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UTA In The News — Friday, March 15, 2019

Friday, March 15, 2019

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One-of-a-kind wind tunnel

Luca Maddalena, UTA associate professor of aerospace engineering and director of the Aerodynamics Research Center, successfully created an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel, the only one of its kind at a university in the United States, InComplianceMag.com reported.

Curriculum and instruction rankings

OnlineMasters.com ranked UTA among its Top Master’s in Curriculum and Instruction Programs for 2019, PRweb.com reported.

Consortium leads to innovations

A technology consortium including the city of Arlington and UTA has spawned new innovative methods using advanced pipeline assessment technology to help cities better manage and understand their underground infrastructure, TrenchlessTechnology.com reported.

Ultrasound waves grants

Haiying Huang, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UTA, has earned a pair of grants worth nearly $900,000 to monitor structural health and use ultrasound waves to detect structural damage in ships' hulls, Phys.org reported.

Food transportation efficiency

Caroline Krejci, an assistant professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department at UTA, will use a $299,310 grant from the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education program to show how farmers and ranchers can make food transportation more efficient, Bioengineer.org and Phys.org reported.

Tattoo therapy

Research by December Maxwell, UTA doctoral student in the School of Social Work, on the therapeutic value of tattoos for survivors of sexual assault was highlighted by CNN Philippines and western Michigan's FOX17online.com.

STEM festival

UTA participated in the Pi Day Math Festival in the Dallas Arts District on March 14. The event is designed to show how STEM fields connect to most spheres of human activity, including the arts, humanities and design, ScientificAmerican.com reported.

Strengthening 3D printing

Rhugdhrivya Rane, a UTA mechanical and aerospace engineering doctoral student, offered in his thesis some ways to improve the strength of parts in 3D printing for use in many applications, 3DPrint.com reported.