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From the Editor

Kathryn Hopper

UTArlington Magazine Editor
Kathryn Hopper

One of the highlights of my summer was having my 22-year-old son James show me around Barcelona. He was studying international marketing in the Catalonia capital as part of a study abroad program at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

His first week there he managed to lose his passport and got lost trying to find his hostel. But by the time I visited at the end of his program, he was a pro at the city's metro system and knew the best spots for tapas. On our last night, he gave me an insider's tour of the Magic Fountains of Montjuïc, a spectacular water and light show at the city's largest ornamental fountain.

He is far from the only American college student traveling the globe this year. UTA sends more than 250 students abroad each academic year and our cover story looks at how and why the University is working to increase those ranks. In the past year, UTA has seen a 30 percent increase in study abroad participants in exchange and affiliated programs and a 32 percent rise in advising visits.

For those who have used their passports, there’s a big payoff. In a recent MetLife survey of Fortune 1000 companies, 65 percent termed global awareness “very important” or “essential” for career readiness.

This fall, we had the pleasure of meeting some amazing Mavericks who serve as mayors in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metroplex. Their energy and enthusiasm for their cities is inspiring residents of all ages to get engaged in their communities. The mayors also appreciate their UTA education and eagerly share life lessons with current students when they get back to campus.

We hope you enjoy reading this issue and learning more about the many ways Mavericks are making a difference in their local community and the world. Please share your news and accomplishments. Go Mavs!

– Kathryn Hopper

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