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In the News 2015

July

Engineering impact

Friday, July 31, 2015

Anand Puppala, UT Arlington civil engineering Distinguished Teaching Professor, is working with the Texas Department of Transportation to use giant foam blocks to strengthen roads and bridges in the state, KTVT CBS 11 reported. Puppala, who also is associate dean of research in the College of Engineering, has used the blocks successfully on Texas 67 in Johnson County.

Solar energy storage

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have found a way to improve solar technology, Energy Manager Today reported. They have developed an energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when it’s dark. The UT Arlington technology was mentioned in a story about how University of California Riverside chemists have found a way to boost solar photovoltaic efficiencies.

Mind for engineering

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

KTVT/CBS 11 interviewed Andi Scott, assistant director for Undergraduate Recruitment at UT Arlington, about a Make-A-Wish recipient whose dream is to major in computer engineering at UT Arlington. Tane Johnson suffers from a life-threatening neurological condition. His grade point average dropped after he missed school to receive treatment. He later brought his grades up and gained admission to UT Arlington. “How often do you hear about Make-A-Wish events where someone is saying ‘I want to go this school because I want to be an engineer,’” said Scott. “We obviously want that student at UT Arlington.” Make-A-Wish will cover Johnson’s tuition and expenses for the first year.

Solar energy storage

Monday, July 27, 2015

Researchers have been making progress on scalable storage for solar energy, but one problem that persists is how to store and use energy from the sun even when it’s dark, Design News reported. Now researchers at UT Arlington have found a way to solve this issue with an all-vanadium photo-electrochemical flow cell that can store solar energy on a large scale, even at night. A team in the UT Arlington Materials Science and Engineering Department led by Assistant Professor Fuqiang Liu developed the cell and published a paper on their research in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Catalysis. 

More durable materials

Thursday, July 23, 2015

AZO Materials reported that Ashfaq Adnan, a UT Arlington assistant professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, has received a highly competitive $120,000 Early-concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) from the National Science Foundation. Adnan is developing a new material by mixing ceramics and modifying molecular structures.

Innovation and creativity

Thursday, July 23, 2015

UT Arlington student Mohammed Azmat Qureshi and his partner Oluwatosin Oluwadare have developed the app “EyeCYou,” which helps the visually impaired “see” people in front of them through Connect Ability, a tech challenge aimed at empowering people with disabilities, American Public Media’s Marketplace and KERA 90.1 FM’s Breakthroughs blog reported. Android Central, WBFO 88.7AM (Buffalo, NY), and various other media outlets also ran the story.

More durable material

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington engineer is modifying molecular structures and blending ceramics to create new material that would be less brittle but retain the strength of the original ceramic and could be used on spacecraft, in power plants and for other applications, Phys.org and eScience News reported. Ashfaq Adnan, a UT Arlington assistant professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, was awarded a highly competitive $120,000 Early-concept Grant for Exploratory Research or EAGER award from the National Science Foundation to advance his work.

Engineering expert

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Jean-Pierre Bardet, director of the UT Arlington Urban Water Institute and professor of civil engineering, was interviewed on KCRW 89.9 FM, a National Public Radio station in Santa Monica, Calif., about the recent torrential downpours in Southern California and what people can do concerning infrastructure exposed to such extreme weather.

New composites

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington professor is collaborating with Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. through a $1.35 million grant to design more durable materials and accelerate their implementation in composite aircraft, Vertical.com reported. Andrew Makeev, professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department and director of the UT Arlington Advanced Materials and Structures Lab, received the grant from the Army National Rotorcraft Technology Center to build stronger and more durable composite materials for aircraft.

Additive manufacturing

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, announced that UT Arlington is among the awardees of its Project Call No. 3 for additive manufacturing applied research and development projects, Today's Medical Developments reported. Up to $8 million in funding will be awarded to a total of nine teams. The project, “A Design Guidance System for AM” is led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, in conjunction with UT Arlington, UT Austin, Siemens Corporate Technology, MSC, Senvol, Lockheed Martin, GKN Aerospace, Woodward, Siemens Energy and Siemens PLM. 

Answering the call

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

After a successful career in building bridges and roads, Kyle Walterscheid left his structural engineering work for life as a priest, North Texas Catholic reported. Walterscheid received his master's degree in engineering from UT Arlington. He said he loved his work in civil engineering but felt the call to the priesthood. Now, he's a priest in Denton.

Race car weekend

Monday, July 20, 2015

UT Arlington students hosted the 15th Annual Texas Autocross this weekend, WFAA Channel 8 and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. KRLD 1080, KDFW Fox 4 and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram also previewed the event, which featured student formula race cars from at least a dozen universities across the country.

New composities

Monday, July 20, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington professor is collaborating with Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. through a $1.35 million grant to design more durable materials and accelerate their implementation in composite aircraft, aerospace-technology.com and Helihub reported. Andrew Makeev, professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department and director of the UT Arlington Advanced Materials and Structures Lab, received the grant from the Army National Rotorcraft Technology Center to build stronger and more durable composite materials for aircraft.

Environmental impact

Monday, July 20, 2015

The University of Texas at Arlington has established the Solid Waste Institute for Sustainability to provide leadership and expertise to countries and cities around the globe in how to make waste management and landfills more efficient and sustainable, the International Solid Waste Association newsletter reported. SWIS’ mission is to work on developing clean and healthy urban cities through sustainable waste management. The center is developed in agreement with ISWA. The ISWA president also mentioned SWIS in his message in the newsletter. The newsletter is circulated to more than 80 countries.

Health and human condition

Monday, July 20, 2015

Hydrocephalus Kids reported that scientists from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of North Texas Health Science Center are building a prototype for an implantable in-line shunt flow monitoring system that would deliver both on-demand and continuous readings of hydrocephalus.

Additive manufacturing

Monday, July 20, 2015

America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, announced that UT Arlington is among the awardees of its Project Call No. 3 for additive manufacturing applied research and development projects, Additive Manufacturing.com reported. Up to $8 million in funding will be awarded to a total of nine teams. The project, “A Design Guidance System for AM” is led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, in conjunction with UT Arlington, UT Austin, Siemens Corporate Technology, MSC, Senvol, Lockheed Martin, GKN Aerospace, Woodward, Siemens Energy and Siemens PLM. 

Stronger materials

Friday, July 17, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington professor is collaborating with Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. through a $1.35 million grant to design more durable materials and accelerate their implementation in composite aircraft, AZOM.com and Converter News reported.

Additive manufacturing

Friday, July 17, 2015

America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, announced that UT Arlington is among the awardees of its Project Call #3 for additive manufacturing applied research and development projects, Make Parts Fast.com and 3DPrint.com reported. Up to $8 million in funding will be awarded to a total of nine teams.  The project, “A Design Guidance System for AM” is led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, in conjunction with UT Arlington, UT Austin, Siemens Corporate Technology, MSC, Senvol, Lockheed Martin, GKN Aerospace, Woodward, Siemens Energy, and Siemens PLM. 

Race car weekend

Friday, July 17, 2015

Teams from The University of Texas at Arlington and 13 others schools, including one from Canada, will rev up their built-from-scratch Formula SAE race cars at the 15th annual Texas Autocross Weekend at UT Arlington, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. UT Arlington’s team has previously been ranked No. 5 in the world and No. 1 in the United States. Most of the students are from the College of Engineering, but some have come from other schools and colleges at UT Arlington.

New composites

Thursday, July 16, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington professor is collaborating with Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. through a $1.35 million grant to design more durable materials and accelerate their implementation in composite aircraft, Aerospace-Technology.com reported.

Additive manufacturing

Thursday, July 16, 2015

America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, announced that UT Arlington is among the awardees of its Project Call #3 for additive manufacturing applied research and development projects, Prototype Today reported. Up to $8 million in funding will be awarded to a total of nine teams.  The project, “A Design Guidance System for AM” is led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, in conjunction with UT Arlington, UT Austin, Siemens Corporate Technology, MSC, Senvol, Lockheed Martin, GKN Aerospace, Woodward, Siemens Energy, and Siemens PLM. 

New solar cell

Thursday, July 16, 2015

One of the drawbacks of current solar technology is the inability to store energy under dark conditions, Energy Manager Today reported. A team of researchers at UT Arlington has addressed this limitation by developing an energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when it’s dark.

Stronger materials

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington professor is collaborating with Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. through a $1.35 million grant to design more durable materials and accelerate their implementation in composite aircraft, Phys.org and ECN Mag.com reported. Andrew Makeev, professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department and director of the UT Arlington Advanced Materials and Structures Lab, received the grant from the Army National Rotorcraft Technology Center to build stronger and more durable composite materials for aircraft.

America Makes awards funding

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, announced that UT Arlington is among the awardees of its Project Call #3 for additive manufacturing applied research and development projects, Westmoreland Times reported. Up to $8 million in funding will be awarded to a total of nine teams.  The project, “A Design Guidance System for AM” is led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, in conjunction with UT Arlington, UT Austin, Siemens Corporate Technology, MSC, Senvol, Lockheed Martin, GKN Aerospace, Woodward, Siemens Energy, and Siemens PLM.  

New solar energy cell

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

ASEE First Bell, Science Daily and the Art of Service noted that a University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when it’s dark.

Storing solar energy at night

Monday, July 13, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when it's dark, One News Page and Manufacturing Business Technology reported. The innovation is advancement over the most common solar energy systems that rely on using sunlight immediately as a power source. 

New shunt flow monitoring system

Monday, July 13, 2015

BioNews Texas reported that scientists from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of North Texas Health Science Center are building a prototype for an implantable in-line shunt flow monitoring system that would deliver both on-demand and continuous readings of hydrocephalus.

Solar power at night

Friday, July 10, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when it's dark, Energy Harvesting Journal reported. The innovation is advancement over the most common solar energy systems that rely on using sunlight immediately as a power source. 

New shunt flow monitoring system

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Congoo reported that scientists from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of North Texas Health Science Center are building a prototype for an implantable in-line shunt flow monitoring system that would deliver both on-demand and continuous readings of hydrocephalus.

New solar power cell

Thursday, July 9, 2015

UT System blog, UT Matters, reported that a University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when it’s dark. “This research has a chance to rewrite how we store and use solar power,” said Fuqiang Liu, an assistant professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department who led the research team.

Bringing back manufacturing

Thursday, July 9, 2015

The Business Journals.com, InvestorPoint and other media sites mentioned UT Arlington in a story about grant money awarded by the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the Walmart Foundation for domestic manufacturing research being developed by nonprofit organizations and public universities. The Second Awards Cycle launched yesterday. UT Arlington received a grant during the First Awards Cycle, which focused on textile production, small motor manufacturing, and injection molding.

Health and human condition

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

News-Medical.net and Phys.org reported that scientists from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of North Texas Health Science Center are building a prototype for an implantable in-line shunt flow monitoring system that would deliver both on-demand and continuous readings of hydrocephalus.

Sustainable solutions

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Buildings.com reported that a University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new photoelectrochemical energy cell that can efficiently store solar energy and deliver electrical power 24 hours a day.

Interns energetic about energy

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Oncor news site, The Wire, interviewed UT Arlington student Mila Hunt in an article about the company’s 30 summer interns and why they chose to focus on energy. “Energy is the future,” Hunt said of her decision to pursue a career in that industry. “As a society, we’ve come into this great knowledge of how to harness, convert, control and benefit from energy. It only makes sense to focus all of our efforts on changing the way we interact with it.”    

Storing solar energy

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

NASA Tech Briefs, Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence, BioNews TX and Gizmag reported that a University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new photoelectrochemical energy cell that can efficiently store solar energy and deliver electrical power 24 hours a day.  

Trinity River's potent punch

Monday, July 6, 2015

MSN.com reported that The University of Texas at Arlington is conducting a study on flood risks across parts of Tarrant County. The story initially appeared in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Solar energy storage

Friday, July 3, 2015

The University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed an energy cell that allows for efficient and large-scale solar energy storage even when dark, Phys.org, R&D Magazine, ECNMag.com, Innovation Toronto, WirelessDesignMag.com, ScienceNewsline.com, IConnect007.com, and Product Design and Development reported. The work is a product of the 2013 National Science Foundation $400,000 grant to improve the way solar energy is captured, stored and transmitted for use.

Environmental solution

Friday, July 3, 2015

UT Arlington researchers are part of a team creating a new solution to mitigate the environmental burden of discarded electronics, EE Times reported. The team, led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is developing biodegradable transistors that perform at the same level as traditional transistors.

Solar energy storage

Thursday, July 2, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington materials science and engineering team has developed a new energy cell that can store large-scale solar energy even when dark, Solar Thermal Magazine, World Industrial Reporter and eScience News reported. The innovation is an advancement over the most common solar energy systems that rely on using sunlight immediately as a power source.

Small motor manufacturing

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

A UT Arlington project aimed at developing a manufacturing system that will autonomously prepare small motor sub-systems and assemble motor components was mentioned in a Design News article about Walmart’s efforts to buy-and-sell more U.S. made products. The UT Arlington project is funded by a grant from the Walmart Manufacturing Innovation Fund, which awarded $4 million last year to seven R&D institutions working on advanced manufacturing of textiles and injection molding technology.

June

Engineering research

Friday, June 26, 2015

The City of Arlington website, MyArlingtonTX, reported on a major donation of 480 servers by Yahoo! Labs. The gift will support furthered research into making the essential network equipment more efficient.

Flood risks

Friday, June 26, 2015

A University of Texas at Arlington study on flood risks in Tarrant County was mentioned in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram article about the history of floods alongs the Trinity River.

Special delivery

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Yahoo! Labs delivered hundreds of servers to UT Arlington to further student and academic research into more efficient systems of cooling essential network equipment, KXAS/NBC5 reported.

Senior scientist appointment

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Bloomberg Business and Reuters reported that Jennifer Seifert has been appointed as Senior Scientist to lead the spinal cord injuries repair program for TissueGen. As a postdoctoral fellow at UT Arlington, Seifert established an animal model of distraction spinal cord injury in collaboration with Texas Scottish Rite Hospital.

Composites in infrastructure

Friday, June 19, 2015

A new National Science Foundation center at The University of Texas at Arlington will determine how to best use composite materials to extend the life-cycle of civil infrastructure, resulting in less maintenance and lower costs to taxpayers, JEC Group reported. The new Center for Integration of Composites into Infrastructure, an NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, will highlight the sustainable benefits of using composites in infrastructure construction because traditional methods of repairing roads, bridges and other structures are not working, said Anand Puppala, associate dean for research in UTA’s College of Engineering and the center’s director.

Beak-like water system

Friday, June 19, 2015

UT Arlington College of Engineering researchers' work on a fog-harvesting system that can collect water in arid areas was featured in an article in Mental Floss. The article highlighted bio-inspired innovations that were based on animals' physiology. The UT Arlington system is based on a shorebird's beak and how it collects water.

Geofoam blocks

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

A UT Arlington research team is using giant lightweight geofoam blocks to bolster the earth beneath roads and bridges and slow down the settling of roadways and bridges, GCR reported. Anand Puppala, UT Arlington associate dean for research in the College of Engineering and distinguished scholar professor in the Civil Engineering Department, said that the majority of the world's largest cities, often built in areas near water bodies, have soft and compressible soils. The blocks would help alleviate that soft soil.

New pollution rules coming

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

The Need for the Truth blog questioned a CNN report about how well the U.S. economy is performing. In the article, Melanie Sattler, a UT Arlington civil engineering associate professor, said more and more oil and natural gas wells are being drilled in urban areas. The article said that new pollution rules could mean thousands of those wells would have to have their leaks fixed.

Bolstering the Earth with blocks

Monday, June 15, 2015

A UT Arlington research team is using giant lightweight geofoam blocks to bolster the earth beneath roads and bridges and slow down the settling of roadways and bridges, Civil + Structural EngineerThe Edge and Congoo reported. Anand Puppala, UT Arlington associate dean for research in the College of Engineering and distinguished scholar professor in the Civil Engineering Department, said that the majority of the world's largest cities, often built in areas near water bodies, have soft and compressible soils. The blocks would help alleviate that soft soil.

Smarter care for seniors

Monday, June 15, 2015

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington hope that intelligent care technology in apartments and homes in the future will reduce risks and costs encountered by older adults and those with disabilities who want to live independently, Property Management Insider reported. Such an apartment, filled with special sensors that measure the health of its occupants and compile data that could detect illness or injury, debuted in May in Fort Worth.

Solving problems

Friday, June 12, 2015

A UT Arlington research team is using giant lightweight geofoam blocks to bolster the earth beneath roads and bridges and slow down the settling of roadways and bridges, Phys.org and e Science News reported. Anand Puppala, UT Arlington associate dean for research in the College of Engineering and Distinguished Scholar Professor in the Civil Engineering Department, said that the majority of the world's largest cities, often built in areas near water bodies, have soft and compressible soils. He said this research will help alleviate those road and bridge problems.

It all adds up

Friday, June 12, 2015

Lockheed Martin, a global security and aerospace company, estimates that widely used software testing methods developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology can trim test planning and design costs by up to 20 percent, while greatly improving the thoroughness of product and system testing during development, SC Online reported. Developed with collaborators from The University of Texas at Arlington, NIST’s Advanced Combinatorial Testing System “uses proven mathematical techniques to greatly reduce the number of tests a company needs to perform to ensure the quality of a product or process,” explains NIST computer scientist Richard Kuhn.

Bringing back manufacturing

Thursday, June 11, 2015

UT Arlington researchers — with help from Wal-Mart — are developing a flexible manufacturing system that assembles parts slightly larger than a thimble, Micromanufacturing reported. The theory is that the system could be adapted to different products of different sizes, reducing the manufacturing costs and allowing goods built overseas to be made in the United States. The story originally ran in The Dallas Morning News.

Mathematical techniques

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Lockheed Martin, a global security and aerospace company, estimates that widely used software testing methods developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology can trim test planning and design costs by up to 20 percent, while greatly improving the thoroughness of product and system testing during development, NIST.gov reported. Developed with collaborators from The University of Texas at Arlington, NIST’s Advanced Combinatorial Testing System “uses proven mathematical techniques to greatly reduce the number of tests a company needs to perform to ensure the quality of a product or process,” explains NIST computer scientist Richard Kuhn.

Using composite materials

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

The new Center for Integration of Composites into Infrastructure, a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, will determine how to best use composite materials to extend the life-cycle of civil infrastructure, resulting in less maintenance and lower costs to taxpayers, Phys.org reported.

New technology development

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

UT Arlington is collaborating with the University of Wisconsin, Michigan State University and a North Carolina-based company to develop compact and efficient ultraviolet lasers under a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency grant, Laser Focus World reported. The new technology has applications in the military, medical and communications sectors.

Bringing back manufacturing

Monday, June 8, 2015

The seeds for a U.S. manufacturing renaissance are being sewn in east Fort Worth, where researchers are pioneering automated technologies that could restore stateside products production, the Fort Worth Business Press reported. As one of seven recipients of Walmart Foundation grant money awarded last year, UTARI is using its $229,214 to develop flexible assembly lines. Using the same equipment for multiple products in multiple sizes could cut manufacturing costs and strengthen what Wal-Mart officials call a “reshoring” of U.S jobs sent overseas years ago. UTARI held a U.S. Manufacturing Symposium Wednesday.

Better batteries

Monday, June 8, 2015

David Wetz, a UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, is studying how batteries behave when run at the highest rates for the U.S. Navy, In Compliance Magazine reported.

Improving emergency response

Monday, June 8, 2015

As North Texas continues to dry out, leaders from across the area met last week to discuss the challenges posed by the flooding. They are working to improve emergency response going forward, the Dallas Sun and eWallStreeter reported. The story orgininally aired on KXAS NBC 5

Water experts

Friday, June 5, 2015

Water experts from North Texas cities, agencies, federal groups and universities met at UT Arlington yesterday and today to identify challenges and develop solutions to flooding problems the region experienced in May, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, KXAS NBC 5, WFAA Channel 8 and KTVT CBS 11 reported. D.J. Seo, a UT Arlington associate professor of civil engineering, organized the workshop. Seo's work using a new radar system and crowdsourcing helps answer urban  flooding problems.

Flexible manufacturing

Friday, June 5, 2015

UT Arlington researchers — with help from Wal-Mart — are developing a flexible manufacturing system that assembles parts slightly larger than a thimble, Congoo reported. The theory is that the system could be adapted to different products of different sizes, reducing the manufacturing costs and allowing goods built overseas to be made in the United States. The story originally ran in The Dallas Morning News.

Equipment grant

Friday, June 5, 2015

UT Arlington researchers have been awarded a $744,300 grant from the Department of Defense Peer Reviewed Orthapaedic Research Program to create an adaptive interface that fits between a prosthetic and a patient’s limb, The Art of Service reported in listing a number of research projects that deal with amputees.

Better identification through lasers

Friday, June 5, 2015

Compact ultraviolet lasers could identify dangerous substances from a distance, NASA Tech Briefs reported. UT Arlington is a partner in the project, which is being led by the University of Wisconsin.

Bringing back manufacturing

Thursday, June 4, 2015

UT Arlington researchers — with help from Wal-Mart — are developing a flexible manufacturing system that assembles parts slightly larger than a thimble, The Dallas Morning News reported. The theory is that the system could be adapted to different products of different sizes, reducing the manufacturing costs and allowing goods built overseas to be made in the United States. “We have to learn how to be more competitive, smarter and more cost-efficient,” Mickey McCabe, executive director of the UT Arlington Research Institute said Wednesday at its annual U.S. Manufacturing Symposium in Fort Worth.

Small motors focus

Thursday, June 4, 2015

UT Arlington’s robotic system is focused on the assembly of small motors used in many electrical items — from toys to kitchen appliances, The Dallas Morning News Biz Beat Blog reported. Aditya Das, senior scientist at the UT Arlington Research Institute, hopes to equal the current sale price of such motors — 50 cents — through U.S. manufacturing. “We’re looking at the system as a way to cut costs and improve the reliability – not just in the manufacturing process but in the product — as part of the whole Made in the USA movement,” Das said during an interview in his Fort Worth lab. “It’s about the whole supply chain.”

Battery research

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

David Wetz, UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, is using funding through the Office of Naval Research to determine how batteries age when used at high rates, Green Car Congress.com reported. The project is one of more than a half-dozen grants Wetz has been working on during the last few years that total more than $2 million in funding.

Better batteries

Monday, June 1, 2015

David Wetz, UT Arlington associate professor of electrical engineering, is using funding through the Office of Naval Research to determine how batteries age when used at high rates, Converter News.com and ECNmag.com reported. The project is one of more than a half-dozen grants Wetz has been working on during the last few years that total more than $2 million in funding.

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