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FEMA Disaster Recovery Assistance Guide
FEMA Contacts
SBA Disaster Assistance in Response to the Coronavirus- UPDATE
DOD will Require Cybersecurity Certification Starting Fall 2020
SBA Modifies Method for Calculating Annual Revenues for Small Businesses
Cybersecurity in the News

GSA'S NEW UNIQUE ENTITY IDENTIFIER TO REPLACE DUNS NUMBER

SBA UPDATE:

The Governor of Texas has submitted the Disaster Request package to the SBA. Business owners can now apply online in the Disaster Loan Application Portal at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/.  The electronic loan application will be screened by the SBA processing center when it is received.  

FOR ALL APPLICATIONS THE FOLLOWING ITEMS MUST BE SUBMITTED.

  • Loan application (SBA Form 5), completed and signed (this is electronic/online in the portal)
  • Tax Information Authorization (IRS Form 4506-T), completed and signed by each applicant, each principal owning 20 percent or more of the applicant business, each general partner or managing member; and, for any owner who has more than 50 percent ownership in an affiliate business. Affiliates include, but are not limited to, business parents, subsidiaries, and/or other businesses with common ownership or management
  • Complete copies, including all schedules, of the most recently filed Federal income tax returns for the applicant business; an explanation if not available
  • Personal Financial Statement (SBA Form 413) completed, signed, and dated by the applicant, each principal owning 20 percent or more of the applicant business, and each general partner or managing member
  • Schedule of Liabilities listing all fixed debts (SBA Form 2202 may be used)

 All of these forms are available in the Disaster Loan Application Portal. 

 For program questions or assistance in completing the application online, businesses can contact the SBA Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955.

Please periodically check the SBA website for more information: www.sba.gov/disaster

The SBA encourages small businesses to apply for SBA Disaster Assistance

https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/disaster-assistance

 

If you have additional questions, call Toll Free 1-800-659-2955/  TTY: 1-800-877-8339 /e-mail:  disastercustomerservice@sba.gov

 

SBA Disaster Assistance in Response to the Coronavirus

  • The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering designated states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Upon a request received from a state’s or territory’s Governor, SBA will issue under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan declaration.
  • Any such Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance declaration issued by the SBA makes loans available to small businesses and private, non-profit organizations in designated areas of a state or territory to help alleviate economic injury caused by the Coronavirus (COVID-19).
  • SBA’s Office of Disaster Assistance will coordinate with the state’s or territory’s Governor to submit the request for Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance.
  • Once a declaration is made for designated areas within a state, the information on the application process for Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance will be made available to all affected communities as well as updated on our website: SBA.gov/disaster.
  • SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans offer up to $2 million in assistance per small business and can provide vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing.
  • These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses without credit available elsewhere; businesses with credit available elsewhere are not eligible. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%.
  • SBA offers loans with long-term repayments in order to keep payments affordable, up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower’s ability to repay.
  • SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans are just one piece of the expanded focus of the federal government’s coordinated response, and the SBA is strongly committed to providing the most effective and customer-focused response possible.
  • For additional information, please contact the SBA disaster assistance customer service center. Call 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.
  • Visit SBA.gov/disaster for more information.
 

DOD will Require Cybersecurity Certification Starting Fall 2020

It’s not too soon to start thinking about those New Year’s resolutions. Along with other personal goals, federal contractors might want to add a cybersecurity resolution to their list. The Department of Defense has drafted a cybersecurity certification that will be finalized in January 2020. Starting next fall, contractors will have to be certified in order to submit proposals on defense solicitations. Read on for some of the highlights.

 The Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification, or CMMC, is designed to “review and combine various cybersecurity standards and best practices and map these controls and processes across several maturity levels that range from basic cyber hygiene to advanced.” It adds to the safeguards for covered defense information that have been implemented under the existing DFARS 252.204-7012. This regulation provides procedures for adequate security and reporting of cyber incidents.

The new certification will require “certified independent 3rd party organizations to conduct audits” of federal contractors. But the requirements will be proportional to the size of the contractor, with the goal to be “cost-effective and affordable for small businesses to implement at the lower CMMC levels.”

You can take a look at the current version of the CMMC; it will be updated until finalized in January 2020, with the next update scheduled for November. RFPs will start requiring this certificate next fall.

The CMMC site includes a list of FAQ’s and other information that you should check out, but here are the highlights.

  • Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) is the umbrella term for unclassified information that the government has declared needs safeguarding. It includes things like defense and critical infrastructure, but also information about natural and cultural resources and tax. This is separate from requirements for classified information.

  • DOD will add CMMC to the requirements section of solicitations and use it for a “go / no go decision.”

  • CMMC will unify various cybersecurity control standards including NIST standards such as the SP 800-171 recommendations for Protecting Controlled Unclassified Information in Nonfederal Systems and Organizations.

  • DOD will require contractors to hire a third independent third party commercial certification organization to perform a CMMC assessment based on the type of contracts the company will perform and then receive a certificate. No self-certification is allowed. However, the cost of certification will be considered an allowable, reimbursable cost.

  • The requirement will apply to all prime contractors and subcontractors, whether or not they work with CUI.

  • There are five increasing levels of cybersecurity ranging from basic to highly advanced. The practices are spread across 18 domains, such as Access Control, Personnel Security, and System and Information Integrity. Examples of Level 1 security practices include anti-virus and ad hoc incident response. Level 5, in contrast, includes things like real-time asset tracking and a 24×7 security operations center.

As you can see, these requirements are robust but there is a sliding scale based on what level of information a contractor will work with. Your company will need to get familiar with these requirements if it does any work with the DOD.

DOD is encouraging public comment. So check out the information and let DOD how they can implement this requirement in the most efficient way possible. We’ll keep you updated on any major changes in the CMMC here at SmallGovCon

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SBA Modifies Method for Calculating Annual Revenues for Small Businesses

 NEWS RELEASE 
Release Date: Dec. 9, 2019                        Contact: Tiffani.Clements@sba.gov
Release Number: 19-61                            Follow on Twitter, Facebook, Blogs & Instagram

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Small Business Administration today published in the Federal Register a final rule to modify its method for calculating annual revenues used to prescribe size standards for small businesses. The final rule is effective Jan. 6, 2020.

The SBA changed its regulations on the calculation of annual revenues from a three-year averaging period to a five-year averaging period, outside of the SBA Business Loan and Disaster Loan Programs. The change in the averaging period for calculating annual average revenues from three years to five years may result in firms regaining or retaining their small business status. To assist small businesses with this change, the SBA is providing a two-year transition period while firms subject to the change may choose either a three-year averaging period or a five-year averaging period.

This final rule implements the Small Business Runway Extension Act of 2018, Public Law No.115-324, which changed the requirements for proposed size standards prescribed by an agency without separate statutory authority to issue size standards. The intent of the law was to allow small business government contractors more time to prepare for the transition to the full and open market after they exceed the size standard.

While the law changed the averaging period for calculating annual revenues of businesses in services industries from three years to five years, the law did not address the averaging period for calculating the size of other businesses. To promote consistency, the SBA is adopting a five-year averaging period for all of the SBA’s and other agencies’ revenue-based size standards, regardless of whether the industry is for services.

As noted above, this change will not apply to the SBA Business Loan and Disaster Loan Programs. The SBA will seek comment, through a separate rulemaking, on the appropriate averaging period for the SBA Business Loan and Disaster Loan Programs.

For more information about the SBA’s revisions to its small business size standards for various industry sectors, visit  http://www.sba.gov/size.   
 ______________________________________________________

Calculation of Annual Receipts – Final Rule Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. What led to this change?

The final rule implements the Small Business Runway Extension Act of 2018, Public Law No.115-324, which changed the requirements for proposed size standards prescribed by an agency without separate statutory authority to issue size standards. The intent of the law is to allow small business government contractors more time to prepare for the transition to the full and open market after they exceed the size standard.

  1. When does the change take effect?

The change becomes effective on January 6, 2020. The change includes a transition period until January 6, 2022. During the transition period, firms can choose between a 3-year average and a 5-year average.

  1. How could it benefit small businesses?

When annual revenues are in an increasing trend, the 5-year average receipts would generally be lower than the 3-year average receipts. Thus, the change in calculation of average receipts from a 3-year averaging period to a 5-year averaging period would enable small businesses that have just exceeded their size standards to regain their small business status and to benefit from small business assistance. It would also enable small businesses that are about to exceed their size standards to remain small for a longer period of time.

  1. What are the SBA programs that are impacted by this rule change?

The change affects certifications for and/or applications to all SBA’s government contracting programs to include 8(a) business development, HUBZone, Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB), Economically Disadvantaged Women-Owned Small Business (ED/WOSB), and Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) programs. However, SBA’s business loan and disaster loan programs are not impacted.

  1. How does it impact me if I am looking for government contracts as a small business?

Generally, by allowing businesses to build their infrastructure and resources the 5-year revenues average would provide small businesses more time to prepare for a successful transition to the full and open market. 

  1. How does it impact my size status if I am looking for an SBA loan?

It has no impact on applications to SBA business and disaster loan programs as the final rule exempt those programs from the 5-year averaging period. SBA will pursue separate rulemakings on calculating average receipts for those programs. In the interim, those programs will continue to use a 3-year average.

  1. How should I calculate the 5-year average revenues?

Five-year average revenues of a small business that has been in business for 5 or more completed fiscal years means the total revenues of the small business over its most recently completed 5 fiscal years divided by 5.

  1. How should I calculate the 5-year average revenues if I am in business for less than 5 years? 

Five-year average revenues of a small business that has been in business for less than 5 complete fiscal years means the total revenues for the period the small business has been in business divided by the number of weeks in business, multiplied by 52.

  1. What if I am small under the 3-year receipts but large under the 5-year revenues average?

When annual revenues are in a decreasing trend, the 5-year average revenues could be higher than the 3-year average revenues. Thus, under such circumstances, the change in calculation of revenues from a 3-year averaging period to a 5-year averaging period may cause some advanced small businesses close to their size standards to lose their small business status or have their small business status shortened. To mitigate such impacts on small businesses, SBA is providing a transition period through Jan. 6, 2022 to allow businesses to select either the 5-year revenues average or the 3-year revenues average. After the transition period, all certifications will be based on the 5-year revenues average.

  1. What’s the impact on businesses in the System for Award Management (SAM)?

SBA is working with SAM developers to implement this change in SAM.

  1. How does this change affect the averaging period for calculating the number of employees?

The final rule only changes the averaging period for calculating annual revenues, but not for calculating the number of employees. Thus, the averaging period for calculating the number of employees remains at 12 months.

  1. What is the transition period?

For a smooth transition to the 5-year revenue average, SBA is providing a 2-year transition period through Jan 6, 2022. During the transition period, businesses can use either a 5-year or 3-year revenues average.

  1. How does the change affect the definition of small business for other agencies?

The final rule also applies to other agencies’ size determinations when using SBA’s revenue-based size standards.

  1. How does the change affect size status for subcontracts?

The final rule, including the transition period, also applies to subcontractors.

  1. What occurs if the effective date of the change is after the date when initial offers for an open solicitation are due?

Size certifications submitted prior to January 6, 2020, must utilize a 3-year average. SBA determines size as of the date the small business submits a written self-certification that it is small as part of its initial offer, which includes price.

About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration makes the American dream of business ownership a reality. 

As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. 

It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.  

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FEMA Information

Click the link below for a downloadable FEMA Disaster Recovery Assistance Guide:

DISASTER RECOVERY ASSISTANCE GUIDE

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FEMA Contacts

 

 

 

 

 

 Region

States Covered

Region POC

Email

I

Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island

Ryan Colgan

 

 

 

Twalla Gray

ryan.colgan@fema.dhs.gov 

 

Twalla.Gray@fema.dhs.gov 

II

Puerto Rico, New York, New Jersey, US Virgin Islands

Tiffany Strickland

 

 Merlys Aviles

tiffany.strickland@fema.dhs.gov

 

merlys.aviles@fema.dhs.gov 

III

Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia

Valerie Panacio

valerie.panacio@fema.dhs.gov 

IV

Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida

Annette Wright

Annette.Wright@fema.dhs.gov 

V

Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan

Jason Quigley

jason.quigley@fema.dhs.gov 

VI

New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana

Andrea Tubbs

andrea.tubbs@fema.dhs.gov 

VII

Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri

Stephanie Linder

Stephanie.Lindner@fema.dhs.gov 

VIII

Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado, Utah

Joe Gatlin

joseph.gatlin@fema.dhs.gov 

IX

California, Nevada, Arizona, Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Marina Islands, Marshall Islands, Palan, Midway Islands, Federal States of Micronesia

Sable Williams

joseph.gatlin@fema.dhs.gov 

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Cybersecurity in the News

FBI Issues Formal Warning on Massive Malware Network Linked to Russia

Please click the link to access this article from TheHill.com: 

https://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/389366-fbi-issues-formal-warning-of-massive-malware-network-linked-to-russia

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GSA'S NEW UNIQUE ENTITY IDENTIFIER TO REPLACE DUNS NUMBER



The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) is making changes to the unique entity identifier (UEI) that is used to do business with the federal government. Currently, GSA uses the proprietary D-U-N-S® number as the unique entity identifier for doing business with the government. We are moving to a new, non-proprietary identifier that will be requested in, and assigned by, the System for Award Management (SAM.gov).

An announcement has been· posted in the Federal Register to give notice about the new UEI which includes the final technical specification for the identifier standard.

Further information about the unique entity ID can be found here: gsa.govlentityid.

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