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In the News 2014

November

Norman Hackerman awards

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Two UT Arlington researchers were recently awarded Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program awards, BioNews Texas reported. The awards are highly competitive prizes given by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The awards were created to support early-stage basic research that might attract more external funding. Baohong Yuan, associate professor of bioengineering, received a $100,000 grant to improve monitoring of cancer metastasis in deep tissues. Hyeok Choi, an environmental assistant professor of civil engineering, received $80,000 to study photocatalytic decomposition of lethal algal toxins in water resources in Texas.

Social robotics

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

As an actress, producer, director and theatre arts lecturer at The University of Texas at Arlington, Julienne Greer knows the techniques that help draw people’s deepest emotions to the surface. Now, she’s building on her experience and research to help scientists and robotics engineers better understand the human experience so that they can build more responsive robots, Product Design & Development reported.

Social robotics

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

As an actress, producer, director and theatre arts lecturer at The University of Texas at Arlington, Julienne Greer knows the techniques that help draw people’s deepest emotions to the surface. Now, she’s building on her experience and research to help scientists and robotics engineers better understand the human experience so that they can build more responsive robots, ECN Magazine and Science Newsline reported. Greer, who holds a master’s degree in media arts and a doctorate in humanities, recently authored the paper, “Building emotional authenticity between humans and robots.”

Concept to cut carbon emissions

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Bill Simpkin, an 88-year-old former jet and rocket engine engineer, has developed a concept to cut carbon emissions from the country's aged coal plants, The Dallas Morning News reported. His work attracted UT Arlington engineering professor Donald Wilson, who this summer presented Simpkin’s concept to a U.S. Department of Energy team at the Idaho National Laboratory.

Connecting robots with humans

Monday, November 24, 2014

As an actress, producer, director and theatre arts lecturer at The University of Texas at Arlington, Julienne Greer knows the techniques that help draw people’s deepest emotions to the surface. Now, she’s building on her experience and research to help scientists and robotics engineers better understand the human experience so that they can build more responsive robots, Phys.org, eScience News, Science Daily, Nanowerk, Innovation Toronto and many other websites reported.

Comparative politics

Monday, November 24, 2014

UT Arlington is partnering with Duke and Stanford universities in a project that could yield useful results in comparative politics, Poynter.org reported.

Norman Hackerman awards

Friday, November 21, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington has received two highly competitive Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program awards from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Congoo reported. Baohong Yuan, an associate professor in the Department of Bioengineering, received a $100,000 grant to better monitor cancer metastasis in deep tissue. Hyeok Choi, an assistant professor of environmental engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering, received $80,000 to study solar-driven photocatalytic decomposition of lethal algal toxins in Texas water resources.

Water distribution management

Friday, November 21, 2014

J.P. Bardet, UT Arlington civil engineering professor, said Singapore is ahead of the game in managing water distribution in using a network of sensors that detect changes in water pressure, TransHumanTech and New Scientist reported. Much of the world can't readily have a water system with the same efficiencies as Singapore's because their infrastructure isn’t ready for it, Bardet said. 

College of Engineering wins Norman Hackerman Advanced Research awards

Thursday, November 20, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington has received two highly competitive Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program awards from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Phys.org reported. Baohong Yuan, an associate professor in the Department of Bioengineering, received a $100,000 grant to better monitor cancer metastasis in deep tissue. Hyeok Choi, an assistant professor of environmental engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering, received $80,000 to study solar-driven photocatalytic decomposition of lethal algal toxins in Texas water resources.

Warm welcome

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Samir Iqbal, UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, was among local officials welcoming visiting scholars and officials from Pakistani universities, U.S. State Department officials and diplomats from Pakistan at a reception as a part of a South Asian Democracy Watch conference in Dallas, Geo.tv reported.

Dream job

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram featured a story on Kristin Milam, a UT Arlington alum who landed her full-time dream job at Airbus Helicopter in Grand Prairie after she graduated in 2013 with a bachelor’s in aerospace engineering. She is an associate flight-test analysis engineer and is the only woman among the 12 teammates in the experimental flight test department. James Merkel, a UT Arlington graduate and flight-test colleague of Milam, was also quoted in the story.

Trapping cancer cells

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

KOTV/CBS 6 (Tulsa) and television stations in Lubbock and Tyler aired a story on Liping Tang, interim chair of the University of Texas at Arlington’s Bioengineering Department, and his discovery that man-made lymph nodes could act as traps for cancer cells. Tang has received a half million-dollar grant from the U.S. Army to continue his research. The story originally appeared on KTVT/CBS 11.

Trapping cancer cells

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

After spending more than a decade working to manufacture human tissue, Liping Tang, interim chair of the University of Texas at Arlington’s Bioengineering Department, discovered that man-made lymph nodes could act as traps for cancer cells, a story on KTVT/CBS 11 reported. Tang has received a half million dollar grant from the U.S. Army to continue his research. “You can get the loads of bad cells in one small, tiny place, and you can kill it,” he said.

Stem cell generation

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Severely injured soldiers will be getting a huge boost from work getting underway at the University of Texas at Arlington, according to Orthopedics This Week. Liping Tang, a bioengineering professor and interim chair of the bioengineering department, has received a $1.04 million grant from the U.S. Army to work on the regeneration of cartilage tissue and the reduction of posttraumatic osteoarthritis using a patient’s own stem cells.

Computer security

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

A University of Texas at Arlington computer scientist is studying smarter route selection and adaptive cover traffic as ways of protecting computer privacy, according to the website PhysOrg. Matthew Wright, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, was awarded a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to quantify the capabilities of powerful adversaries and develop defenses to overcome them.

Support for minority doctoral students in the STEM fields

Monday, November 10, 2014

A new National Science Foundation grant will support a dozen University of Texas at Arlington doctoral students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, also known as STEM fields, with free tuition and a $30,000 yearly stipend for two years, The Fort Worth Business Press education column reported. The $974,250 in funding for UTA’s Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowships comes from the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program at the NSF.

Cancer decoys

Thursday, November 6, 2014

A UT Arlington bioengineering professor is using tissue-engineered artificial lymph nodes to attract prostate cancer cells to better target and eradicate the disease, according to the websites News-Medical.net and Medical Design Technology. Liping Tang, bioengineering professor and interim chair of the Bioengineering Department, has received a $533,650 U.S. Army grant to build the lymph nodes that attract the cancer cells. “This research tries to stop the cancer before it spreads,” Tang said.

Game-changing technologies

Thursday, November 6, 2014

The University of Texas at Arlington was one of four institutions chosen to receive up to $750,000 over 15 months to design a new oxygen recycling system for NASA, according to Solid State Technology. The technology push is intended to set the stage for human deep space forays, including activities in the cis-lunar realm, near-Earth asteroids and Mars.

New pollution rules

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Melanie Sattler, UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, was featured in a KUHF/News 88.7 FM (Houston Public Media) report on new federal regulation that may be coming for oil and gas well pollution, including a change in regulations on methane leaks. “It’s an issue because we’re now drilling in heavily populated areas,” she said.

Army supports UT Arlington research

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

The U.S. Army has awarded $1.04 million to support research at The University of Texas at Arlington into the use of injectable biodegradable microscaffolding to support cartilage and bone healing with autologous stem cell transplants for the treatment of post-traumatic osteoarthritis, SmartBrief reported. Liping Tang, chair of the UT Arlington Bioengineering Department, is leading the research.

Micro solutions

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Liping Tang, a UT Arlington bioengineering professor and interim chair of the bioengineering department, has received a $1.04 million grant from the U.S. Army that aims to regenerate cartilage tissue and reduce osteoarthritis using a patient's own stem cells, A Woman's Health, Stem Cell Investor and Stem Cell Daily reported. Tang will use microscaffolding injections made of biodegradable polymers to spur the use of the patient’s own stem cells.

Stem cell generation

Monday, November 3, 2014

Liping Tang, a UT Arlington bioengineering professor and interim chair of the bioengineering department, has received a $1.04 million grant from the U.S. Army that aims to regenerate cartilage tissue and reduce osteoarthritis using a patient's own stem cells, Nanowerk.com, Bio-Medicine and BioNews Texas reported. Tang will use microscaffolding injections made of biodegradable polymers to spur the use of the patient’s own stem cells.

Metal fatigue

Monday, November 3, 2014

UT Arlington engineering professors Haiying Huang and Stathis Meletis have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level to provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts, NASA Tech Briefs reported. The two professors also received a $348,385 grant from the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to purchase two pieces of equipment that will help gauge the wear on these aircraft parts.

October

NSF grant helps to diversify STEM field

Friday, October 31, 2014

A new National Science Foundation grant will support a dozen University of Texas at Arlington doctoral students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, also known as STEM fields, with free tuition and a $30,000 yearly stipend for two years, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. The $974,250 in funding for UTA’s Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowships comes from the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation program at the NSF.

Global influence

Thursday, October 30, 2014

U.S. News and World Report named The University of Texas at Arlington to its inaugural rankings of the world’s Best Global Universities. UT Arlington tied with St. Petersburg State University in Russia for No. 433. Harvard University topped the list. The ranking is based on schools’ academic research and reputation.

Educator of the year

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The Dallas Morning News reported that the Tarrant County Asian American Chamber of Commerce recently named UT Arlington Electrical Engineering Professor J.-C. Chiao its Educator of the Year.

Former student honored

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

William Hernandez, a UT Arlington College of Engineering alumnus and one of the first two athletes to attend UT Arlington on a wheelchair basketball scholarship in 1989, has been honored with the 2014 Lex Frieden Employment Award, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. The award, named for the professor and disability rights activist, is given out by the Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities. Hernandez is co-founder of Per4Max, a small maker of sports wheelchairs. UTA Movin’ Mavs Wheelchair Basketball Coach Doug Garner nominated Hernandez for the award.

Vapor analysis

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

The National Science Foundation recently awarded Yuze Alice Sun, a UT Arlington assistant professor of electrical engineering, a $400,369 grant for the three-year development of a handheld device that is designed to examine patients’ breath in order to identify the presence of dangerous gases, BioNews Texas reported. Even though the device aims to improve prevention of respiratory diseases, it may also have environmental and security-related uses as well.

Students win app contest

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Three University of Texas at Arlington Computer Science and Engineering students have won a $10,000 prize in the NTx Apps Challenge for a smart traffic light network that adjusts traffic light schedules to make traffic flow more efficient, ECN Mag.com and Informed Infrastructure reported.

Engineering alum

Monday, October 27, 2014

A Forbes article about chief executive officers who reported record quarterly earnings last week featured Charles Liang, CEO and chairman of Super Micro Computer, Inc. Liang earned his master’s degree in electrical engineering at UT Arlington. Last week, his company reported quarterly earnings of $443 million and net income of $20.9 million, a 43.5 percent and 171 percent improvement year over year, respectively. Liang’s 7.35 million shares — 16 percent of the company — increased in value from $176 million to $226 million, a $50 million jump.

Gridlock stopper

Monday, October 27, 2014

University of Texas at Arlington Computer Science and Engineering students Zedd Mekhaiel, James Staud and Nhat Trahave have won a $10,000 prize in the NTx Apps Challenge, PCC Mobile Broadband reported. The “GridLock” smart traffic light network app adjusts traffic light schedules to make traffic flow more efficient.

Improving sustainability

Friday, October 24, 2014

The National Science Foundation awarded a four-year, $1.2 million grant to D.J. Seo, associate professor of water resources engineering in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Texas at Arlington, to use data to improve sustainability of large urban areas, the American Planning Association news website reported.

Improving suitability and comfort of the prosthetic limb

Friday, October 24, 2014

The U.S. Department of Defense awarded two researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington a $744,300 grant from its Peer Reviewed Orthopedic Research Program to support the development of an adaptive interface that is used between a patient’s prosthesis and limb in order to improve suitability and comfort of the prosthetic limb, BioNews Texas reported. The device, which is expected to start clinical applications within the next five years, may help soldiers injured in service. The adaptive interface, which will be similar to an inflatable bubble wrap embedded with sensors, is being developed by Haiying Huanga professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, in collaboration with the principal research scientist at UT Arlington’s Research Institute, Muthu Wijesundara. 

Keeping banks safe

Thursday, October 23, 2014

A University of Texas Arlington associate professor has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to identify insider risk and develop proper protection strategies for information systems within a financial institution, Phys.org and 4-traders.com reported. Jingguo Wang, an associate professor in the Information Systems and Operations Management Department, received a three-year, $157,481 grant that’s part of a larger $499,766 NSF grant with the University of Buffalo.

Improving care

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient’s limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Today’s Medical Developments reported. Haiying Huang, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at UT Arlington’s Research Institute, are collaborating on the project. 

A sustainable future

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A UT Arlington water resources engineer has been awarded a four-year, $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to improve sustainability of large urban areas from extreme weather, urbanization and climate change, Phys.org reported. D.J. Seo, associate professor of water resources engineering in the Civil Engineering Department, will lead a team of researchers who will integrate data from advanced weather radar systems, innovative wireless sensors and crowdsourcing of data via cell phone applications to create high-resolution modeling of urban water systems.

In the air

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention, Phys.org reported. Yuze Sun, an assistant professor in electrical engineering, said the device is a nanoscale gas chromatography tool that separates vapors from a person's breath, a room or an area, then detects what harmful vapors are present.

Fatigue focus

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

UT Arlington engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts, Micro Manufacturing.com reported. Haiying Huang, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the new technology and process would be better and more efficient than taking X-rays of an aircraft's wing.  

New project looks at aircraft materials defects micro- and nanoscale levels

Friday, October 17, 2014

UT Arlington engineering professors have received a $451,781 Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant to examine the material surface at the micro- and nano-scale level that will provide clues for predicting fatigue in aircraft parts, Nanowerk, Phys.org, PDD Net and (e) Science News reported. Haiying Huang, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said the new technology and process would be better and more efficient than taking X-rays of an aircraft's wing. The team includes Stathis Meletis, professor and chair of the Materials Science and Engineering Department. They also received a $348,385 grant from the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to purchase two pieces of equipment that will help gauge the wear on these aircraft parts. 

Urban water sustainability

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Dong-Jun Seo, a UT Arlington environmental engineer, has been selected to participate in a $12.5 million National Science Foundation program aimed at creating a more sustainable society, the NSF website, TMCnet, Tech News and several other media websites reported. The multi-grant effort is funded through the Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering (CyberSEES) program.

Wearable interface to make prosthetics more comfortable

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Rehacare.com and News-line reported. Haiying Huang, professor in the Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at UT Arlington's Research Institute, are collaborating on the project. The interface will resemble an inflatable bubble wrap that will be embedded with sensors.

NASA selects advanced oxygen recovery proposals for spacecraft missions

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, which includes UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, Aerospace Manufacturing and Design reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project is titled: Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis.

Configuring a good fit

Monday, October 13, 2014

UT Arlington researchers Haiying Huang and Muthu Wijesundara have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Orthotics and Prosthetics, Healio and The Edge reported.

Cooling electrons

Monday, October 13, 2014

A UT Arlington researcher has succeeded in cooling electrons without using external sources, Electronics Cooling reported. Using a nanoscale structure, electrons were passed through a quantum well, which keeps the electrons from heating up. This process allowed the electrons to be cooled to -228 degrees Celsius at room temperature. Because the electrons are cold, this results in lower energy consumption amongst electronic devices. Researchers speculate a 10 percent increase in battery life due to less energy consumption. Seong Jin Koh, associate professor of Materials Science & Engineering at UT Arlington, said usually an entire device has to be immersed into an extremely cold cooling bath for this to take place.

Engineering in the News

Friday, October 10, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, the NSF website reported on its home page. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which includes Distinguished Professor Robert Gatchel of Psychology, Professor Mike Manry of Electrical Engineering, Assistant Professor Junzhou Huang of Computer Science & Engineering, and Rosenberger’s IMSE colleagues Professor Victoria Chen and Assistant Professor Li Zeng.

Engineering in the News

Friday, October 10, 2014

UT Arlington researchers Haiying Huang and Muthu Wijesundara have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient's limb so that the fit and comfort of the prosthetic are improved, Medical Xpress reported.

Partnering for game-changing technologies

Thursday, October 9, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, including UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, FIRE News, Parabolic Arc and many other websites reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project is titled "Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis." Professors from the UT Arlington College of Science and College of Engineering are collaborating on the project.

Changing directions

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

A UT Arlington team exploring how neuron growth can be controlled in the lab and, possibly, in the human body has published a new paper in Nature Scientific Reports on how fluid flow could play a significant role, Science360.com, the National Science Foundation's website, reported. AZoNANO,com and R&D Magazine also reported on the research. In a new study co-authored by Samarendra Mohanty, leader of the Biophysics and Physiology Lab in the College of Science, the researchers were able to use microfluidic stimulations to change the path of an axon at an angle of up to 90 degrees. Such knowledge could be essential for advances in understanding and treating spinal cord injuries.

Fueling space exploration

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

NASA has selected four partners, including UT Arlington, to develop game-changing technologies with the potential to increase the oxygen recovery rate aboard human spacecraft to at least 75 percent while achieving high reliability, PR Newswire, The Street, Investor Biospace, Reuters and many other websites reported. These oxygen recovery and recycling technologies will drive exploration and enable our human journey to Mars and beyond. UT Arlington’s project, run by faculty from the Colleges of Engineering and Science, is titled "Microfluidic Electrochemical Reactor for Oxygen Recovery via Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis."

A plan for health

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, Health Canal.com reported. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which will work for three years on the $374,998 NSF grant titled: "Statistics-based Optimization Methods for Adaptive Interdisciplinary Pain Management."

Test flight missions

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center is expanding operations, with test-flight missions this week from an airport in Port Mansfield on the Texas coast, General Aviation News, the Forney Post and many other media outlets reported. The UT Arlington Research Institute is a part of the Lone Star Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center team that received a Federal Aviation Association designation for testing the unmanned aircraft systems.

UTA research could lead to homeland security and medical advances

Monday, October 6, 2014

UT Arlington researchers say recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, Product, Design & Development, One News Page and NanoDaily reported. In a recently published paper, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by heating nanoparticles composed of lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen until a transparent ceramic is formed. A scintillator refers to a material that glows in response to radiation.

Major award for Coppell teacher, a UT Arlington alum

Monday, October 6, 2014

Mike Yakubovsky, a Coppell High School teacher, was one of six in the world to receive the 2014 National Instruments Excellence in Engineering Education Awards, the Coppell Gazette reported. Yakubovsky is a UT Arlington graduate.

Optimizing data for pain management

Thursday, October 2, 2014

A UT Arlington multi-disciplinary team is optimizing and integrating volumes of data in a National Science Foundation research project to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating patients' pain, PhysOrg reported. Jay Rosenberger, an associate professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, is leading the team, which will work for three years on the $374,998 NSF grant titled: "Statistics-based Optimization Methods for Adaptive Interdisciplinary Pain Management."

Cooling electrons for energy efficiency

Thursday, October 2, 2014

A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington has developed a method to cool electrons to extremely low temperature without external power, a development that may enable electronic devices to work with extremely low power, according to Electronics360. The UT Arlington team – lead by Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor at the Material Science Department – discovered a process to lower the excitation of electrons by passing the particles through a quantum well.

New method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

A UT Arlington research team says recently identified radiation detection properties of a light-emitting nanostructure built in their lab could open doors for homeland security and medical advances, according to NSF Science 360, Engineering.com, R&D Magazine and Science Newsline. In a paper published in Optics Letters, Physics Professor Wei Chen and his co-authors describe a new method to fabricate transparent nanoscintillators by heating nanoparticles composed of lanthanum, yttrium and oxygen until a transparent ceramic is formed. A scintillator refers to a material that glows in response to radiation.

Beaks of birds inspires creation of device to harvest water

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington drew inspiration from an unlikely source — the beaks of the plovers, stilts and other shore birds — when they developed a new type of fog-harvesting device that shows early promise in bringing water to the world’s deserts, according to Civil Engineering, the magazine of the American Society of Civil Engineers. The research was led by Cheng Luo, an engineering professor, and also involves Xin Heng, a doctoral candidate at the school. It was published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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