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In the News 2015

April

Structural component design optimization

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Robert Taylor, professor in practice in UT Arlington’s Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, will make a presentation on structural component design optimization at the 2015 Americas Altair Technology Conference in Dearborn, Mich., May 5-7 KUSI in San Diego, WAFF 48 in Huntsville, Ala., WRCB 3 in Chatranooga, Tenn. and many other websites reported. He will demonstrate how additive manufacturing removes many of the constraints on product design, including weight.

Cartilage regeneration

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Liping Tang, a bioengineering professor and interim chair of the bioengineering department at The University of Texas at Arlington, is making progress on research that uses hyaluronic acid to rescue cells, Orthopedic This Week reported. Tang was awarded a $1.04 million grant from the U.S. Army. “We are using biomolecules to recruit patients’ stem cells to the injured cartilage to promote its healing process. At this time we are making hyaluronic acid particles to deliver biomolecules that will trigger a stem cell response.” Hyaluronic acid is a biological hydrogel.

Great Minds in STEM

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Great Minds in STEM announced a partnership with the STEM Community Council of Arlington in a citywide celebration of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math this week, WLNE ABC 6 in Providence, R.I., WOWK 13 in Charleston, W. Va., WLTZ in Columbus, Ga., ABC 33/40 in Birmingham, Ala., and many other websites reported. Local STEM college students from UT Arlington and other colleges will serve as college mentors, guiding student teams through various challenges posed to them throughout an engineering and science design process.

Great minds celebrate STEM fields

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Great Minds in STEM announced a partnership with the STEM Community Council of Arlington in a citywide celebration of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math this week, WAVE 3 in Louisville, Ky., WFMJ 21 in Youngstown, Ohio, KSLA 12 in Shreveport, La., Boston.com and many other websites reported. Local STEM college students from UT Arlington and other colleges will serve as college mentors, guiding student teams through various challenges posed to them throughout an engineering and science design process later this week.

StartUp Lounge

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

UT Arlington announced the opening of The StartUp Lounge, a new innovation center located on campus, BioNews Texas reported. The center aims to be a collaborative space that will bolster the development and entrepreneurial efforts of institutions within North Texas. The StartUp Lounge is a collaboration among Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies, the UT Arlington College of Business, College of Engineering and College of Science, ant Tech FW.

Discovering new materials

Monday, April 27, 2015

A UT Arlington electrical engineer is discovering new materials and processes to provide better imaging, faster computing and more communications security, Phys.org, Congoo News and SG Online News reported. Weidong Zhou, the UTA electrical engineer who specializes in nanophotonics, has been awarded a $120,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop manmade nanostructured photonic materials to accomplish those stated goals and eventually help in the nano-manufacturing process.

Analytical chemistry award

Friday, April 24, 2015

The India Journal reported that Purnendu Dasgupta, Jenkins Garrett Professor of Chemistry at UT Arlington, has been awarded the 2015 American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry J. Calvin Giddings Award. Among other accomplishments, the national award recognizes a scientist who has enhanced the professional development of analytical chemistry students. 

StartUp Lounge

Friday, April 24, 2015

EIN News reported on the StartUp Lounge, a new innovation center located within The University of Texas at Arlington. The center aims to be a collaborative space that will bolster the development and entrepreneurial efforts of institutions within the North Texas region.

Concrete canoe competition

Friday, April 24, 2015

The Examiner.com noted several schools, including UT Arlington, have students competing this weekend in the American Society of Civil Engineers Texas-Mexico Regional Concrete Canoe Competition at Lamar University. Winning teams will advance to the 28th annual Concrete Canoe National Competition hosted in June by Clemson University.

Generating power efficiencies

Thursday, April 23, 2015

A UT Arlington-inspired business has created a new power generator that could bring electricity to so many areas of the world who live beyond the grid, Ship & Bunker reported. The Afthon process harnesses pressure gain combustion, also known as detonation, which the team has termed “Fire 2.0.” Afthon's patented technology will be able to replace conventional engines in cars, boats, ships, trains, airplanes, rockets and power plants, researchers said.

Laser detection

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Weidong Zhou, a University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineering professor, has won a $600,000 grant to build a small laser for detection systems that will more efficiently spot chemical and biological agents used for weapons, AZO Nano, BioSpace, Congoo News, Semiconductor Today and CompoundSemi.com reported. The grant is part of an overall, three-year $4.3 million Defense Advance Research Projects Agency grant to make ultraviolet laser detection more available in the field.

Lasers to the rescue

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineering researcher has won a federal grant to build a small laser for detection systems to do a more efficient job at spotting chemical and biological agents used for weapons, Phys.org, I-Connect007Nanowerk.com and several other news sites reported. Weidong Zhou, an electrical engineering professor who specializes in nanophotonics, has been awarded $600,000, which is part of an overall, three-year, $4.3 million Defense Advance Research Projects Agency grant to make ultraviolet laser detection more available in the field.

NASA project

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Dallas NPR affiliate, KERA 90.1 FM, interviewed Brian Dennis, UT Arlington associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, about oxygen recovery and reuse in space. Dennis and his team are in a competition hosted by NASA to create a better way to recycle oxygen for astronauts. NASA also awarded the team more than $500,000 for the research. “Ultimately, what we want to do is take the CO2… pull that oxygen out of the carbon dioxide so that people can breathe it again.” If UTA wins, a piece of the team’s technology would be included in future space travel.

More sustainable generator

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

A UT Arlington-inspired business has created a new power generator that could bring electricity to so many areas of the world who live beyond the grid, Bunkerworld News reported. The Afthon process harnesses pressure gain combustion, also known as detonation, which the team has termed “Fire 2.0.” Afthon's patented technology will be able to replace conventional engines in cars, boats, ships, trains, airplanes, rockets and power plants, researchers said.

The StartUp Lounge

Monday, April 20, 2015

A new entrepreneurial space – The StartUp Lounge – has opened at the University of Texas at Arlington, the Fort Worth Business Press Tech Notes and Dallas Business Journal Tech Flash blog reported. The StartUp Lounge expects to augment institutions that exist within the North Texas Region by facilitating initial steps within the entrepreneurial process. The initiative is a collaborative, with representation from Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies, the UT Arlington schools and colleges of business, science and engineering, and TECH Fort Worth through TECHFW@UTA.

Help for hearing-impaired people

Monday, April 20, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineering researcher is developing a more efficient, low–power integrated circuit for directional hearing aids that will lead to a better quality of life for hearing-impaired people, MDLinx.com reported. Sungyong Jung, an associate professor of electrical engineering, received a two–year, $144,000 grant from the Korean Electrotechnology Research Institute to build an integrated circuit for a tiny microphone that would mimic the auditory system of a Ornia ochracea – a parasitic fly known for its exceptionally miniscule ear.

Award-worthy tech companies

Monday, April 20, 2015

Three emerging technology companies will be spotlighted at this year’s TECH Fort Worth IMPACT Awards on Wednesday, May 13, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. The IMPACT Awards recognize and celebrate the global impact of emerging technologies in North Texas. Sponsors of TECH Fort Worth include UT Arlington and other institutions.

Shipping underground

Friday, April 17, 2015

The University of Texas at Arlington has received a $1.2 million competitive research grant from the Texas Department of Transportation to investigate building underground freight transportation in certain urban environments with heavy truck traffic, Phys.org reported. Mo Najafi, a UT Arlington civil engineering professor, will lead the project. Sia Ardekani, civil engineering professor, and Mohsen Shahandashti, civil engineering senior lecturer, are co-principal investigators on the project.

New power source

Friday, April 17, 2015

A team of UT Arlington researchers has created a new power generator that can produce electricity up to 25 percent more efficiently than existing technology, reduce emissions and could alleviate power shortages in more remote areas of the globe, Phys.org and ECN Magazine.com reported. Raheem Bello, an aerospace engineering doctoral candidate in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, is chief executive officer and cofounder of Afthon, which has won accolades for its innovation, including $25,000 grant funding from VentureWell.

StartUp Lounge

Friday, April 17, 2015

An entrepreneurial collision space – The StartUp Lounge – has opened at The University of Texas at Arlington, CityBizList Dallas reported. The StartUp Lounge expects to augment institutions that exist within the North Texas region by facilitating initial steps within the entrepreneurial process. The initiative is highly collaborative, with representation from Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies, the UT Arlington Colleges of Business, Science and Engineering, and TECH Fort Worth through TECHFW@UTA.  

Office of the future model

Friday, April 17, 2015

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported on a movement that is looking at college campuses like UT Arlington as models for the office of the future. Rebecca Boles, assistant dean of the School of Architecture, led a tour Wednesday of furniture makers who wanted to see firsthand where individuals have spent the last four to six years of their lives. Campus stops included Nedderman Hall, the Central Library and the LINK Research Lab. Many large corporations are making moves, in varying degrees, toward improving their workspaces for the millennials, said George Siemens, executive director of the LINK Lab. “They’re going to choose the environment that is better suited for collaboration and innovation, a human workplace,” he said. The article also appeared at Bloomberg.com.

High-speed rail plan

Friday, April 17, 2015

Despite mounting opposition, the company backing high-speed rail between Dallas and Houston insists that the $12 billion plan will reach fruition, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. The road to rail began with a feasibility study finding that constructing track between “pair cities” such as Dallas and Houston would require less funding than laying track within more congested urban areas such as the stretch between Fort Worth and Dallas. Conducting the 2011-2013 study was Steve Mattingly, a University of Texas at Arlington civil engineer.

UTA part of NASA project

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Controlled Environments magazine reported The University of Texas at Arlington is one of four U.S. institutions selected by NASA to develop improved methods for oxygen recovery and reuse aboard human spacecraft, a technology the agency says is crucial to enable the human journey to Mars and beyond.

UT alum appointed president, CEO

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Nephros, Inc., a commercial stage medical device company, has appointed UT Arlington alumnus Daron Evans as president and chief executive officer of its Board of Directors, CNN Money, Bloomberg, IStockAnalyst and other business news organizations reported. Evans received his master's degree in biomedical engineering from a joint program at UT Arlington and UT Southwestern Medical School.

Improving healthcare

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Science & Enterprise noted Fillia Makedon, Jenkins-Garrett Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at UT Arlington, in an item about the iPerform Center for Assistive Technologies to Enhance Human Performance, which she directs. The National Science Foundation will fund the center formed by UT Arlington and UT Dallas for five years. Researchers will study software solutions for assistive technologies that benefit disabled and able-bodied people alike. 

AIMBE fellow hired as new biomedical engineering chair

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The University of Texas at Arlington has hired Michael Cho, a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biomedical Engineering and professor at University of Illinois-Chicago, to be the new chair of the UT Arlington Bioengineering Department, the Dallas Business Journal’s People on the Move section reported.

NASA chooses UT Arlington to study oxygen recovery technology for space travel

Monday, April 13, 2015

News360, Nanowerk.com, Next Big Future.com, AZO Nano.com and Art of Service.com reported that NASA has selected UT Arlington as one of four U.S. institutions to develop improved methods for oxygen recovery and reuse aboard human spacecraft, a technology the agency says is crucial to “enable our human journey to Mars and beyond.” NASA’s Game Changing Development Program awarded $513,356 recently to the UT Arlington team.   

UTA research could lead to more efficient energy use

Monday, April 13, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington engineering researcher will build nanoscale pillars that will lead to more energy-efficient transistors in electronic devices and gadgets, ECN Magazine.com reported. Seong Jin Koh, an associate professor in the Materials Science & Engineering Department, has received a $300,000 National Science Foundation grant that could lead to a tenfold reduction in energy consumption of smart phones, laptops and tablets, which could result in an identical reduction in the frequency of battery charging for those devices. Koh's work also was highlighted in today's ASEE First Bell e-newsletter.

Going vertical

Friday, April 10, 2015

Seong Jin Koh, a UT Arlington engineering researcher, will build nanoscale pillars that will lead to more energy-efficient transistors in electronic devices and gadgets, NanoTech, Phys.org, Congoo, eScience News and many other websites reported.

Hearing help

Thursday, April 9, 2015

UT Arlington electrical engineering researcher Sungyong Jung is developing more efficient, low-power integrated circuits for directional hearing aids that will lead to a better quality of life for hearing-impaired people, In Compliance Magazine reported. Jung received a grant from the Korean Electrotechnology Research Institute that would create an integrated circuit for a tiny microphone that would mimic the auditory system of a parasitic fly known for its exceptionally miniscule ear.

Trenchless methods

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Another area of growth for the trenchless relining market is for rehabilitating culverts that were constructed to divert storm water under newly built roadways, Utility Contractor Online reported. Mohammad Najafi, a UT Arlington civil engineering professor, said like municipal water and sewer systems, these culverts were built in the post-war years as America began to expand rapidly and are in need of repair. Najafi, who also is director of the UT Arlington Center for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education, said culverts represent an area in which trenchless methods are still in the early stages.

Green card system

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Shyam Sriram said getting a green card in the United States takes an inordinate amount of time and Congress should fix the system, Gazette.net, a Maryland community newspaper website, reported. Sriram, 35, came to the United States from India to attend graduate school at UT Arlington. He has a master’s degree in electrical engineering and works in the transportation business. He has an H-1B visa which allows him to work. Sriram is vice president of the Maryland Chapter of Immigration Voice, a grass roots organization concerned about the backlog of green card applications.

Hearing help

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

UT Arlington electrical engineering researcher Sungyong Jung is developing more efficient, low-power integrated circuits for directional hearing aids that will lead to a better quality of life for hearing-impaired people, MDLinx and Hearing Aid News reported. Jung received a grant from the Korean Electrotechnology Research Institute that would create an integrated circuit for a tiny microphone that would mimic the auditory system of a parasitic fly known for its exceptionally miniscule ear.

Hearing help

Thursday, April 2, 2015

UT Arlington electrical engineering researcher Sungyong Jung is developing more efficient, low-power integrated circuits for directional hearing aids that will lead to a better quality of life for hearing-impaired people, ECN reported. Jung received a grant from the Korean Electrotechnology Research Institute that would create an integrated circuit for a tiny microphone that would mimic the auditory system of a parasitic fly known for its exceptionally miniscule ear. The American Society for Engineering Education's First Bell compilation also included a brief about Jung's research,

Hearing help

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Sungyong Jung, a UT Arlington electrical engineering associate professor, is developing a more efficient, low-power integrated circuit for directional hearing aids that will lead to a better quality of life for hearing impaired people, News-Medical.net, Health News, Hearing Aid News, MDT Magazine and many other websites reported. Jung received a grant from the Korean Electrotechnology Research Institute to build an integrated circuit for a tiny microphone that would mimic the auditory system of a parasitic fly known for its exceptionally miniscule ear.

March

Radar system tracks tornadoes

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

A Red Orbit story about the CASA radar’s ability to track tornadoes up to the minute mentioned UT Arlington, which partnered with other institutions on the National Science Foundation’s Accelerating Innovative Research program.

STEM help

Monday, March 23, 2015

The Frisco Enterprise mentioned that UT Arlington is one of the institutions partnering with the Frisco Education Foundation to make the 2015 Mindbender Camp possible. The program encourages middle school students to explore the world of science, technology, engineering, art and math, and is Frisco ISD’s most popular event.

Building solutions

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Inc. Magazine included UT Arlington doctoral student Raheem Bello in its look at three young entrepreneurs who built solutions after encountering real problems. A power outage in his hometown in Nigeria led Bello to co-found Afthon, a company that is increasing the efficiency of combustion engines by leveraging a supersonic combustion process. He’s starting by developing solar generators. Bello is pursuing his PhD in aerospace, aeronautical, and astronautical engineering at UTA.

Bad soil

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Anand Puppala, distinguished teaching professor of civil engineering and associate dean for research in the College of Engineering at UT Arlington, provided analysis for a KTVT/CBS 11 investigative piece about a falling retaining wall. A Fort Worth homeowner is fighting to get the wall fixed. “I’ve seen this kinds of failures,” Puppala noted after examining the wall. “But the soil that is in the front of the wall is probably one of the worse ones I’ve seen.” He said soil, the quality of material to build the wall and proper drainage are all major factors in its failure.

Bonds for campus academic buildings

Thursday, March 12, 2015

A group of education budget writers in the House has recommended funding for a raft of new academic buildings on state university and technical college campuses — including seven projects at Dallas-area schools, The Dallas Morning News reported. At UT Arlington, $70 million of $190 million requested for a science and education innovation and research building was recommended. However, a UT Arlington nursing building was not funded.

Alumna on the move

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Burns & McDonnell, a company made up of more than 5,000 engineers architects, construction professionals, scientists, consultants and entrepreneurs, has hired water industry leader Kathy Berek to lead a new division centered on water, EIN and several other websites reported. Berek received her master's degree in civil engineering from UT Arlington.

Winter weather closing

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Wintry weather closed UT Arlington, and many schools and businesses today, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and many other media outlets reported.

Foundation work

Thursday, March 5, 2015

A UT Arlington researcher's project will show whether California bridge foundations are safe and up to standards that the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials has set, Phys.org and Congoo News reported. Xinbao Yu, an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, has been awarded a two-year, $220,000 California Department of Transportation or Caltrans research project that will analyze and evaluate whether its bridge foundations are in accordance with the federal AASHTO standards.

Boiler sensor research

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Haiying Huang, UT Arlington mechanical and aerospace engineering professor, received a $399,311 Department of Energy grant that will make coal-fired boilers safer and more efficient, The Dallas Morning News reported.

Engineering research

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

One of the keys of UT Arlington researchers' designing and building a working micro-windmill to generate power for electronic devices is in using a nickel alloy to construct it, EE Times reported. 

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