Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

In the News 2014

January

Origami and engineering

Friday, January 31, 2014

Micro-windmills that UT Arlington researchers designed could some day be used to charge cell phone batteries and provide temporary power for other devices, Boing Boing and EE Journal reported. J.-C. Chiao, an electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a research associate, developed the MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) using recesses similar to the way integrated circuits are manufactured combined with the origami-like self-assembly techniques.

Rail green-lighted

Friday, January 31, 2014

The Texas Transportation Commission has given the green light to forming a high-speed rail commission to oversee a bullet train project between Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas Public Radio reported. TxDOT funded Stephen Mattingly, an associate professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, to study the possibility of connecting all major Texas with high speed rail.

The power of a micro-windmill system

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have designed a micro-windmill system that could make emergency recharges for cell phones as easy as blowing on your phone, Wired reported. Professor J.C. Chiao and Research Associate Smitha Rao of UT Arlington have developed a new windmill technology that could shake up the power industry and make emergency recharges possible. Unlike the industrial giants that sit in off-shore windfarms, these diminutive devices measure just 1.8 millimeters at their widest point and 10 could fit on a grain of rice.

High-speed rail plans in Texas

Thursday, January 30, 2014

KHOU/Channel 11 in Houston reported on high-speed rail plans in Texas and quoted Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, who said there is an increasing likelihood of developing such a system. "There is a strong chance that we could see it within 10 years. However, there is no guarantee... and I would not like to see any public money committed to an endeavor like this until we see that it really is going to happen," he said. The story initially appeared on WFAA/ABC 8.

Rallying for a Rail

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Stephen Mattingly, UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, told WFAA/ABC 8 that there is an increasing likelihood that high-speed rail will come to Texas. "There is a strong chance that we could see it within 10 years. However, there is no guarantee... and I would not like to see any public money committed to an endeavor like this until we see that it really is going to happen," said Mattingly, in advance of a Texas high-speed rail commission being established this week. The WFAA story also ran on KVUE in Austin.

Unmanned systems conference

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Fox 4 at Noon reported on Monday's unmanned systems conference at the UT Arlington Research Institute. The conference focused on on unmanned systems well beyond the known military applications. A major workforce development and training grant also was announced. The Research Institute is participating in the Texas test site program for unmanned aerial vehicles.

The power of micro windmills

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers have developed miniature windmills that could eventually power cell phone batteries and serve other small-use power needs, ThisWeekInFM.com reported. J.-C. Chiao, a UT Arlington electrical engineering professor, and Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, have produced the working micro-windmills.

Test flights

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute received an FAA certificate of authorization last week as part of its efforts to boost unmanned aerial vehicle research and study, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. UT Arlington and several other universities agreed to become part of the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Initiative, which is led by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. That initiative is part of the nationwide effort to get unmanned aerial vehicles airborne by 2015. The Research Institute and Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation hosted an unmanned vehicle conference Monday. The Dallas Morning News also reported on the daylong conference.

Advancing unmanned systems

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute is part of a statewide push to get in on the ground floor of unmanned vehicle research and technology, KTVT/CBS 11, WFAA/Channel 8 and KDFW/Fox 4 reported. The Research Institute and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation sponsored a daylong conference about unmanned vehicles. The Institute secured an FAA certificate of authorization to fly the unmanned aerial vehicles on that campus.

Conference highlights unmanned systems

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

The UT Arlington Research Institute and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce's Center for Innovation hosted a conference Monday on unmanned systems, the Associated Press reported. The AP story was carried by ABC 13 and Fox 26 in Houston, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Austin American-Statesman, the San Antonio Express-News, KSLA 12 in Shreveport, La., KXXV 25 in Waco and many other media websites.

Tiny windmills

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have designed a micro-windmill that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, Accessible Technology and TechNet reported. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Powering up

Monday, January 27, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have designed a MEMS-based "micro-windmill" that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, Oilprice.com and ItThing.com reported. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Mass matters

Monday, January 27, 2014

A UT Arlington engineering professor has proven that the effect of mass is important, can be measured and has a significant impact on any calculations and measurements at the sub-micrometer scale, IPS Cell Therapy and Space Daily reported. The findings help to better understand movement of nano-sized objects in fluid environments. The unconventional results are consistent with Newton's Second Law of Motion, a well-established law of physics, and imply that mass should be included in the dynamic model of these nano-systems. The most widely accepted models omit mass at that scale.

Planning for rail

Monday, January 27, 2014

Bill Meadows, a former Fort Worth City Council member, is expected to chair the high-speed rail commission, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. A Star-Telegram editorial said a UT Arlington study laid out several suggested railway routes. The preferred is along I-30 connecting Dallas, Arlington and Fort Worth.

Micro windmill research continues to capture media's attention

Friday, January 24, 2014

Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have designed a MEMS-based "micro-windmill" that they hope may offer a solution for recharging batteries in mobile devices, the EE Times said in its Power Week-In-Review. The research is being done by research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao.

Bowling's newly published research

Friday, January 24, 2014

BioNews Texas and Space Daily featured research byAlan Bowling, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UT Arlington, and Samarendra Mohanty, an assistant physics professor, on the relationship of mass to calculations at the sub-micrometer scale. Their newly published work says the effect of mass is important, can be measured and has a significant impact on any calculations and measurements.

Micro windmills

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

UT Arlington electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao was interviewed on FOX Business about his work designing a micro-windmill that generates wind energy. Chiao and co-designer Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, believe the devices could be used to charge cell phones or other devices. “You will never run out of energy and you don’t have to go change the battery for those devices,” he said. The websites Electronic Engineering, IT World, Clean Technica, and Technology Tell also reported on the technology.

Need for speed

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

A study by Steve Mattingly, associate professor of civil engineering at UT Arlington, was cited in a Dallas Morning News story focusing on what a high-speed rail system from Dallas to Houston could mean for the environment. Mattingly found the quickest approach for a new system is to put routes along interstate highways.

Alum co-produces new album

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Kelcy Warren, a distinguished alumnus of the UT Arlington College of Engineering, was featured in a Dallas Morning News story about a new album he co-produced called Looking Into You: A Tribute to Jackson Browne. Warren is CEO and chairman of the Fortune 500 titan Energy Transfer Partners.

An energy harvest

Friday, January 17, 2014

UT Arlington research associate Smitha Rao and electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao have designed a micro-wind turbine that generates power and may become an unusual solution to charging cell phone batteries and other small, wireless, or remote sensing devices, the websites The Blaze and Windpower Engineering & Development reported.  Because of the small sizes, flat panels with thousand of windmills also could be made and mounted on the walls of houses or building to harvest energy for lighting, security, or environmental sensing and wireless communication.

Flying high

Friday, January 17, 2014

About two weeks after winning approval as one of only a handful of federal test sites, researchers from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi are putting their unmanned remote-controlled aircraft, or drones, in the air this week for another round of test flights, according to an Associated Press story. Texas is among six states designated by the Federal Aviation Administration to develop test sites for drones and the UT Arlington Research Institute is a partner on the project.

The power of tiny windmills

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Time magazine’s Tech section reported that researchers at The University of Texas Arlington say they have designed tiny windmills that could hook up to a cellphone and convert wind into battery life. The designers, electrical engineering professor J.-C. Chiao and graduate research associate Smitha Rao, drew from traditional origami concepts and modern semiconductor device layouts to create the tiny power plants. Websites such as Computerworld, Men’s Fitness, Network World and the Dallas Observer also reported on the research.

Weather Channel, Discovery Canada report on micro-windmill

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Several news outlets, including The Weather Channel, Discovery Canada, Business Insider, eCampusNews and the websites DVice and Inhabitat, featured stories on tiny windmills being developed by Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor. The team believes the devices could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. Their work also gained attention from additional media based outside the U.S., such as Canadian radio station CJBK/Newstalk 1290 and German website called Mittelstands Nachrichten.

Interaction will be part of research process

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

A new Research and Learning Center at the Forth Worth Science and History Museum brings research from The University of Texas at Arlington to a science venue that is already a favorite with children, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and KERA/90.1 FM reported. Students from UTA or other universities partnering with the program can apply to use the research center to gather data for investigations that touch on the brain and learning, organizers said at an announcement of its opening Tuesday. KXAS/NBC 5 also reported the announcement in their midday report.

FAA test sites for unmanned systems includes UT Arlington Research Institute

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Just weeks after its designation as one of six federally-approved test sites for unmanned aircraft systems, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi will conduct several test flights over South Texas ranch land to continue research and training on the RS-16 unmanned aerial vehicle, according to a General Aviation News story that also mentioned UT Arlington. The successful FAA test site bid was a team effort involving A&M-Corpus Christi, the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute and others.

Micro-windmill technology could help recharge cell phone batteries

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Numerous news outlets, including The Washington Post, San Antonio Express-News, Houston Chronicle, R&D Magazine, Geek.com, Grist and Tech Investor News reported on a UT Arlington team’s development of micro-windmills that could provide wind energy for cellular phone charging or home energy generation. Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, are working with a Taiwanese company to explore commercialization possibilities for the new technology.

University, FW Museum team up for learning center

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Today, The University of Texas at Arlington and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History will announce a Research and Learning Center at the museum, a collaboration that allows scientists to engage with the public they study, which will invite museum visitors to participate in short research interactions lasting no more than 15 minutes, according to the Fort Worth Business Press. The project will be guided by the University’s Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education. KXAS/NBC 5 also featured a report this morning on the center's opening.

Forbes, many media outlets report on UT Arlington's micro-windmill

Monday, January 13, 2014

Smitha Rao, a UT Arlington research associate, and J.-C. Chaio, an electrical engineering professor, have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy and could become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries constantly in need of recharging and home energy generation where large windmills are not preferred, according to numerous websites, including ForbesElectronic Engineering JournalThe VergeNanotechnology TodayGizmodoCNET and others. UT Arlington has reached an agreement with a Taiwanese company to explore the discovery's commercialization opportunities. KRLD/1080 AM also featured a report on the technology this morning.

University center teaming with Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

Monday, January 13, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History have announced the launch of the Research and Learning Center at the Fort Worth museum. The collaboration allows scientists to interact with the public by enabling museum visitors to participate in short research interactions, the websites PhysOrg and HispanicBusiness.com reported. The Center opens Jan. 14 and is a partnership between the museum and UT Arlington's College of Education. It will be guided by the University's Southwest Center for Mind, Brain and Education.

Magazine story features student racing innovation

Friday, January 10, 2014

Racecar Engineering magazine prominently featured an article written by Bob Woods, UT Arlington professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and graduate student James Merkel, about the University's Formula Team’s engineering innovation. They detailed how UT Arlington has been at the forefront of innovation "with the introduction of a combined hand clutch and shifter mechanism that allows for two pedals and left foot braking, the first introduction of electronic fuel injection, carbon composite wheels, the first full aero package with multi-element wings, several iterations of unsuspended aero packages, and now the first fully-active four-quadrant aerodynamic package.”

Davis outlines education plan

Friday, January 10, 2014

During an education roundtable Thursday at UT Arlington, state Sen. Wendy Davis unveiled a plan to put more teachers in public classrooms throughout the state, the Associated Press, Texas Tribune, Dallas Morning News, Star-Telegram, Houston Chronicle and other media reported.

High-speed rail study noted

Friday, January 10, 2014

CultureMap Dallas and CultureMap Houston mentioned a UT Arlington study exploring high-speed rail options along the state’s highway system in its story about DFW to Houston high-speed rail study being launched by the federal government.

Professor's high-speed rail study cited

Thursday, January 9, 2014

Dallas Morning News story on a DFW to Houston high-speed rail study being launched by the federal government cited a November study by UT Arlington that examined the feasibility of high-speed rail. The study, conducted by Steve Mattingly, associate professor of civil engineering, showed that high-speed rail was more efficient than air and highway travel - no matter which two big cities you were linking, and it was possible using existing TXDOT right-of-way.

Weighty issues

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Authint Mail noted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering that suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter.

Studying a quicker trip

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

D Magazine’s Frontburner noted research by UT Arlington in its story about a DFW to Houston high-speed rail line study being launched by the federal government and the Texas Department of Transportation. Researchers from UT Arlington conducted a study in November 2013 providing benefits of high-speed trains along major Texas highways. KETK/NBC Tyler and other media outlets carried the story.

Collaboration for health

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

A team of advanced mathematicians from UT Arlington is collaborating with UT Southwestern Medical Center and PCCI, a major scientific partner, to develop clinical prediction models using Bayesian modeling approaches, Reuters.com and other media reported. The National Science Foundation grant project is one of three prestigious grants awarded to UTSW exceeding $30 million.

Bolen's contributions

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

The Star-Telegram highlighted the many contributions of late Fort Worth Mayor Bob Bolen that included bringing the former UT Arlington Advanced Robotics Research Institute to Fort Worth. The city’s longest-serving mayor, known for working 60-hour weeks during his tenure in 1982-91, died early Monday. He was 87.

Earth's measurements

Monday, January 6, 2014

Discovery News.com highlighted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, which suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter. Dark matter is thought to make up about 80 percent of the universe’s matter, but scientists have been unable to determine much else about it, including its presence in the solar system. “The nice thing about GPS satellites is that we know their orbits really, really well,” Harris said. From nine months of data on the satellites in the GLONASS, GPS and Galileo groups, he calculated Earth’s mass as “felt” by each one.

Collaboration noted

Monday, January 6, 2014

Newstalk Texas, a blog of the Texas A&M University Real Estate Center, reported that faculty at The University of Texas at Arlington will participate in Federal Aviation Administration-supported research led by Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi for unmanned aerial systems, a project that will help advance the U.S. drone industry.

Kudos for contest win

Monday, January 6, 2014

The Star-Telegram’s Cheers & Jeers column acknowledged a team of UT Arlington undergraduate engineering students that took first place and a $10,000 prize in an AT&T “It Can Wait” coding contest by creating an app that discourages texting and driving.

Measuring the Earth

Friday, January 3, 2014

New Scientist, Business Standard and UPI.com highlighted research by Ben Harris, UT Arlington assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, that suggests the Earth is heavier than thought, perhaps due to an invisible belt of dark matter. Dark matter is thought to make up about 80 percent of the universe’s matter, but scientists have been unable to determine much else about it, including its presence in the solar system. “The nice thing about GPS satellites is that we know their orbits really, really well,” Harris said. From nine months of data on the satellites in the GLONASS, GPS and Galileo groups, he calculated Earth’s mass as “felt” by each one.

Coding contest win

Thursday, January 2, 2014

A team of UT Arlington undergraduate engineering students took first place and a $10,000 prize in an AT&T “It Can Wait” coding contest by creating an app that discourages texting and driving, the Star-Telegram reported. The team — none of them had taken smart phone programming courses — beat out 25 teams in the second annual AT&T Coding Competition that took place during a 12-week period. The Dallas Morning News also reported on the team’s win.

New fuel method

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Fuel Competition.org and Open Fuel Standard.org noted that a method for creating methanol using CO2 and sunlight, developed at The University of Texas at Arlington, uses very little electrical power and can be "scaled up to an industrial scale to allow some of the CO2 emitted from electrical power plants to be captured and converted into" methanol. This would make electric cars even greener because the CO2 generated for electricity is captured and used.

 ∧