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UTA In The News — Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

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Better materials through genome network

A UT Arlington computer and data scientist has won a $250,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a scalable data-mining framework that will help manufacturers quickly discover desired materials for building their products, ECN Mag.com, Congoo News, Hispanic Business.com, Nanowerk.com, Bio-Medicine, TMCnet.com and PDDNet.com reported. Junzhou Huang, an assistant professor of Computer Science & Engineering with an expertise in big data and statistical learning, will design scalable algorithms and a computational framework that can search unprecedented volumes of data detailing the complete set of genes present in numerous materials. The innovation may aid manufacturers in building better, longer-lasting cell phones, satellites or aircraft parts, Huang said.

Educated parents affect child's behavior

A new UT Arlington study has found that a high school senior who lives with two college-educated parents is significantly less likely to drink alcohol or smoke marijuana than a teenager who lives with one parent, Science World Report.com, Health Canal, Medical Xpress.com, Vancouver Desi.com, Science Newsline, Science Daily and Science Codex reported. The research led by Eusebius Small, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work, was recently published in the journal, Social Work in Public Health. In terms of race, the study found that the presence of both parents is an especially strong protective factor for African-American adolescents.

Memoir could help Davis' profile

WFAA/ABC 8 interviewed Allan Saxe, UT Arlington associate professor of political science, about a new memoir by Democratic candidate for governor Wendy Davis. In the book, she admits to having two abortions decades ago. Saxe said the very personal book could add "zest" to what has become a "dreary" governor's race. But he doesn't expect its publication to have a major impact on the outcome. "She may energize a lot of the women who support her," he said, adding that the memoir once again raises Davis' national profile and will help her in the future — regardless of who wins in November.

OSHA grants awarded

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has awarded more than $10 million through the Susan Harwood Training Grant Program to 78 nonprofit organizations, including UT Arlington, OSHA.gov and Hispanic Business.com reported. The program provides grants to fund education and training for workers and employers to help them recognize workplace safety and health hazards, implement injury and illness prevention measures, and inform them of their rights and responsibilities.

Professors garner awards

The NRI Welfare Society of India has awarded two of its annual honors to a pair of University of Texas at Arlington professors noted for their contributions to the field of chemistry and biochemistry, Bio-Medicine reported. In October, Subhrangsu Mandal, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, will receive the Mahatma Gandhi Pravasi Samman Award at a NRI Welfare Society conference in London. Then, in January, Krishnan Rajeshwar, distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, will receive the Hind Rattan Award at another conference in India.

Study shows Mexican students investing in four-year university

La Prensa.Mx and Al Dia Tx.com reported on a study by the Brookings Institute that found Mexican students investing more in four-year universities and colleges in the U.S., especially in Texas. In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, UT Arlington ranks among the popular choices of school for Mexicans.