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In the News 2014

October

NSF grant helps to diversify STEM field

Friday, October 31, 2014

A new National Science Foundation grant will support a dozen University of Texas at Arlington doctoral students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, also known as STEM fields, with free tuition and a $30,000 yearly stipend for two years, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. The $974,250 in funding for UTA’s Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowships comes from the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation program at the NSF.

Global influence

Thursday, October 30, 2014

U.S. News and World Report named The University of Texas at Arlington to its inaugural rankings of the world’s Best Global Universities. UT Arlington tied with St. Petersburg State University in Russia for No. 433. Harvard University topped the list. The ranking is based on schools’ academic research and reputation.

Educator of the year

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The Dallas Morning News reported that the Tarrant County Asian American Chamber of Commerce recently named UT Arlington Electrical Engineering Professor J.-C. Chiao its Educator of the Year.

Former student honored

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

William Hernandez, a UT Arlington College of Engineering alumnus and one of the first two athletes to attend UT Arlington on a wheelchair basketball scholarship in 1989, has been honored with the 2014 Lex Frieden Employment Award, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. The award, named for the professor and disability rights activist, is given out by the Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities. Hernandez is co-founder of Per4Max, a small maker of sports wheelchairs. UTA Movin’ Mavs Wheelchair Basketball Coach Doug Garner nominated Hernandez for the award.

Vapor analysis

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The National Science Foundation recently awarded Yuze Alice Sun, a UT Arlington assistant professor of electrical engineering, a $400,369 grant for the three-year development of a handheld device that is designed to examine patients’ breath in order to identify the presence of dangerous gases, BioNews Texas reported. Even though the device aims to improve prevention of respiratory diseases, it may also have environmental and security-related uses as well.

Students win app contest

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Three University of Texas at Arlington Computer Science and Engineering students have won a $10,000 prize in the NTx Apps Challenge for a smart traffic light network that adjusts traffic light schedules to make traffic flow more efficient, ECN Mag.com and Informed Infrastructure reported.

Engineering alum

Monday, October 27, 2014

A Forbes article about chief executive officers who reported record quarterly earnings last week featured Charles Liang, CEO and chairman of Super Micro Computer, Inc. Liang earned his master’s degree in electrical engineering at UT Arlington. Last week, his company reported quarterly earnings of $443 million and net income of $20.9 million, a 43.5 percent and 171 percent improvement year over year, respectively. Liang’s 7.35 million shares — 16 percent of the company — increased in value from $176 million to $226 million, a $50 million jump.

Gridlock stopper

Monday, October 27, 2014

University of Texas at Arlington Computer Science and Engineering students Zedd Mekhaiel, James Staud and Nhat Trahave have won a $10,000 prize in the NTx Apps Challenge, PCC Mobile Broadband reported. The “GridLock” smart traffic light network app adjusts traffic light schedules to make traffic flow more efficient.

Improving sustainability

Friday, October 24, 2014

The National Science Foundation awarded a four-year, $1.2 million grant to D.J. Seo, associate professor of water resources engineering in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Texas at Arlington, to use data to improve sustainability of large urban areas, the American Planning Association news website reported.

Improving suitability and comfort of the prosthetic limb

Friday, October 24, 2014

The U.S. Department of Defense awarded two researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington a $744,300 grant from its Peer Reviewed Orthopedic Research Program to support the development of an adaptive interface that is used between a patient’s prosthesis and limb in order to improve suitability and comfort of the prosthetic limb, BioNews Texas reported. The device, which is expected to start clinical applications within the next five years, may help soldiers injured in service. The adaptive interface, which will be similar to an inflatable bubble wrap embedded with sensors, is being developed by Haiying Huanga professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, in collaboration with the principal research scientist at UT Arlington’s Research Institute, Muthu Wijesundara. 

Keeping banks safe

Thursday, October 23, 2014

A University of Texas Arlington associate professor has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to identify insider risk and develop proper protection strategies for information systems within a financial institution, Phys.org and 4-traders.com reported. Jingguo Wang, an associate professor in the Information Systems and Operations Management Department, received a three-year, $157,481 grant that’s part of a larger $499,766 NSF grant with the University of Buffalo.

Improving care

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient’s limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Today’s Medical Developments reported. Haiying Huang, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at UT Arlington’s Research Institute, are collaborating on the project. 

A sustainable future

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A UT Arlington water resources engineer has been awarded a four-year, $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to improve sustainability of large urban areas from extreme weather, urbanization and climate change, Phys.org reported. D.J. Seo, associate professor of water resources engineering in the Civil Engineering Department, will lead a team of researchers who will integrate data from advanced weather radar systems, innovative wireless sensors and crowdsourcing of data via cell phone applications to create high-resolution modeling of urban water systems.

In the air

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention, Phys.org reported. Yuze Sun, an assistant professor in electrical engineering, said the device is a nanoscale gas chromatography tool that separates vapors from a person's breath, a room or an area, then detects what harmful vapors are present.

Fatigue focus

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

UT Arlington engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts, Micro Manufacturing.com reported. Haiying Huang, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the new technology and process would be better and more efficient than taking X-rays of an aircraft's wing.  

New project looks at aircraft materials defects micro- and nanoscale levels

Friday, October 17, 2014

UT Arlington engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts, Nanowerk, Phys.org, PDD Net and (e) Science News reported. Haiying Huang, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the new technology and process would be better and more efficient than taking X-rays of an aircraft's wing. The team includes Stathis Meletis, professor and chair of the Materials Science and Engineering Department. They also received a $348,385 grant from the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to purchase two pieces of equipment that will help gauge the wear on these aircraft parts. 

Urban water sustainability

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Dong-Jun Seo, a UT Arlington environmental engineer, has been selected to participate in a $12.5 million National Science Foundation program aimed at creating a more sustainable society, the NSF website, TMCnet, Tech News and several other media websites reported. The multi-grant effort is funded through the Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering (CyberSEES) program.

Wearable interface to make prosthetics more comfortable

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Rehacare.com and News-line reported. Haiying Huang, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at UT Arlington's Research Institute, are collaborating on the project. The interface will resemble an inflatable bubble wrap that will be embedded with sensors.

NASA selects advanced oxygen recovery proposals for spacecraft missions

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, which includes UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, Aerospace Manufacturing and Design reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project is titled: Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis.

Configuring a good fit

Monday, October 13, 2014

UT Arlington researchers Haiying Huang and Muthu Wijesundara have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Orthotics and Prosthetics, Healio and The Edge reported.

Cooling electrons

Monday, October 13, 2014

A UT Arlington researcher has succeeded in cooling electrons without using external sources, Electronics Cooling reported. Using a nanoscale structure, electrons were passed through a quantum well, which keeps the electrons from heating up. This process allowed the electrons to be cooled to -228 degrees Celsius at room temperature. Because the electrons are cold, this results in lower energy consumption amongst electronic devices. Researchers speculate a 10 percent increase in battery life due to less energy consumption. Seong Jin Koh, associate professor of Materials Science & Engineering at UT Arlington, said usually an entire device has to be immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath for this to take place.

Engineering in the News

Friday, October 10, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, the NSF website reported on its home page. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which includes Distinguished Professor Robert Gatchel of Psychology, Professor Mike Manry of Electrical Engineering, Assistant Professor Junzhou Huang of Computer Science & Engineering, and Rosenberger’s IMSE colleagues Professor Victoria Chen and Assistant Professor Li Zeng.

Engineering in the News

Friday, October 10, 2014

UT Arlington researchers Haiying Huang and Muthu Wijesundara have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Medical Xpress reported.

Partnering for game-changing technologies

Thursday, October 9, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, including UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, FIRE News, Parabolic Arc and many other websites reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project is titled "Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis." Professors from the UT Arlington College of Science and College of Engineering are collaborating on the project.

Changing directions

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

A UT Arlington team exploring how neuron growth can be controlled in the lab and, possibly, in the human body has published a new paper in Nature Scientific Reports on how fluid flow could play a significant role, Science360.com, the National Science Foundation's website, reported. AZoNANO,com and R&D Magazine also reported on the research. In a new study co-authored by Samarendra Mohanty, leader of the Biophysics and Physiology Lab in the College of Science, the researchers were able to use microfluidic stimulations to change the path of an axon at an angle of up to 90 degrees. Such knowledge could be essential for advances in understanding and treating spinal cord injuries.

Fueling space exploration

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, including UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, PR Newswire, The Street, Investor Biospace, Reuters and many other websites reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project, run by faculty from the Colleges of Engineering and Science, is titled "Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis."

A plan for health

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, Health Canal.com reported. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which will work for three years on the $374,998 NSF grant titled: "Statistics-based Optimization Methods for Adaptive Interdisciplinary Pain Management."

Test flight missions

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center is expanding operations, with test-flight missions this week from an airport in Port Mansfield on the Texas coast, General Aviation News, the Forney Post and many other media outlets reported. The UT Arlington Research Institute is a part of the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center team that received a Federal Aviation Association designation for testing the unmanned aircraft systems.

UTA research could lead to homeland security and medical advances

Monday, October 6, 2014

UT Arlington researchers say recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, Product, Design & Development, One News Page and NanoDaily reported. In a recently published paper, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by heating nanoparticles composed of lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen until a transparent ceramic is formed. A scintillator refers to a material that glows in response to radiation.

Major award for Coppell teacher, a UT Arlington alum

Monday, October 6, 2014

Mike Yakubovsky, a Coppell High School teacher, was one of six in the world to receive the 2014 National Instruments Excellence in Engineering Education Awards, the Coppell Gazette reported. Yakubovsky is a UT Arlington graduate.

Optimizing data for pain management

Thursday, October 2, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, PhysOrg reported. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which will work for three years on the $374,998 NSF grant titled: "Statistics-based Optimization Methods for Adaptive Interdisciplinary Pain Management."

Cooling electrons for energy efficiency

Thursday, October 2, 2014

A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington has developed a method to cool electrons to extremely low temperature without external power, a development that may enable electronic devices to work with extremely low power, according to Electronics360. The UT Arlington team – lead by Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor at the Material Science Department – discovered a process to lower the excitation of electrons by passing the particles through a quantum well.

New method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

A UT Arlington research team says recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, according to NSF Science 360, Engineering.com, R&D Magazine and Science Newsline. In a paper published in Optics Letters, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by heating nanoparticles composed of lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen until a transparent ceramic is formed. A scintillator refers to a material that glows in response to radiation.

Beaks of birds inspires creation of device to harvest water

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington drew inspiration from an unlikely source — the beaks of the plovers, stilts and other shore birds — when they developed a new type of fog-harvesting device that shows early promise in bringing water to the world’s deserts, according to Civil Engineering, the magazine of the American Society of Civil Engineers. The research was led by Cheng Luo, an engineering professor, and also involves Xin Heng, a doctoral candidate at the school. It was published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Materials & Interfaces.

September

A new way to protect

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

A UT Arlington team says recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, according to HealthCanal, The Tech Journal, Bio-Medicine and Nanotechnology Now. In a paper to be published in the Oct. 1 issue of Optics Letters, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe their new method. Chen is co-director of UT Arlington’s Security Advances Via Applied Nanotechnology, or SAVANT, Center. SAVANT co-director and Physics Professor Andrew Brandt is a co-author on the paper, as well as Alex Weiss, chair of the physics department, and Rasool Kenarangui, senior lecturer in the College of Engineering’s Department of Electrical Engineering.

Wearing your computer

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas have created technology that could be the first step toward wearable computers with self-contained power sources or, more immediately, a smartphone that doesn’t die after a few hours of heavy use, according to R&D News, EIN Newsdesk and Electric Component News. The research included contributions from UT Arlington scientists and taps into the power of a single electron to control energy consumption inside transistors. It was published online in Nature Communications.

Problem pipes

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Jean-Pierre Bardet, UT Arlington professor of engineering and director of the Urban Water Institute, was interviewed on CBS Radio KNXAM in Los Angeles about aging cast iron water pipes and a rash of recent water main breaks in the area. He said steps must be taken to make the system more resilient while balancing costs. “It’s expensive to replace so many miles of pipe and usually it’s a better strategy to prioritize the weakest link,” he said.

Innovation Nation

Monday, September 29, 2014

The CBS News series Innovation Nation featured UT Arlington’s Smitha Rao, a research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, electrical engineering professor, and their micro-windmill innovation. The team designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy that could be used for sensors and lights for roads and bridges, and may become a solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging. Host Mo Rocca called the UT Arlington work “the future of the windmill, sleek, high-tech and able to fit on a grain of rice.”

New director for UTARI

Monday, September 29, 2014

A McClatchy Tribune story focused on Mickey McCabe’s 21-year career at the University of Dayton and his recent announcement that he has taken a job as executive director of the UT Arlington Research Institute. University of Dayton President Daniel J. Curran credits McCabe with working to more than double sponsored research at the university over the course of his career. As vice president for research, McCabe implemented programs to encourage and support faculty research initiatives, he said.

Perturbation analysis

Monday, September 29, 2014

Chengkai Li, an associate professor in the UT Arlington computer science and engineering department, has been awarded a $241,778 National Science Foundation grant for his proposal about “perturbation analysis of database queries,” according to TMC.net. He is teaming with Duke University and Stanford University on the joint grant, which is worth more than $1.2 million. Perturbation analysis studies how tweaks of database query templates and parameters affect query results.

Huang wins NSF grant

Monday, September 29, 2014

A UT Arlington computer and data scientist has won a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a scalable data-mining framework that will help manufacturers quickly discover desired materials for building their products, according to the Genetics Times. Junzhou Huang, an assistant professor of Computer Science & Engineering with an expertise in big data and statistical learning, will design scalable algorithms and a computational framework that can search unprecedented volumes of data detailing the complete set of genes present in numerous materials.

Wearable computers

Monday, September 29, 2014

A study conducted at the University of Texas at Dallas, with collaboration from UT Arlington scientists, has created technology that could be the first step toward wearable computers with self-contained power sources or a smartphone that doesn't die after a few hours of heavy use, Hispanic Business, The Cutting Edge and eScienceNews. A study published in Nature Communication said the team has developed a new technology that could reduce energy consumption in mobile devices and computers.

Pipeline project

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

A WaterWorld story about the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure honoring a pipeline project by Tarrant Regional Water District mentioned the involvement of graduate students in civil engineering at UT Arlington. The students evaluated the use of native soils to produce native controlled low-strength material, or CLSM.

Harvesting water

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

UT Arlington Engineering Professor Cheng Luo and his doctoral student, Xin Heng, say their new highly efficient fog collector could help the most parched areas of Saudi Arabia to water-scarce areas of the western U.S., the website Environmental Research Web reported. The team came up with their design after noting how long-billed shorebirds with thin beaks get water. The research is featured in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interface.

National spotlight

Monday, September 22, 2014

A new CBS News series called Innovation Nation will feature UT Arlington’s Smitha Rao, a research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, electrical engineering professor. The team designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred. Their interview with the show is set to air at 10 a.m. Saturday.

Harvesting water

Monday, September 22, 2014

A simple device, invented by UT Arlington researchers and inspired by the beaks of shorebirds, can harvest drops of water from fog and dew, according to Inland News Today and Faithful News. Its developers say it could help drought-prone communities around the world meet their need for drinkable water. Engineering professor Cheng Luo and his doctoral student Xin Heng published their research in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Harvest of water

Thursday, September 18, 2014

A simple device, inspired by the beaks of shorebirds, can harvest drops of water from fog and dew. Its developers say it could help drought-stricken areas around the world or deserts meet their need for drinkable water. University of Texas at Arlington engineering professor Cheng Luo and his doctoral student Xin Heng came up with their design after noting how long-billed shorebirds with thin beaks get water, the Kansas City Post, Cambodian Times, Voice of America online, PortalMundos.com, DailyMe.com, Science Codex and Bio-Medicine reported.

Cool device

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Scientists in Texas have found a method of cooling electrons to nearly absolute zero, and they’ve done it at room temperature, Oil Price.com, Wireless Design & Development magazine, Electronic Products.com, Space Daily.com and Communications of the ACM.org reported. Their discovery could lead to electronic devices that need only about one-tenth as much energy as they do today, thereby dramatically reducing the size and weight of batteries. “We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Texas at Arlington. “Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath.”

On the way up

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi now has an airport and runway in its approved flight ranges, Focus Daily News reported. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range to test and fly unmanned aircraft that includes the Port Mansfield airport. The center, along with the UT Arlington Research Institute, is among six federally designated test sites for unmanned aircraft systems.  

National honors

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will present its President's Awards of Excellence during HACU's 28th Annual Conference Oct. 4-6 in Denver, Colo., Virtual-Strategy.com, Financial Buzz.com and Morningstar.com reported. The 2014 honorees include The University of Texas at Arlington, which earned Outstanding HACU-Member Institution in recognition of excellence in support of HACU’s mission.

Enrollment record

Monday, September 15, 2014

Fall enrollment has reached a new record high at UT Arlington, a Fort Worth Star-Telegram editorial said. Nearly 35,000 students are calling themselves Mavericks this autumn, up 4.8 percent from the previous year. The most notable gains this year were in the engineering college, where more than 6,000 students are now enrolled – a 25 percent increase over fall 2013.

Global MOOCs

Monday, September 15, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington joins the few institutions in the country to participate in a program that gives promising high school students a better chance at excelling in college by offering them introductory-level courses online, for free, IBL Studios Education reported. TheedX initiative is an international movement that aims to make Massive Open Online Courses accessible to millions of eager students all over the globe by partnering with other academic institutions.

Saving energy through cooling

Monday, September 15, 2014

A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy, Controlled Environments magazine and Extreme Tech.com reported. The process involves passing electrons through a quantum well to cool them and keep them from heating. "We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature. Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the UT Arlington Materials Science & Engineering Department, who led the research.

New runway

Monday, September 15, 2014

The Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi now has an airport and runway in its approved flight ranges, AviationPros.com reported. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range to test and fly unmanned aircraft that includes the Port Mansfield airport. The center, along with the UT Arlington Research Institute, is among six federally designated test sites for unmanned aircraft systems.  

Coal research

Friday, September 12, 2014

UT Arlington is among six universities with coal research projects that the U.S. Department of Energy has selected to help seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of coal resources, IM-Mining.com reported.

Cooling electrons

Friday, September 12, 2014

A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy, ECNmag.com, Nanotechnology Now, PDDnet.com, New Energy and Fuel.com and Wireless Designmag.com reported. The process involves passing electrons through a quantum well to cool them and keep them from heating. "We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature. Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the UT Arlington Materials Science & Engineering Department, who led the research.

New runway

Friday, September 12, 2014

The Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi now has an airport and runway in its approved flight ranges, the Forney Post reported. The Federal Aviation Administration recently approved a new range to test and fly unmanned aircraft that includes the Port Mansfield airport. The center, along with the UT Arlington Research Institute, is among six federally designated test sites for unmanned aircraft systems.  

Reaching new heights

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Fall enrollment at The University of Texas at Arlington continues to set records, as enrollment has hit a new high of nearly 35,000, the Dallas Business Journal, Fort Worth Business Press, WBAP/820 AM, KLIF/550 AM and CultureMap Dallas reported. Engineering, education and nursing programs are fueling most of that growth. “We’ve been focusing on areas where there’s a workforce need. And, we’ve really been meeting those workforce needs. Students who come here know they’re going to get jobs,” UT Arlington President Vistasp Karbhari said in an interview with KXAS/NBC 5.

Keeping it cool

Thursday, September 11, 2014

A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to -228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy, the National Science Foundation, Science360.gov, eScience News and Opli.net reported. The process involves passing electrons through a quantum well to cool them and keep them from heating. "We are the first to effectively cool electrons at room temperature. Researchers have done electron cooling before, but only when the entire device is immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath,” said Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the UT Arlington Materials Science & Engineering Department, who led the research. Nanowerk.com, Hispanic Business.com, Science Newsline, Science Codex, Science Daily and R&Dmag.com also reported on the new research.

Cleaner coal

Thursday, September 11, 2014

UT Arlington is among six universities with coal research projects that the U.S. Department of Energy has selected to help seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of coal resources, Hispanic Business.com reported. A nearly $400,000 award over the next three years will help UT Arlington to develop low-cost distributed condition monitoring of coal-fired boilers through materials development, sensor design, and wireless flexible antennae sensor arrays. The sensors will be designed to detect soot accumulation and to monitor temperature and strain of steam pipes. 

Advancing heart health

Thursday, September 11, 2014

In a story about a million-dollar pilot study to assess new regimens for peripheral vascular disease, BioNews-TX.com reported that a member of the faculty at UT Arlington has partnered with the American Heart Association in the development of a breakthrough method in nanomedicine, which involves stimulating analogous stem cells to form stents in patients’ blood vessels. Kytai Nguyen, a bioengineering associate professor at UT Arlington, received the grant last year to fund her research. The new study involves the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio.

Enrollment record

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

KRLD/1080 AM interviewed UT Arlington President Vistasp Karbhari about enrollment at the University, which has hit a record high of nearly 35,000 students. That’s up 65 percent since 2001. The growth is driven largely by engineering, which has 6,000 students – a 25 percent jump compared to this time last year. “Most of this has really been fueled by workforce needs that we have in the North Texas area and across the nation,” Karbhari said. “Our College of Engineering, across all departments, has been able to move very quickly to meet those needs.” Enrollment in the business, education and nursing programs is up, too.

Coal research

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

UT Arlington is among six universities with coal research projects that the U.S. Department of Energy has selected to help seek long-term solutions for the clean and efficient use of coal resources, Energy Central and Energy Industry Today reported. A nearly $400,000 award over the next three years will help UT Arlington to develop low-cost distributed condition monitoring of coal-fired boilers through materials development, sensor design, and wireless flexible antennae sensor arrays. The sensors will be designed to detect soot accumulation and to monitor temperature and strain of steam pipes. 

College rankings

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Despite falling a spot in this year’s U.S. News & World Reportcollege rankings, Rice University remained the only Texas university to crack the top 20, the Texas Tribune reported. UT Arlington continues to rank fifth among national universities for undergraduate diversity, according to the report. UT Arlington ranked No. 100 among the nation’s best undergraduate engineering programs and in the top 140 of undergraduate business programs.

Better materials through genome network

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

A UT Arlington computer and data scientist has won a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a scalable data-mining framework that will help manufacturers quickly discover desired materials for building their products, ECN Mag.com, Congoo News, Hispanic Business.com, Nanowerk.com, Bio-Medicine, TMCnet.com and PDDNet.com reported. Junzhou Huang, an assistant professor of Computer Science & Engineering with an expertise in big data and statistical learning, will design scalable algorithms and a computational framework that can search unprecedented volumes of data detailing the complete set of genes present in numerous materials. The innovation may aid manufacturers in building better, longer-lasting cell phones, satellites or aircraft parts, Huang said.

Offshore wind energy

Monday, September 8, 2014

The Dallas Morning News quoted Wei-Jen Lee, a UT Arlington professor of electrical engineering, in an article about the development of offshore wind power in the U.S. “Eventually offshore wind will be part of the picture. In the long run, the renewable energy price is going to come down and fossil fuels are going to go up. They’re going to coexist,” Lee said in an interview last year. “The bottom line is it comes down to the price of electricity, and right now electricity is cheap.” According to a new study, the federal government needs to reduce bureaucratic red tape and enact greater regulation if wind power is going to develop in the U.S. The article also appeared on the National Wind Watch website, wind-watch.org.

Keeping your information safe from online hackers

Friday, September 5, 2014

Matthew Wright, a UT Arlington associate professor of computer science and engineering, said deciding on unusual passwords or opting for a password manager are options for computer security in cloud computing, WFAA Channel 8 reported in a story about the recent hacking incident in which several Hollywood stars' private photos were pilfered.

Freshmen to get research experience

Thursday, September 4, 2014

UT Arlington is launching the ASSURE program this fall, BioNews Texas reported. ASSURE is Achieving Success through Undergraduate Research and Engagement, a program aimed at getting freshmen involved in research.

UT Arlington Research Institute gets new leader

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Mickey McCabe, vice president for research at the University of Dayton in Ohio and executive director of the University of Dayton Research Institute, has been appointed executive director of University of Texas at Arlington’s Research Institute in Fort Worth, the Fort Worth Business Press, the Dallas Business Journal, the Chicago Business Journal, WSMV 4 in Nashville, Tenn., WFLX Fox 29 in West Palm Beach, Fla., KFMB CBS 8 in San Diego and many other websites reported.

Industry partner

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Walmart is using its size and buying power to fuel a “Made in the U.S.A.” movement that can generate jobs for Americans and spark an economic revival in local communities, Mass Market Retailers reported. Part of that effort was awarding several grants to research universities last month. UT Arlington received a Walmart grant to develop a novel manufacturing system that will autonomously prepare small motor subsystems and assemble the motor components.

Micro-windmill power

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

A UT Arlington research associate and electrical engineering professor have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, Encore reported. Smitha Rao, the research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, the electrical engineering professor, have designed the system.

UTA teams with APD to research UAVs

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

UT Arlington and the Arlington Police Department are working together to research unmanned aerial vehicles for use in the public during search and rescue missions, NBC 5 KXAS reported. UT Arlington also has started a UAV certification program for students.

Big possibilities of tiny windmills

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

A team of researchers from UT Arlington announced recently that they had developed a prototype of a wind turbine that might deliver electricity in tiny bursts to devices like smartphones, the Star Tribune and the News of the Weird reported. The windmills are less than half the size of a grain of rice.

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