste to their advantage. A long-term process, the project began by partnering with UT Arlington, specifically Professor Sahadat Hossain and his team of students.

Dallas Innovates - Friday, September 30, 2016
Cracked Highways: UTA Prof has System to Fix ‘Em
A civil engineering professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, Dr Sahadat Hossain has received a $1.2 million contract from the Texas Department of Transportation to implement a system that would improve the sub-base repair of roadways, reducing cracking and improving maintenance in the process.

UT Arlington News Center - Tuesday, September 27, 2016
TxDOT implementation contract with UTA aims to reduce pavement cracking, improve slope stabilization
A University of Texas at Arlington civil engineering professor, Dr Sahadat Hossain has received a $1.2 million Texas Department of Transportation contract to implement a system to improve sub-base repair of roads that would reduce pavement cracking and thus improve pavement maintenance.

ALJAZEERA - Friday, 16 September 2016
Texas city with world's first eco-friendly landfill
According to Sahadat Hossain - the researcher pioneering the perpetual landfill model through the University of Texas Arlington and the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) - the waste is recycled and the land is sustained "easily [for] 200 years. Currently, a landfill lasts around 30-to-35 years".

UTAEngineer Magazine, 2016

UT Arlington Engineering News - Monday, August 29, 2016
Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) Team wins National Student Competition
A team of civil engineering graduate students from UTA's Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability won the Solid Waste Association of North America’s National Solid Waste Design Competition at WASTECON 2016 in August. The team, led by master's student Umme Zakira, included doctoral students Jobair Bin Alam, Elahe, and Rakib Ahmed and master’s students Nur Basit Zaman and Sangeeta. The students were tasked to solve a “real world” problem faced by solid waste professionals. Dr. Sahadat Hossain was the faculty advisor and Dr. Sonia Samir was the team mentor.

ISWA Global News - Issue 42, August 2016
ISWA/CCAC Landfill training workshop in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania
Two of ISWA’s outstanding experts on landfill, Dr Sahadat Hossain and David Dugger, conducted a workshop on “Technical and Managerial Aspects of New Sanitary Landfill Construction” in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, from 10 to 12 August.

ISWA Global News - Issue 42, August 2016
ISWA-SWIS Winter School 2017 - Apply for a Scholarship!
Registrations are now open for the 2nd ISWA Winter School ín Texas, USA and we are delighted to announce that there will be a number of Scholarships available once again. The school will take place in Texas, USA from January 16-27, 2017.

Star-Telegram Editorial - July 26, 2016
Put a pin in Texas’ infrastructure troubles
Civil engineering professor Sahadat Hossain and his team have been using plastic pins to combat the eventual sifting of soil since 2011. In places with pins, the slope only moved about 2 inches. In areas without pins, the slope moved anywhere from 9 to 15 inches. Soil treatment with pins cost only about $100,000 and could be a long-term fix for infrastructure woes.

Amarillo Globe News - July 28, 2016
Amarillo must fix venting issue at city landfill to avoid fines
Located on the north end of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, the work being done at the Denton landfill to turn trash into energy has not only piqued the interest of other cities in the Lone Star State, but also those living in dry climates across the globe. About seven years ago, that city partnered with University of Texas at Arlington Professor Sahadat Hossain and Assistant Professor Melanie Sattley to create a more sustainable landfill.

The Washington Times - July 26, 2016
Recent editorials from Texas newspapers - Put a pin in Texas’ infrastructure troubles
Civil engineering professor Sahadat Hossain and his team have been using plastic pins to combat the eventual sifting of soil since 2011. In places with pins, the slope only moved about 2 inches. In areas without pins, the slope moved anywhere from 9 to 15 inches. Soil treatment with pins cost only about $100,000 and could be a long-term fix for infrastructure woes.

Longview News-Journal - July 29, 2016
Other Voices: What Texas editors are saying - A smart solution
Civil engineering professor Sahadat Hossain and his team have been using plastic pins to combat the eventual sifting of soil since 2011. In places with pins, the slope only moved about 2 inches. In areas without pins, the slope moved anywhere from 9 to 15 inches. Soil treatment with pins cost only about $100,000 and could be a long-term fix for infrastructure woes.

Dykes Paving Blog
Texas Roads Made From Plastic
Dr. Hossain’s idea is to use recycled plastic soda bottles to create pins to stabilize the roads and lessen the incidence of cracks and buckling, thereby making the roads last longer. Not only is this a cheaper fix, but it is one that will last years longer than more traditional solutions. Each pin is constructed from 500 recycled soda bottles, so the environment is positively affected as well, giving Texas a green fix to a decades-old problem.

The Global Methane Initiative Blog - April 13, 2016
Sustainable Waste Management One Landfill at a Time
The International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) held its “Winter School” in January 2016 at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) and The City of Denton, Texas. Organized by UTA’s Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS), the training focused on providing waste professionals from 27 countries with the principles for integrated solid waste management (ISWM).

ISWA Global News - Issue 39, February 2016
ISWA-SWIS Winter School in Arlington, Texas, 18-29 January 2016
The Solid Waste Institute of Sustainability (SWIS) together with ISWA organised the first Winter School which was modeled similarly to the well-established ISWA Summer School programmes (2012-2014). The 2016 ISWA-SWIS Winter School was held at the University of Texas at Arlington and the City of Denton.

waste360.com, February 2, 2016
University, Texas City Partner to Prove Effectiveness of Bioreactor Landfills
Using a nearly $400,000 grant from the City of Denton, Texas, civil engineers at The University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) have created a plan to use moisture to speed up methane gas production at the city’s landfill.

FOX4news.com - Monday, February 1, 2016
FOX 4Ward: Modern Landfills
There's a project underway in Denton that could revolutionize the way cities deal with trash disposal. It turns out, landfills could be much more than just a place to leave garbage. In this segment, FOX 4's Dan Godwin talks to Dr. Sahadat Hossain, a professor of civil engineering at U.T. Dallas. He's just been awarded a grant by the city of Denton to look at the emerging field of "landfill mining."

UT Arlington News Center - Thursday, January 28, 2016
A Landfill With a 200 Year Lifespan
UTA professor Sahadat Hossain grew up in Bangladesh. Memories from his childhood shaped the research he’s turned into a career. “Many developing countries don’t have landfills. All they have are open dumps,” he said, “and everybody who lives by an open dump -- they are all sick. I saw those people when I was a kid.” Now the director of the UTA Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability, Hossain is converting the seemingly never-ending problem of waste generation into a solution.

WasteDIVE, January 21, 2016
University of Texas, city of Denton partner on landfill mining project
University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) and the city of Denton, TX are partnering on the first landfill mining project in Texas, hoping to discover that the space can be leveraged as a viable, re-usable resource.

CBSDFW.COM, January 20, 2016
UTA, City Of Denton Working On Converting Garbage Into Electricity
UT Arlington is helping Denton try to convert garbage into power and prevent 700 tons of garbage a day from piling into mountains of garbage. The idea has drawn students and researchers from 27 different countries to see what Denton and UTA are doing. “It is a different concept that we think will become more commonplace in the future,” said Denton Solid Waste and Recycling General Manager Vance Kemler.

NBCDFW.com - Wednesday, January 20, 2016
UTA Project at Denton's New Landfill Gaining Worldwide Attention
Students at UTA are working with the Denton city landfill on a groundbreaking project that could help communities everywhere figure out what to do with their future garbage – and create new kickbacks in the process. As far as Dr. Sahadat Hossain is concerned, one man’s trash can be another man’s treasure. “We’re taking a problem and converting it into an asset,” said Hossain, a professor of civil engineering at UT-Arlington.

phys.org, January 19, 2016
UTA civil engineers shaping sustainable solutions, increasing energy output at landfill
UTA and the City of Denton are partnering on a groundbreaking landfill project. Professor Sahadat Hossain, director of the UTA Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability, will discuss some of his team's findings and explore best practices in landfill management during the International Solid Waste Association's Winter School on Solid Waste Management - Landfill and Landfill Mining scheduled now through Jan. 29 on the UTA campus.

UT Arlington Magazine, Winter 2016
Sustainable Solutions Near and Far
Established in June, the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability helps countries and cities around the globe improve their waste management and make landfills more efficient and sustainable. The center stems from Director Sahadat Hossain’s work in waste management and bioreactor landfill technology and his research with the city of Denton and in Ghana, Africa.

UT Arlington News Center - Tuesday, January 19, 2016
UTA Civil Engineers Shaping Sustainable Solutions, Increasing Energy Production at Denton Landfill
A UTA civil engineering professor is working with the city of Denton to generate more energy through already closed landfill cells. Sahadat Hossain will share his research and techniques with global, national and North Texas solid waste leaders at a winter school that runs through Jan. 29 here at UTA and at the Denton landfill.

ISWA Global News - Issue 38, December 2015
2016 ISWA-SWIS Winter School - Essay Competition Results
The Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), Texas, USA is pleased to announce the “2016 ISWA-SWIS Competition on Sustainable Waste Management Essay” results. Participants will have the opportunity to gain knowledge on the particular challenges of solid waste management in developing economies. However, the unique aspect of the Winter School is the blend of in-class and hands on training. The in-class, theory based training and hands-on, operational training are perfectly balanced - with one week dedicated to each.

UTA Inquiry - Fall 2015
The Roads Ahead
In March 2011, Dr. Hossain and his team installed commercially available recycled plastic pins into the sinking slope on two 50-foot test sections of U.S. 287 in Midlothian. They used a method previously developed by the University of Missouri but under different soil conditions.During the subsequent monitoring period, the three reinforced sections moved only 1 to 2 inches, while the first control section settled about 15 inches and the second almost 9 inches. Additionally, about two years after the first pins were installed, the slope on the other side of the highway failed in two spots.

NPR Radio - Thursday, August 27, 2015
Turning Trash Into Treasure
The Texas Standard, which airs on NPR affiliates across Texas, broadcast a report about work to boost methane production in landfills, which is helping to convert trash into energy at the city of Denton landfill. The research, led by Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler of the UT Arlington Department of Civil Engineering, initially aired on KERA 90.1 FM (Dallas).

KERA News - Monday, August 31, 2015
Building A Better Dump: Transforming Trash Into Energy In Denton
KERA interviewed Sahadat Hossain, a UTA civil engineering professor, in a story about how technology is increasing methane production in the city of Denton landfill. That methane is then converted to energy, which powers several thousand Denton homes. Hossain is collaborating with colleague Melanie Sattler on the project.

ISWA Newsletter - Issue 35, June 2015
SWIS: A Co-Operation between the University of Texas and ISWA
The University of Texas at Arlington, USA has established the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability (SWIS) to provide leadership and expertise to countries and cities around the globe in how to make waste management and landfills more efficient and sustainable. The mission of SWIS is to work on developing clean and healthy urban cities through sustainable waste management. The center is developed in agreement with ISWA. As a first co-operation project, ISWA is working with SWIS for the ISWA-SWIS Winter School in January 2016 to be held Texas.

ISWA Newsletter - Issue 35, June 2015
ISWA-SWIS Winter School Coming up in Texas, USA
ISWA and the SWIS (Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability), housed at the University of Texas at Arlington, Texas, USA, paired up with the City of Denton, Texas, USA, to bring you the ISWA-SWIS Winter School on Solid Waste Management - LANDFILL & LANDFILL MINING. The unique aspect of the Winter School is the blend of in-class and hands on training. The in-class, theory based training and hands-on, operational training are perfectly balanced - with one week dedicated to each. This is also reflected by the locations: first week courses are held at the University of Texas in Arlington close to Dallas and week two is taking place in the City of Denton – more precisely at the Denton Landfill.

UT Arlington News Center - Tuesday, June 2, 2015
SWIS to Offer Sustainable Landfill Training Globally
The University of Texas at Arlington has established the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability to provide leadership and expertise to countries and cities around the globe in how to make waste management and landfills more efficient and sustainable. In addition, the center will share research with charter and member cities in Texas to better manage their landfills into the next century. Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington civil engineering professor, will serve as director of the institute. The center stems from Hossain’s extensive work in the area of waste management and bioreactor landfill technology and research that his team has conducted in cooperation with the city of Denton and Ghana, Africa.

UT Arlington in the News - Thursday, July 31, 2014
A problem foundation
KXAS/NBC 5 included a previously recorded interview with Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, for its consumer investigation follow-up report into one homeowner’s 3-year fight with a major homebuilder. “Everything suggests they have a problem,” Hossain initially said of foundation cracks in the home he reviewed. The homebuilder recently enlisted a residential warranty company to examine the claims. They agreed there are issues and repairs will be made.

UT Arlington in the News - Wednesday, May 7, 2014
Foundation woes
Sahadat Hossain, UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, was interviewed as part of a KXAS/NBC 5 investigation into one homeowner’s building issues. Hossain noted the direction of a crack in a wall and a slope in the home’s backyard as indicators of foundation problems.

UT Arlington in the News - Friday, September 13, 2013
Shoring up roads
A UT Arlington program of shoring up failing highway slopes using recycled plastic pins is extending the lives of those roadways, CBS 11 KTVT reported. Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, is leading the research and work effort with a $1 million grant from the Texas Department of Transportation.

UT Arlington in the News - Thursday, September 12, 2013
Making roads stronger
The Atlantic published an article about Sahadat Hossain, an associate professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington and the man behind a new state program to shore up crumbling roads using an underground support system of recycled plastic pins. With a million-dollar grant from the state department of transportation, Hossain is now beginning to implement the plastic pin solution on two other Texas Highways, Routes 183 and 360. "Eventually, the idea is going to catch on internationally," he says. "I'm confident."

UT Arlington in the News - Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Sensors going global
Two UT Arlington environmental engineers are adapting a sensor system they have developed to boost methane production in landfills to create an alternative energy source in Ghana, the website Azosensors reported. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, both associate professors of civil engineering, have won a $100,000 grant through the Environmental Protection Agency’s Global Methane Initiative.

UT Arlington in the News - Monday, September 9, 2013
Creating an alternate energy source
Two UT Arlington environmental engineers are adapting a sensor system they have developed to boost methane production in landfills to create an alternative energy source in Ghana, according to Phys.org. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, both associate professors of civil engineering, have won a $100,000 grant through the Environmental Protection Agency's Global Methane Initiative. The UT Arlington team also recently was awarded a $300,000 contract with the Dallas-based CP&Y engineering firm to help boost methane production in the Corpus Christi landfill system.

UT Arlington News Center - Monday, September 9, 2013
EPA engages UT Arlington environmental engineers team to generate energy from landfills in Ghana
Two UT Arlington environmental engineers are adapting a sensor system they have developed to boost methane production in landfills to create an alternative energy source in Ghana. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, both associate professors of civil engineering, have won a $100,000 grant through the Environmental Protection Agency’s Global Methane Initiative to study the feasibility of landfill gas to energy in Ghana, in the western Africa country of about 24 million people.

WFAA8abc - Monday, September 2, 2013
UTA researcher uses recycled plastic to strengthen highways | Youtube Link
Sahadat Hossain Ph.d., a UT Arlington civil engineering researcher, explains that hundreds of 10-foot "pins" made from recycled plastic have been jammed into the hillside to stop a problem called "slope failure." Hossain said it's a problem "almost everywhere in Texas. The plastic-rod stabilization solution originated elsewhere, but Dr. Hossain and his team at UTA re-designed how the pins are deployed, making them effective even in the notoriously shifting soils of Texas."

UT Arlington in the News - Monday, September 2, 2013
Stopping soil from shifting
A UT Arlington civil engineering researcher has won a $1 million state transportation department grant to install pins made from reclaimed and recycled plastic along some of the region’s busiest highways to shore up clay soils that support the roads. Sahadat Hossain, an associate professor of civil engineering, demonstrated the technique as a cost effective and efficient solution to failing soil slopes as part of the project during the last few years. His team first installed the pins along U.S. 287 in Midlothian.

UT Arlington News Center - Thursday, August 29, 2013
Civil engineers using recycled plastic pins to shore up highway slopes
A UT Arlington civil engineering researcher has won a $1 million state transportation department grant to install pins made from reclaimed and recycled plastic along some of the region’s busiest highways to shore up clay soils that support the roads. Sahadat Hossain, an associate professor of civil engineering, demonstrated the technique as a cost effective and efficient solution to failing soil slopes as part of the project during the last few years. His team first installed the pins along U.S. 287 in Midlothian.

UT Arlington in the News - Wednesday, January 16, 2013
Turning trash into treasure
Denton captures enough methane from the city landfill to power about 1,600 homes. All the city has to do is add water, which it has been doing in a process used since 2008, and researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington are helping to double that power-generating capacity. The project, which sounds like an excellent idea to us, is the first of its kind in Texas, according to UTA’s lead researcher, Sahadat Hossain.

UT Arlington in the News - Friday, January 11, 2013
UT Arlington researchers help expand Denton gas power's project
Denton powers about 1,600 homes with methane captured from the city landfill — gas created after the city started adding water to the pile in 2008, the Denton Record-Chronicle reported. Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are helping to double that power-generating capacity. The project is the first of its kind in Texas, according to UT Arlington’s lead researcher, Sahadat Hossain. Landfills typically are kept covered and dry in order to limit methane emissions, said Hossain, an associate professor of civil engineering and internationally renowned expert on landfill management.

UT Arlington in the News - Friday, December 21, 2012
University of Texas Doubles Electricity Output of Landfill
Green Optimistic.com reported on efforts by UT Arlington engineers to recover methane to double the electricity output of a Denton landfill. Sahadat Hossain and Melanie Sattler, associate professors of civil engineering, funded by a $344,414 city grant, were able to make improvements to the landfill’s gas recovery system.

UT Arlington News Center - Wednesday, December 19, 2012
UT Arlington civil engineers increasing energy created from solid waste
Two UT Arlington civil engineering professors are working with a new imaging system that has doubled the amount of methane gas produced by the city of Denton landfill. The landfill is the first in Texas to implement the Enhanced Leachate Recirculation system. The gas now provides power for about 1,500 Denton households. However, with increased efficiency of ELR operation, the system will be able to power 3,000 homes in the city of 117,000, officials said.

Institutes & Organized Research Centers of Excellence