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In the News 2015

November

EAGER grant

Monday, November 30, 2015

Ankur Jain, UTA assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, is co-leading a team that is seeking ways to harness heat energy lost from automobiles, buildings and other devices, Phys.org, Nanowerk and e Science News reported. Jain is one of the principal investigators on a highly competitive, $225,000 Early-concept Grant for Exploratory Research, or EAGER, award from the National Science Foundation to advance the work.

UTA alum talks fear

Monday, November 30, 2015

When ISIS terrorists attacked Paris on November 13, UTA alumnus Ashfaq Taufique says that he felt two kinds of fear – fear as an American and the unique kind of fear of backlash that Muslims feel in the wake of these events, according to a recent interview in AL.com. Taufique is the president of the Birmingham Islamic Society, which serves the 5,000-plus Muslims living in the area. He earned his bachelor’s in mechanical engineering at UTA.

Engineering in the News

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

New UTA research funded by the National Science Foundation will automatically check for bugs in cyber-physical systems, Phys.org and Electronic Component News reported. Taylor T. Johnson, an assistant professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department, and co-principal investigator Christoph Csallner, an associate professor in that department, will investigate how to automate improvement of development environments for cyber-physical systems with a $498,437 grant.

Engineering in the News

Monday, November 23, 2015

UTA researchers are conducting a three-year, $1 million seismic safety project to analyze data from the Eagle Mountain Lake dam, Informed Infrastructure reported. Anand Puppala, UTA professor of civil engineering and leader of the project, said “Dams in this region were not designed to withstand seismic events, so we want to be able to test them to determine if they are in danger of failing.”

Concrete expert

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Ali Abolmaali, professor and chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at UTA, was quoted in a concrete pipe research story at Informed Infrastructure.com. A new ASTM International standard will support the sustainability and resiliency of concrete pipes that are reinforced by synthetic fibers. “Although these pipes are buried underground – where they’re not seen and seldom thought of – they help provide a safe and healthy environment for the public,” said Abolmaali, an ASTM member.

ClaimBuster explored

Thursday, November 19, 2015

New Scientist reported that at The University of Texas at Arlington, computer scientist Chengkai Li is building a system to fact-check the statements of politicians in real time. The ClaimBuster, as he’s calling it, will study work done by human fact-checkers and, with the help of machine learning, start automating some of that process. Li envisions a final platform that can scan through the transcript of a speech or presidential debate, picking out the lines that we already know to be true or false so journalists can work on checking more complicated claims.

Avoiding errors

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Communications of the ACM noted that Taylor Johnson, a UTA assistant professor of computer science and engineering, recently received a $397,907 U.S. Air Force grant to develop formal methods for automatically identifying so-called cyber-physical system mismatches.

Concrete pipe industry

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

The Concrete Producer noted that the first-of-its-kind trade show exclusively for the concrete pipe industry will be held at UTA in January. The event, sponsored by the American Concrete Pipe Association, is expected to attract more than 400 engineers, executives, owners and other professionals representing the concrete pipe industry in North America.

Driverless car project

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

The Fort Worth Business reported that Manfred Huber, associate professor of computer science and engineering at UTA, is working with Maryland-based engineering firm Robotic Research on a $100,000 driverless car project. Their goal is to design a driverless car that can pick up wounded veterans on a military base and take them to the base’s medical facilities for doctors’ appointments.  

New CASA radar

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

A Sustainable City Network.com report about newly installed CASA radar in northwest Fort Worth noted that one of the radars is located at UTA. In all, six have been installed across the region. The radars work as a network to give forecasters more than one view of a storm.

UTA alum named CIO

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Penn Energy.com and other outlets reported that UTA alumnus Nic Burtea has been named chief information officer of Enertia Software. Burtea has been with the company for 15 years. He earned a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering degree from UTA.

New concrete standard

Monday, November 16, 2015

Ali Abolmaali, professor and chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at UTA, was quoted in a concrete pipe research story at ASTM Newsroom.org. A new ASTM International standard will support the sustainability and resiliency of concrete pipes that are reinforced by synthetic fibers. “Although these pipes are buried underground – where they’re not seen and seldom thought of – they help provide a safe and healthy environment for the public,” said Abolmaali, an ASTM member.

High-tech apartment

Monday, November 16, 2015

In its article about technologies that are making houses smarter and helping to improve the quality of life for patients and caregivers, PharmaVoice.com noted that researchers at UTA are exploring a high-tech apartment where health-tracking technology is built into the appliances, furniture, and even the floor.

Free onine engineering course

Friday, November 13, 2015

Civil Engineering online quoted Pranesh B. Aswath, a professor of materials science and engineering and the associate dean of graduate affairs in the College of Engineering, in its story about The University of Texas System initiative that offers free online college courses to high school students. Some 28,000 students took the introduction to engineering course via the System’s campuses in Arlington, Austin and Permian Basin this fall. Aswath said the opportunities afforded by MOOCs might overcome some of the particular challenges that engineering students face in their early years.

Future of robots

Friday, November 13, 2015

Scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute are researching the future of robots and how they can make life easier for all of us, KOAM/CBS 7 (Joplin, MO) reported. Researchers Mike McNair and Cody Lundberg of UTARI have been programming and studying the use of the PR2 robot, which was manufactured in California. The story initially aired on KTVT/CBS 11 (Dallas).

Future of Robots

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute are researching the future of robots and how they can make life easier for all of us, KTVT/CBS 11 reported. Researchers Mike McNair and Cody Lundberg of UTARI have been programming and studying the use of the PR2 robot, which was manufactured in California. The story also appears online at CBSDFW.com.

Robotic convoys

Thursday, November 12, 2015

The U.S. Department of Transportation has done some work with robotic convoys, Mike McNair, autonomous and intelligent systems director at The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute, or UTARI, said in an article in Unmanned Systems. He added that interest in driverless convoys is international as Japan, Germany, Sweden and others all have significant ongoing work with driverless truck convoy research.

REHEAL glove

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Houston Public Radio station, KUHF 88.7 FM, reported on the REHEAL glove, a specialized glove developed at the UTA Research Institute that can deliver medicine to an injured hand to help speed up healing time and make the process less painful. Principal research scientist Muthu Wijesundara is interviewed in the story that initially aired on Dallas NPR affiliate KERA/90.1 FM.

REHEAL glove

Monday, November 9, 2015

Dallas NPR affiliate, KERA/90.1 FM, reported today that scientists at the UTA Research Institute are developing the REHEAL glove, a specialized glove that can deliver medicine to an injured hand to help speed up healing time and make the process less painful. “What we’re trying to do is distribute delivery and extraction fluid throughout the glove. That way it is easy to address each and every area of the hand,” principal research scientist Muthu Wijesundara said.

SMART bandage

Monday, November 9, 2015

UTA is collaborating with an interdisciplinary and medical team of renowned researchers in creating the Sensing, Monitoring And Release of Therapeutics, or SMART, bandage system that can monitor and cure wounds in real time, Texas Medical Research Collaborative.org reported. Weidong Zhou, professor of electrical engineering, is the principal investigator on a $100,000 grant from the Texas Medical Research Collaborative, which will fund the research.

CASA radar network expands

Monday, November 9, 2015

A Fort Worth Star-Telegram report about a newly installed CASA radar in northwest Fort Worth noted that one of the radars is installed at UTA. In all, six have been installed across the region. The radars work as a network to give forecasters more than one view of a storm.

Therapeutic tool

Friday, November 6, 2015

ASEE First BellMedical Design Technology and Healio reported that UTA researchers and colleagues from other institutions are developing a sensing and therapeutic tool known as the SMART bandage, that will help healthcare workers better monitor and heal patients’ wounds.

Fact checking

Friday, November 6, 2015

ClaimBuster, a tool that helps journalists fact-check statements made by politicians in real time, is among 20 projects to receive support from the Knight Foundation Prototype fund, Catch News reported. Chengkai Li, UTA College of Engineering associate professor, is the project lead.

SMART bandage

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Weidong Zhou, UTA professor of electrical engineering, is principal investigator on a $100,000 grant from the Texas Medical Research Collaborative funding development of a sensing and therapeutic tool, known as the SMART bandage, News-medical.net reported. The SMART bandage will help healthcare workers better monitor and heal patients’ wounds.

REHEAL glove

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Scientists at the UTA Research Institute are developing the REHEAL glove, a specialized glove that can deliver medicine to an injured hand to help speed up healing time and make the process less painful, KERA/90.1 FM reported. “What we’re trying to do is distribute delivery and extraction fluid throughout the glove. That way it is easy to address each and every area of the hand,” principal research scientist Muthu Wijesundara said.

ClaimBuster

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Poynter.org and NeimanLab reported that UTA College of Engineering associate professor Chengkai Li’s ClaimBuster project was among 20 winners to receive support from the Knight Prototype Fund, which supports early-stage media and information projects. ClaimBuster helps journalists fact-check statements by politicians in real time.

UTA tops in auto education

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Mount Shasta, The Bulletin, The Walton Sun, The Star and various other media outlets reported that UTA was named a 10 top college for careers in the auto industry. The article originally appeared on BestRide.com.

Special award for alumnus

Monday, November 2, 2015

ProfitQuotes.com and FreshNews.com reported that AHS International has announced the selection of Mr. Tom L. Wood, Chief Technologist at Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., for the prestigious 2016 Alexander A. Nikolsky Honorary Lectureship, awarded to "an individual who has a highly distinguished career in vertical flight aircraft research and development.” He earned both his bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering and master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from UTA.

October

Civil engineering expert

Friday, October 30, 2015

Ali Abolmaali, Dr. Tseng Huang Endowed Professor and UTA Civil Engineering department chair, was quoted in an ASTM International piece on a new standard supporting the sustainability and resiliency of concrete pipes that are reinforced by synthetic fibers. “Although these pipes are buried underground – where they’re not seen and seldom thought of – they help provide a safe and healthy environment for the public,” said Abolmaali.

Smart healthcare

Thursday, October 29, 2015

The UTA Smart Care Apartment was mentioned in a Real Clear Markets article about the tech revolution currently happening in healthcare. The high-tech apartment features "health-tracking technology built into the appliances, furniture and even the floor."

Automotive engineering and education at its best

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

BestRide.com mentioned UTA in an article about 10 top colleges for careers in the auto industry. Between the Arnold E. Petsche Center for Automotive Engineering and the student designed Formula SAE car, UTA provides great opportunities for those pursing an automotive engineering career, the piece said.

Center for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education lauded

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

UTA's Center for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education was lauded in a Municipal, Sewer & Water Magazine column about the value of teaching trenchless technology. Mo Najafi, a UTA civil engineering professor, runs the Center, which is a university/government/industry cooperative research center. One of the center's aims is to develop new and cost-effective solutions to construct and renew aging underground infrastructure.

Computational fact-checking

Monday, October 26, 2015

"A call to arms to the computing and journalism communities" can be found in a paper on computational fact-checking presented two weeks ago at the Computation+Journalism symposium, a Poynter.org blog reported. Naeemul Hassan of The University of Texas at Arlington and Bill Adair of Duke University presented ‘Claimbuster.’ The paper calls for greater collaboration between computer scientists and journalists on the challenge of computational fact-checking. The basic premise behind all these efforts is that human fact-checkers are unable to sift through zettabytes of content unaided by technology. What makes Claimbuster different from other tools is that it appears essentially ready for fruitful deployment in a traditional fact-checking organization.

Computing norms and trends

Monday, October 26, 2015

Representatives from Ayoka Systems, an Arlington-based software firm, spoke to UTA computer science students about industry norms and trends, Virtual Strategy Magazine reported. Company representatives visited UTA's Association for Computing Machinery members. ACM is the largest education and scientific computing society.

Innovation to creation

Friday, October 23, 2015

Innovation Day at The University of Texas at Arlington showcased a range of technologies designed by faculty and students, WFAA ABC 8, CW 33 KDAF and Fort Worth Business reported. The event also featured speakers talking about how to move innovation to the marketplace. High school and college student teams also competed in a contest showcasing their homemade inventions.

Fact-checking claims by the candidates

Thursday, October 22, 2015

Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington and Duke University presented a study that analyzed the veracity of statements made in a recent presidential debate, Poynter.org reported. In presenting Claimbuster, the paper calls for greater collaboration between computer scientists and journalists on the challenge of computational fact-checking. Claimbuster is the fact-checking program the researchers created.

Healing glove

Thursday, October 22, 2015

University of Texas at Arlington and University of Washington researchers are developing a healing glove that delivers needed medicine to an injured hand and speeds up healing so that rehabilitation can start sooner, Medical Design Briefs reported. The flexible polymeric glove, dubbed the REHEAL Glove, is for treatment after hand trauma. The UT Arlington Research Institute will develop the glove and associated controls while the University of Washington will conduct a small pilot study.

Reheal glove

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

University of Texas at Arlington and University of Washington researchers are developing a healing glove that delivers needed medicine to an injured hand and speeds up healing so that rehabilitation can start sooner, Today’s Medical Developments and Congoo News reported. The flexible polymeric glove, dubbed the REHEAL Glove, is for treatment after hand trauma. The UTA Research Institute will develop the glove and associated controls while the University of Washington will conduct a small pilot study.

Nursing help

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

The University of Texas at Arlington is partnering with RE2 Robotics to develop an adaptive robotic nursing assistant that will help nurses with some of their tasks in a hospital, Inside Unmanned Systems reported. The goal of the project is to provide nurses with help in lifting patients, keeping those patients in bed and walking those patients.

Healing, rehab gloves

Monday, October 19, 2015

The UTA Research Institute has developed two prototype gloves to heal hands faster, KRIV Fox 26 in Houston, KIDY Fox 19 in San Angelo, KSTU Fox 13 in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Fox 9 in Boise, Idaho, reported. The Rehab Glove improves hand function after stroke or surgery and the ReHeal Glove delivers topical therapies to severely burned hands. The story originally aired on KTVT/CBS 11.

Free online courses

Friday, October 16, 2015

Pranesh Aswath, professor and an associate dean in the UTA College of Engineering, was mentioned in a Houston Chronicle article about the UT System’s decision to debut free online classes, becoming he largest public university system to do so. Aswath, who won a grant to teach an intro course to almost 30,000 students, said he hoped the free online course could help reduce the number of engineering students who switch majors.

Helping gloves

Friday, October 16, 2015

The UTA Research Institute has developed two prototype gloves to heal hands faster, WBRC/FOX (Birmingham, Ala.), KFOX (El Paso) and KTBC/FOX (Austin) reported. The Rehab Glove improves hand function after stroke or surgery and the ReHeal Glove delivers topical therapies to severely burned hands. The story originally aired on KTVT/CBS 11.

UTA professor addresses IEEE conference

Friday, October 16, 2015

Gautam Das, UTA professor of Computer Science and Engineering, recently spoke at the IEEE Power, Communication and Information Technology conference in India, The New Indian Express and The Pioneer reported.

Aswath honored

Friday, October 16, 2015

TheFabricator.com reported the 2015 ASM International Class of Fellows was honored at an awards dinner recognizing members' distinguished contributions to materials science, engineering, or manufacturing. Pranesh Aswath, professor and an associate dean in the UTA College of Engineering, was among the honorees.

Healing help for the Hand

Thursday, October 15, 2015

KTVT/CBS 11 reported on two new technologies from the UT Arlington Research Institute that aim to improve hand function. The ReHeal Glove delivers topical therapies to severely burned hands and the Rehab Glove improves hand function after stroke or surgery.

Harnessing Big Data

Thursday, October 15, 2015

UTA computer science and engineering professor Heng Huang’s work on a $2 million National Institutes of Health grant could change the way scientists think about Alzheimer’s disease, a Fort Worth Star-Telegram editorial said.

Smart Care

Thursday, October 15, 2015

The UTA Smart Care apartment was mentioned in a HITConsultant.net article about the home becoming the healthcare center of the future. The Smart Care apartment uses smart technology to enhance independent living by the elderly and disabled.

Improving health care

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

The University of Texas at Arlington and University of Washington researchers are developing a glove that delivers needed medicine to an injured hand and speeds up healing so that rehabilitation can start sooner, News Locker.com reported.

InnovationDay@UTA

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

As a way of celebrating innovative and entrepreneurial excellence, UTA will host its annual InnovationDay@UTA event Oct. 22 at College Park Center, MyArlingtonTX reported.

Evaluating natural resources

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

The Tarrant Regional Water District is spending $1 million during the next three years for a team from The University of Texas at Arlington to study if recent earthquakes in the area have had any impact on safety at Eagle Mountain Dam in Tarrant County, HydroWorld.com reported.

Early prediction of Alzheimer’s disease

Monday, October 12, 2015

BioNews Texas reported that Heng Huang, a professor in the UTA Department of Computer Science and Engineering, has won a $2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the possibility of predicting whether a person is predisposed to develop Alzheimer’s disease by analyzing complex genomics data.

Improving health care

Monday, October 12, 2015

UT Arlington and University of Washington researchers are developing a glove that delivers needed medicine to an injured hand and speeds up healing so that rehabilitation can start sooner, Inverse.com and Rehacare.com reported.

Cell phone browsing

Friday, October 9, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher is partnering with colleagues at Qatar University and George Washington University to make browsing on a cell phone easier, ECN mag.com reported. Browsing the Internet on a cell phone can be a daunting task if the sites visited are not mobile-friendly. UT Arlington researcher Gautam Das and his collaborators will automatically and seamlessly create a mobile-friendly website where one does not exist.

Improving health care

Friday, October 9, 2015

UT Arlington and University of Washington researchers are developing a glove that delivers needed medicine to an injured hand and speeds up healing so that rehabilitation can start sooner, Phys.org, e! Science News and Medical Design Technology online reported.

Smart technology

Friday, October 9, 2015

A story in the HIT Consultant that examined the future of the “Connected Home for Health” noted research by The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Southern California Center for Body Computing. UTA recently announced a “Smart Care” apartment that uses smart technology to reduce the risks of independent aging in place. They are building sensors directly into the floors, walls, and mirrors. USC has announced a Virtual Care Clinic in which virtual care physicians make hologram house calls.

Evaluating natural resources

Friday, October 9, 2015

The Tarrant Regional Water District is spending $1 million to have a team from The University of Texas at Arlington study if recent earthquakes have had any impact on the dam at Eagle Mountain Lake and the ground around it, KHOU.com (Houston) reported. Anand Puppala, professor of civil engineering and associate dean for research in UTA’s College of Engineering, will be leading a team of graduate students. He says the group will look at three factors: liquefaction, dynamic slope stability, and lateral spreading. Each can impact a dam's stability over time.

Robot research

Friday, October 9, 2015

UTA researchers were noted in a story about the upcoming SPIE Defense and Commercial Sensing meeting, reported by Photonics Online and other media. Topics at the robotics portion of the conference will include direct contact and pressure sensors, with applications such as in robot “skin,” said Dan Popa, UTA associate professor of electrical engineering. Popa and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at the UT Arlington Research Institute, will co-chair the event.

The future of education

Friday, October 9, 2015

Inside Higher Ed quoted George Siemens, executive director of the UT Arlington LINK Lab, in its story about MIT’s plan to offer half of its master’s of engineering in logistics degree through face-to-face classes and half through massive open online courses, potentially saving students tens of thousands of dollars in tuition. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has used a similar model for its iMBA program. Siemens said the new models suggest the institutions are showing a willingness to remake themselves.

Evaluating natural resources

Thursday, October 8, 2015

WFAA/ABC 8 interviewed Anand Puppala, a professor of civil engineering and associate dean for research in UTA’s College of Engineering, about a project he is leading from the Tarrant Regional Water District to analyze data taken at the Eagle Mountain Lake dam. Puppala will use the data to create a framework that future investigators can use to determine if a dam has sustained damage from earthquakes. A web version of the story also appears at WFAA.com.  WBAP/820 AM also reported on the research.

Focus on robotics

Thursday, October 8, 2015

UTA researchers were noted in a story about the upcoming SPIE Defense and Commercial Sensing meeting, reported by BioSpace, ITBusinessnet.com and other media. Topics at the robotics portion of the conference will include direct contact and pressure sensors, with applications such as in robot “skin,” said Dan Popa, UTA associate professor of electrical engineering. Popa and Muthu Wijesundara, principal research scientist at the UT Arlington Research Institute, will co-chair the event.

Evaluating natural resources

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

A UT Arlington researcher is developing a comprehensive, reliability-based framework to analyze North Texas dams and detect damage from seismic activity, Civil + Structural Engineer reported. Anand Puppala, a professor of civil engineering and associate dean for research in UT Arlington’s College of Engineering, is overseeing a three-year, $1 million project from the Tarrant Regional Water District to analyze data taken at the Eagle Mountain Lake dam, which he will then use to create a framework that future investigators can use to determine if a dam has sustained damage from earthquakes.

Improving health care

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a grant for nearly $1 million that will enable him to build a robotic nursing assistant designed to assist nurses and other healthcare providers with routine duties, Vision-Systems.com reported. Dan Popa, an associate professor in the Electrical Engineering Department, received the National Science Foundation grant for the three-year project that partners with the UT Arlington College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Texas Health Resources and the UT Arlington Research Institute. AUVSI News reported a similar story.

Evaluating natural resources

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

A UT Arlington researcher is developing a comprehensive, reliability-based framework to analyze North Texas dams and detect damage from seismic activity, Informed Infrastructure reported. Anand Puppala, a professor of civil engineering and associate dean for research in UT Arlington’s College of Engineering, is overseeing a three-year, $1 million project from the Tarrant Regional Water District to analyze data taken at the Eagle Mountain Lake dam, which he will then use to create a framework that future investigators can use to determine if a dam has sustained damage from earthquakes.

Harnessing big data

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Healio reported that Heng Huang, a professor in the UTA Department of Computer Science and Engineering, has won a $2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the possibility of predicting whether a person is predisposed to develop Alzheimer’s disease by analyzing complex genomics data.

Improving health care

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

RE2 Inc., a leading developer of robotic manipulator arms, is collaborating with UT Arlington to build a robotic nurse assistant for the National Science Foundation, Yahoo! Finance (UK & Ireland), BioSpace, FreshNews.com, Digital Journal, Sys-Con Media, Pittsburgh Business Times and other media outlets reported.  

Evaluating natural resources

Monday, October 5, 2015

A UT Arlington researcher is developing a comprehensive, reliability-based framework to analyze North Texas dams and detect damage from seismic activity, Phys.org reported. Anand Puppala, a professor of civil engineering and associate dean for research in UT Arlington’s College of Engineering, is overseeing a three-year, $1 million project from the Tarrant Regional Water District to analyze data taken at the Eagle Mountain Lake dam, which he will then use to create a framework that future investigators can use to determine if a dam has sustained damage from earthquakes.

Yahoo donates computer servers

Monday, October 5, 2015

Black Enterprise magazine noted that Yahoo! Labs previously donated 480 computer servers to UT Arlington in a story about Yahoo’s recent donation of 40 servers to UT El Paso. The donation is part of the tech company's program to develop and educate diverse student populations in computer science and technology careers.

Possible Alzheimer's help

Friday, October 2, 2015

Alzheimer’s News Today reported that Heng Huang, a professor in the UTA Department of Computer Science and Engineering, has won a $2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the possibility of predicting whether a person is predisposed to develop Alzheimer’s disease by analyzing complex genomics data.

Yahoo donates computer servers

Thursday, October 1, 2015

KVIA/ABC 7 (El Paso) noted that Yahoo! Labs previously donated 480 computer servers to the UT Arlington in a story about Yahoo’s recent donation of 40 servers to UT El Paso. The donation is part of the tech company's program to develop and educate diverse student populations in computer science and technology careers.

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