Skip to content. Skip to main navigation.

Profiles

avatar
University of Leeds, UK
PhD
Molecular Microbiology
University of West Indies, Barbados
Chemistry
January 2010
January 2013
Assist Professor
The University of Texas Arlington
January 2009
January 2010
Research Specialist
St Jude Children’s Research Hospital
January 2006
January 2009
Postdoctoral Fellow
University of Tennessee Health Sci. Center
January 2005
January 2006
Research Asocciate
University of Leeds, U.K.
July 1999
September 2001
QA/QC Microbiologist
Lentec Inc, Barbados
Molecular Mechanisms of Action and Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Agents

Antibiotics are essential in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases, yet their utility is continually being diminished by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms.My research explores the molecular action of antimicrobial agents against pathogenic bacteria; through inter-disciplinary collaboration we progress the discovery and development of novel agents that have a potential to treat serious infections.

2013
Wu X and Hurdle J.G. (2013). The Membrane as a Novel Target Site for Antibiotics to KillPersisting Bacterial Pathogens. In Gualerzi, Antibiotics - Targets, Mechanisms and Resistance (185-206). Wiley (In Press).
Book Chapter
In-press
2013
Shen L, M Maddox M, Adhikari S, Bruhn DF, Kumar M, Lee RE, Hurdle JG, Lee RE, Sun D. Syntheses and evaluation of macrocyclic engelhardione analogs as antitubercular and antibacterial agents. J Antibiot (Tokyo). 2013 Jun;66(6):319-25
Journal Article
Published
2013
Wu X, Cherian PT, Lee RE, Hurdle JG. The membrane as a target for controlling hypervirulent Clostridium difficile infections. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2013 Apr;68(4):806-15.
Journal Article
Published
2012
Sun D, Hurdle JG, Lee R, Lee R, Cushman M, Pezzuto JM. Evaluation of Flavonoid and Resveratrol Chemical Libraries Reveals Abyssinone II as a Promising Antibacterial Lead. ChemMedChem. 2012 Sep;7(9):1541-5
Journal Article
In-press
2011
Brown JR, North EJ, Hurdle JG, Morisseau C, Scarborough JS, Sun D, Korduláková J, Scherman MS, Jones V, Grzegorzewicz A, Crew RM, Jackson M, McNeil MR, Lee RE. The structure-activity relationship of urea derivatives as anti-tuberculosis agents. Bioorg Med Chem. 2011 (In Press Jul 24 PMID:21840723)
Journal Article
Published
2011
Hurdle, J.G., Heathcott, A.E., Yang, L., Yan. B., Lee, R.E. (2011) Reutericyclin and related analogues kill stationary phase Clostridium difficile at achievable colonic concentrations. J Antimicrob Chemother; 66:1773-6.
Journal Article
Published
2011
Hurdle, J.G., O’Neill, A.J., Chopra I. and Lee, R.E. (2011) Targeting bacterial membrane function: an underexploited mechanism for treating persistent infections.  Nat. Rev. Microbiol;9:62-75.
Journal Article
Published
2010
Hevener, K., Yun, M.K., Qi, J., Kerr, I., Babaoglu, K., Hurdle, J., Balakrishna, K., White, S. and Lee, R.  (2010) Structural studies of pterin-based inhibitors of dihydropteroate synthase. J. Med. Chem.;53:166-77.
Journal Article
Published
2009
Sun, D., Scherman, M. S., Jones, V., Hurdle, J.G., Lenaerts, A. J., McNeill, M. R. and Lee, R.E. Discovery, synthesis and biological evaluation of piperidinol analogs with anti-tuberculosis activity. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 17:3588-3599
Journal Article
Published
2009
Hurdle, J.G., Yendapally, R., Sun D and Lee, R.E. (2009)   Evaluation of analogs of reutericyclin as prospective candidates for staphylococcal skin infections. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 53:4028-31.
Journal Article
Published
2009
Budha, N.R., Lee, R., Hurdle, J.G., Lee, R.E. and Meibohm, B. (2009) Simple in vitro PK/PD model system to determine time-kill curves of drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis (Edinb); 89:378-85.
Journal Article
Published
2008
Hurdle JG, Lee RB, Budha NR, Carson EI, Qi J, Scherman MS, Cho SH, McNeil MR, Lenaerts AJ, Franzblau SG, Meibohm B, Lee R. A microbiological assessment of novel nitrofuranylamides as antituberculosis agents J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 62:1037-45
Journal Article
Published
2008
Grimes, K. D., Lu, Y., Zhang, Y., Luna, V. A., Hurdle, J. G., Carson, E. I., Qi, J., Kudrimoti, S., Rock, C. O., and Lee, R.E. (2008) Novel acylphosphate mimetics that target PlsY, an essential acyltransferase in Gram-positive bacteria. Chem. Med. Chem. 3:1936-1945.
Journal Article
Published
2008
Yendapally, R, Hurdle, J.G, Carson, E. and Lee, R. (2008).  N-Substituted 3-Acetyltetramic acid derivatives as antibacterial agents. J. Med. Chem. 51:1487-91.
Journal Article
Published
2005
Hurdle, J.G., O’Neill, A.J., and Chopra, I (2005). Prospects for aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors as new antibacterial agents. Antimicrob. Agents and Chemother.  49, 4821-33.
Journal Article
Published
2005
Hurdle, J.G., O’Neill, A.J., Mody, L., Bradley, S.F. and Chopra, I.  (2005). In vivo transfer of high-level mupirocin resistance from Staphylococcus epidermidis to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with failure of mupirocin prophylaxis. J. Antimicrob. Chemother.  56, 1166-8.
Journal Article
Published
2004
Hurdle, J.G., O’Neill, A.J. and Chopra, I. (2004). The isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase mutation V588F conferring mupirocin resistance in glycopeptide-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus is not associated with a significant fitness burden. J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 53, 102-4.
Journal Article
Published
2004
Hurdle, J.G., O’Neill, A.J. and Chopra, I. (2004). Anti-staphylococcal activity of indolmycin a potential topical agent for control of staphylococcal infections. J. Antimicrob. Chemother.  53, 549-52.
Journal Article
Published
2004
Hurdle, J.G., O’Neill, A.J., Ingham, E., Fishwick, C. and Chopra, I. (2004).  Analysis of mupirocin resistance and fitness in Staphylococcus aureus by molecular genetic and structural modelling techniques.  Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 48, 4366- 76.
Journal Article
Published
January 2011 -
January 2016
Nature inspired treatments for persistent C. difficile infections
$1,900,000
Fall 2014
BIOL 4317 - BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS
Office Hours
DayStartEnd
Monday9:15AM10:45AM
Wednesday9:15AM10:45AM
This course provides fundamental and recent information on the mechanism of pathogenesis used by major bacterial pathogens, with a look at the genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies adopted by bacteria to avoid being killed by host immune system and antimicrobials, to cause disease or survive.
Last Updated on August 20, 2014, 9:43 am
Fall 2014
BIOL 5317 - BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS
Office Hours
DayStartEnd
Monday9:15AM10:45AM
Wednesday9:15AM10:45AM
This course provides fundamental and recent information on the mechanism of pathogenesis used by major bacterial pathogens, with a look at the genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies adopted by bacteria to avoid being killed by host immune system and antimicrobials, to cause disease or survive.
Last Updated on August 20, 2014, 9:45 am
Fall 2013
BIOL 4317 - BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS
This course provides fundamental and recent information on the mechanism of pathogenesis used by major bacterial pathogens, with a look at the genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies adopted by bacteria to avoid being killed by host immune system and antimicrobials, to cause disease or survive.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Fall 2013
BIOL 5317 - BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS
This course provides fundamental and recent information on the mechanism of pathogenesis used by major bacterial pathogens, with a look at the genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies adopted by bacteria to avoid being killed by host immune system and antimicrobials, to cause disease or survive.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Spring 2013
BIOL 5440 - Laboratory Methods in Bacterial Pathogenesis
This course is intended enable students in ‘research-oriented’ studies in bacterial pathogenesis and medical microbiology.It provides students with a practical understanding of immunological, microbiological and molecular techniques to identify pathogens, detect virulence, and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance genes.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Spring 2013
BIOL 4440 - Laboratory Methods in Bacterial Pathogenesis
This course is intended enable students in ‘research-oriented’ studies in bacterial pathogenesis and medical microbiology.It provides students with a practical understanding of immunological, microbiological and molecular techniques to identify pathogens, detect virulence, and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance genes.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Fall 2012
BIOL 5317 - BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS
 This course provides fundamental and recent information on the mechanism of pathogenesis used by major bacterial pathogens, with a look at the genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies adopted by bacteria to avoid being killed by host immune system and antimicrobials, to cause disease or survive.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Fall 2012
BIOL 4317 - BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS
This course provides fundamental and recent information on the mechanism of pathogenesis used by major bacterial pathogens, with a look at the genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies adopted by bacteria to avoid being killed by host immune system and antimicrobials, to cause disease or survive.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Spring 2012
BIOL 5310 - Bioinformatics
A research course for Graduate students to evaluate and develop laboratory methods for a future undergraduate course on laboratory skills in bacterial pathogenesis.  Students will be required to research and test methods that are suitable for an undergraduate class format.This course will use molecular and classical techniques for the isolation, identification, and characterization of pathogenic bacteria and analysis of bacterial response to stimuli.  Techniques may include PCR, Gene Sequencing, SDS-PAGE and serotyping.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Fall 2011
BIOL 3444 - General Microbiology
This course is designed to provide you with the basic information about a microbial cell. At the end of the course, you must be able to understand and describe: structural differences between Gram-positive, Gram-negative and Archaeal bacteria; the growth phases of a microbe, describing events at each phase; metabolic pathways used to generate energy in prokaryotes; microbial transcription, translation and replication; effects of mutations on microbial growth, evolution and microbial diversity; how microbes cause diseases and response of host defense; epidemiology of infectious diseases; beneficial role of microbes on earth and human society. It is anticipated that you should appreciate the diversity of microbial systems and ecological interactions with eukaryotes.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Fall 2011
BIOL 3444 - General Microbiology
This course is designed to provide you with the basic information about a microbial cell. At the end of the course, you must be able to understand and describe: structural differences between Gram-positive, Gram-negative and Archaeal bacteria; the growth phases of a microbe, describing events at each phase; metabolic pathways used to generate energy in prokaryotes; microbial transcription, translation and replication; effects of mutations on microbial growth, evolution and microbial diversity; how microbes cause diseases and response of host defense; epidemiology of infectious diseases; beneficial role of microbes on earth and human society. It is anticipated that you should appreciate the diversity of microbial systems and ecological interactions with eukaryotes.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Fall 2011
BIOL 3444 - General Microbiology
This course is designed to provide you with the basic information about a microbial cell. At the end of the course, you must be able to understand and describe: structural differences between Gram-positive, Gram-negative and Archaeal bacteria; the growth phases of a microbe, describing events at each phase; metabolic pathways used to generate energy in prokaryotes; microbial transcription, translation and replication; effects of mutations on microbial growth, evolution and microbial diversity; how microbes cause diseases and response of host defense; epidemiology of infectious diseases; beneficial role of microbes on earth and human society. It is anticipated that you should appreciate the diversity of microbial systems and ecological interactions with eukaryotes.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm
Fall 2011
BIOL 3444 - General Microbiology
This course is designed to provide you with the basic information about a microbial cell. At the end of the course, you must be able to understand and describe: structural differences between Gram-positive, Gram-negative and Archaeal bacteria; the growth phases of a microbe, describing events at each phase; metabolic pathways used to generate energy in prokaryotes; microbial transcription, translation and replication; effects of mutations on microbial growth, evolution and microbial diversity; how microbes cause diseases and response of host defense; epidemiology of infectious diseases; beneficial role of microbes on earth and human society. It is anticipated that you should appreciate the diversity of microbial systems and ecological interactions with eukaryotes.
Last Updated on July 30, 2013, 3:03 pm