Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

In the News 2014

July

A problem foundation

Thursday, July 31, 2014

KXAS/NBC 5 included a previously recorded interview with Sahadat Hossain, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, for its consumer investigation follow-up report into one homeowner’s 3-year fight with a major homebuilder. “Everything suggests they have a problem,” Hossain initially said of foundation cracks in the home he reviewed. The homebuilder recently enlisted a residential warranty company to examine the claims. They agreed there are issues and repairs will be made.

Big idea for tiny technology

Thursday, July 31, 2014

KERA/90.1 FM (NPR) and the KERA.org Breakthroughs blog featured research on micro-windmills that could harvest enough energy to recharge cell phones. The researchers, UT Arlington electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao, and research assistant Smitha Rao, have created the micro-windmills, which are just half the size of an ant. The piece also aired on StateImpact, a reporting project of National Public Radio member stations.

A valuable contribution

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The Burleson Star published a letter to the editor about scholarships, success and philanthropy that was written by Dylan Spurrier, a UT Arlington engineering student. The undergraduate recently received a scholarship from Burleson-based Bennett Building Systems. “Though there is no direct nominal return on local philanthropy, your contribution to your community will grease the machine that drives us forward,” Spurrier wrote, adding that he is working to establish a scholarship fund in UT Arlington’s College of Engineering. 

Tiny windmill, big idea

Monday, July 28, 2014

J.-C. Chiao, Jenkins Garrett Professor of Electrical Engineering at UT Arlington, appeared on Al Jazeera America’s “Real Money with Ali Velshi” to discuss his research of tiny windmills that can harness wind to power items like cell phones. “We believe in the future that we can either use this device to power up small devices or we can use an array of them to generate enough power to power industries directly,” Chiao said.

Engineering professors awarded $610k grant by NSF ABI

Thursday, July 24, 2014

UT Arlington computer science and engineering professors Heng Huang and Chris Ding have been awarded a $610,392 grant by the NSF ABI (Advances in Biological Informatics) program to fund a three-year project focused on designing an interactive database of gene expressions of the fruit fly, the websites BioNews Texas and PhysOrg reported. The project is expected to yield methods of analyzing data that will aid in biomedical science and engineering, systems biology, clinical pathology, oncology and pharmaceuticals.

Improving lives with robots

Thursday, July 17, 2014

WOAI News 4 in San Antonio reported that Michael Crawford, a 23-year-old Army specialist, discovered Wednesday that he is getting a brand new, free smart home from HEB grocery store. Robotics specialists at UT Arlington are helping with the design of the smart home.

Revved up learning

Monday, July 14, 2014

NBC 5/KXAS and CBS 11/KTVT reported on UT Arlington's formula racing program, which is ranked No. 1 in the country and No. 5 in the world. The team hosted its 14th annual Texas Autocross Weekend Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Schools from across North America attended.

UAVs and the FAA

Monday, July 14, 2014

Brian Huff, an associate professor of engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington, said the FAA’s criteria on recent rules should be based on whether hobbyists are keeping unmanned aerial vehicles safe, the Houston Chronicle, the Pendleton (Ind.) Times-Post, seattlepi.com, the Washington Times, McClatchey DC and several other media outlets reported. The story first appeared in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Tiny windmills for the future

Monday, July 14, 2014

Micro-windmills could supply one of the answers to mobile energy in the future, Ever Widening Circles reported. The article mentioned the work of UT Arlington electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao and research assistant Smitha Rao, who have created the micro-windmills, which are 1.8 millimeters wide at their widest point.

New FAA rules

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Brian Huff, an associate professor of engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington, was featured in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram story about the FAA’s recent efforts to clarify its rules for flying model aircraft. “To me the criteria should be if it is being operated in a safe and appropriate manner rather than if it is being used for sport and recreation,” Huff said. The story also appeared in other McClatchy newspapers such as the Modesto Bee

Stadium cracks

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

KTVT/CBS 11 interviewed Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, about allegations that Allen ISD knew about cracks in its $60 million stadium but waited to fill them. Chao said not filling the cracks could lead to water leaking in and causing structural damage.

Fine-tuning ahead of a racing weekend at UT Arlington

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington student Formula SAE racing team has fine-tuned its Active Aero technology for the 14th Annual Texas Autocross Weekend July 11-14 on the UT Arlington campus, the website HispanicBusiness.com reported. Student engineers have incorporated four on-board computers instead of the single computer used in 2013 to enable the car to respond more quickly and easily than before.

Hazard mitigation

Monday, July 7, 2014

A three-year, $250,000 National Science Foundation grant will match six undergraduate students with a Spanish technical institute so they can learn how to prepare civil infrastructure for natural, manmade and accidental disasters and how to recover quickly from such events, according to PhysOrg. The grant will allow UT Arlington to collaborate with AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Valencia, Spain, on projects aligned with the multi-disciplinary Disaster Mitigation Group at UT Arlington, which Civil Engineering Professor Nur Yazdani leads.

New rules could shape city landfill

Monday, July 7, 2014

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are helping to increase the power-generating capacity of gas capture efforts at the Denton landfill by studying how to add water to the pile to better control decomposition and the production of gas, according to the Denton Record-Chronicle. New landfills will be required to capture two-thirds of their methane and landfill gas by 2023, about 13 percent more than is required under current rules.

UT Arlington students excel at robotics conference in Hong Kong

Monday, July 7, 2014

Two UT Arlington student engineering teams took home first-place honors at a flagship academic conference for robotics in Hong Kong, the 2014 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The team, composed of doctoral student Isura Ranatunga and master’s students Sandesh Gowda and Shweta Hardas, won $1,000 for disarming “land mines” in Portugal in a simulation environment.

Chief appointment for alum

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Leidos Holdings, Inc. appointed Roger Krone as chief executive officer, Investor Point, PRNewswire, Reuters and a host of other media outlets reported. Krone is currently president of Network and Space Systems for The Boeing Company. Krone earned a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology, a master's degree in aerospace engineering from The University of Texas at Arlington and a master of business administration from Harvard Graduate School of Business. Leidos is a 22,000-employee science and technology solutions company.

Detecting bladder cancer

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The National Science Foundation has presented a team of researchers with a $480,000 grant to build a device that uses nanotechnology, combined with a urine test to detect tiny amounts of bladder cancer cells, In Compliance Magazine and Tau Beta Pi's HQ Blog reported. Samir Iqbal, a UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, is the principal investigator on the project. The device would allow for much earlier detection of bladder cancer.

Photonics technologies

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The IEEE Photonics Society's Summer Topicals Meeting series covers emerging topics in photonics science, technology and applications, Laser Focus World reported. "The 2014 Summer Topicals Meeting Series spans a broad range of five emerging photonics technologies and research areas," says conference general chair Weidong Zhou of the Nanophotonics Lab at UT Arlington. "These topics include novel materials and devices, integrated photonics, and systems related to the conference theme of Functional Material Integration & Optical Systems."

June

City branding video includes UTA

Monday, June 30, 2014

UT Arlington is featured in a new branding video for the city of Arlington called “The American Dream City,” The Dallas Morning News reported. Electrical Engineering Professor J.-C. Chiao and Research Associate Smitha Rao are featured in the video.

Test flying can begin at South Texas site

Friday, June 27, 2014

KRWG.org posted video of Federal Aviation Administration-approved drone testing that began this week in south Texas through Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence & Innovation. LSUASC is a consortium of 16 research institutions and private-sector service companies including the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute.  

Laser technology used for drug delivery

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

UT Arlington physics researchers may have developed a way to use laser technology to deliver drug and gene therapy at the cellular level without damaging surrounding tissue, Nanotechnology Now, News Medical.net, Bio-Medicine, Health Canal, Nanowerk.com, e! Science News and other media outlets reported. The method eventually could help patients suffering from genetic conditions, cancers and neurological diseases.  

NSF funds cancer detection research

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

A multi-institutional research team has received a $480,000 National Science Foundation grant to build an inexpensive device that uses nanotechnology and a simple urine test to detect the most miniscule amount of bladder cancer cells in a patient, Medical Design Technology, Phys.org and Nanowerk.com reported.    

FAA approves South Texas testing site

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

The Federal Aviation Administration has given formal approval for an unmanned aircraft testing site near Corpus Christi, the Dallas Business Journal and other media reported. Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence & Innovation has met all federal requirements to begin full operations as a test site, becoming one of only six across the nation. LSUASC is a consortium of 16 research institutions and private-sector service companies including The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute.

City branding video features University

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

The City of Arlington and the Arlington Convention & Visitors Bureau announced the City’s new official brand “Arlington: The American Dream City,” MyArlingtonTX.com reported. Officially launching today, the brand marks the first time that the City and the CVB have aligned in developing an identity for Arlington. A promotional video on the site prominently features images of the UT Arlington campus and interviews with UT Arlington electrical engineers J.-C. Chiao and Smitha Rao. Fort Worth Star-Telegram columnist Bud Kennedy noted that the video highlights the spiraling growth of UT Arlington.

NSF grant funds UTA researcher's bladder cancer detection device

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

A multi-institutional research team has received a $480,000 National Science Foundation grant to build an inexpensive device that uses nanotechnology and a simple urine test to detect the most miniscule amount of bladder cancer cells in a patient, Hispanic Business.com reported. UT Arlington’s Samir Iqbal, an electrical engineering associate professor, has teamed with Young-tae Kim, an associate professor in bioengineering; and Yair Lotan, who is a chaired professor in urology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, to publish their findings in an upcoming issue of Analytical Methods.  

Tiny windmill holds huge possibilities

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

SCPR.org, the website for 89.3 KPCC Southern California Public Radio, reported research out of UT Arlington that could mean powering cell phones with tiny windmills. When tested, the durable, nickel-based windmills withstood strong artificial winds and generated power. The hope is that these petite powerhouses may someday charge portable electronics. The technology is still in the early stage, but a Taiwanese company is already exploring how to get the micro-windmills to market.

Portable brain-mapping device allows researchers to ‘see’ where memory fails student veterans

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Medical Design Technology and BioOptics World reported on a study by UT Arlington Bioengineering Professor Hanli Liu, Associate Professor Social Work Alexa Smith-Osborne, and two other collaborators. The researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks.

Device aids student veterans who have PTSD

Monday, June 23, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks, Photonics.com, Science Daily and PsychCentral.com reported. The study by bioengineering professor Hanli Liu and Alexa Smith-Osborne, an associate professor of social work, and two other collaborators was published in the May 2014 edition of NeuroImage: Clinical

Unmanned systems center now operational

Monday, June 23, 2014

General Aviation News.com and KRWG.org reported that Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center will conduct a series of flight missions this week with the university’s RS-16 unmanned aerial vehicle. This follows an announcement from the Federal Aviation Administration that the Texas UAS research site is the fourth of six to become operational. Research institutions involved include Texas A&M University, Southwest Research Institute, The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute, Texas Tech University and the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Local robotics team competes in Hong Kong

Monday, June 23, 2014

The Asian American Press noted that a team from UT Arlington competed in the mobility event of the 2014 Mobile Microrobotics Challenge, held in Hong Kong from May 31 to June 2, as part of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Other teams that attended this year’s event were from Canada, France, Switzerland and Korea.

Civil engineer believes some Allen Stadium cracks could be fixed

Friday, June 20, 2014

KDFW/Fox 4 interviewed Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, about a new engineering report that says there are more problems than just cracks in Allen ISD’s $60 million stadium. School administrators issued the report Thursday. Chao believes the smaller cracks can be sealed but the larger ones may have to be torn out and then rebuilt. The district said repairs will be made and it hopes to reopen the stadium in time for graduation next May.

Looking to help student veterans

Friday, June 20, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks, Vancouverdesi.com, BioNews Texas, PDDNet.com, Knoxville Times (Tenn.) and Bioscience Technology reported. The study by bioengineering professor Hanli Liu and Alexa Smith-Osborne, an associate professor of social work, and two other collaborators was published in the May 2014 edition of NeuroImage: Clinical

Wind energy could be harnessed to charge cell phone

Thursday, June 19, 2014

In the world of tomorrow, charging your cell phone could be a breeze, National Geographic reported. Last year electrical engineers J-C Chiao and Smitha Rao, and their University of Texas at Arlington team, developed a prototype of a wind turbine—half the size of a grain of rice—that could be integrated into future electronics.

Research aim to help veterans with PTSD

Thursday, June 19, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have successfully used a portable brain-mapping device to show limited prefrontal cortex activity among student veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder when they were asked to recall information from simple memorization tasks, Science Codex, Health Canal, Medical Xpress.com, News Medical.net and ECN Magazine reported. The study by bioengineering professor Hanli Liu and Alexa Smith-Osborne, an associate professor of social work, and two other collaborators was published in the May 2014 edition of NeuroImage: Clinical

Developing countries at risk for exposure to arsenic

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The National Science Foundation news reported that NSF funding will help two University of Texas at Arlington faculty members work with a Texas company to market a more environmentally friendly field analyzer for arsenic in water. Millions worldwide, especially in developing countries, are at risk for chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water.

Professor says small cracks in Allen Stadium could pose future problems

Thursday, June 19, 2014

KTVT/CBS 11 interviewed Simon Chao, a civil engineering associate professor at UT Arlington, about cracks in Allen ISD’s $60 million stadium that went unnoticed following early safety inspections. “One possibility is usually the cracks are very small. You cannot see even from this distance,” Chao said. He believes the cracks have been growing since that first football scrimmage and could start to impact other parts of the stadium. The district is set to release a new report Thursday that is said to contain “shortcomings in the engineering and possibly construction of the stadium.” 

Drone trouble

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Brian Huff, a UT Arlington associate professor of Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering, said a hobbyist who flew his unmanned aerial vehicle over AT&T Stadium, Six Flags Over Texas and Reunion Arena shouldn’t have been flying that high, over highways or over populated areas, KHOU reported based on a WFAA Channel 8 piece. Huff conducts research on UAVs, teaches courses in UAVs and sponsors the student UAV team.

Drone goes down

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Brian Huff, a UT Arlington associate professor of Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering, said a hobbyist who flew his unmanned aerial vehicle over AT&T Stadium, Six Flags Over Texas and Reunion Arena shouldn’t have been flying that high, over highways or over populated areas, WFAA Channel 8 reported. Huff conducts research on UAVs, teaches courses in UAVs and sponsors the student UAV team.

Winning team

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

A multi-disciplinary team of UT Arlington engineering, UT Southwestern Medical Center and UT Dallas management students won first place and the Participants’ Choice Award at this year’s International Emory Global Health Case Competition, BioNews Texas reported. The winning proposal suggests reforming the World Health Organization donor processes and expanding that agency's executive board to include non-governmental organizations, national public health institutes and faith-based organizations.

Guiding lights

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

The June issue of Optics & Photonics News featured work by Samar Mohanty, assistant professor of physics at UT Arlington. Mohanty and graduate student Bryan Black have discovered a way to use low-power, near-IR lasers to guide axons, the long fiber that carries connections for each neuron.

Tiny windmill power

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Researchers at UT Arlington have designed a miniscule windmill with a micro-generator that can be used to recharge mobile devices, CIO reported. Smitha Rao, a university research associate, and J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor, designed the micro-windmills. The two have filed for a patent for the devices, which are about 1.8 mm at their widest point.

Engineering in the News

Monday, June 2, 2014

Personal unmanned aerial vehicles have been grounded by the FAA while the agency plays catch up to technology, KVUE 24 in Austin reported in carrying a WFAA story. Brian Huff, an associate professor in the Industrial Manufacturing & Systems Engineering Department in UT Arlington's College of Engineering, said he believes the FAA is being prudent and safe. Just this year, UT Arlington was granted a Certificate of Authorization from the FAA, which allows the University to fly UAVs at the UT Arlington Research Institute.

 ∧