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Beginning August 3rd, the Psychology Department will be open from 10AM to 3PM. Masks will be required by all visitors

The University of Texas at ArlingtonThe University of Texas at Arlington

Psychology

Dr. William Ickes

Distinguished Professor of Psychology

Email: ickes@uta.edu
Phone: (817) 272-3229
Address: Room 510, Life Sciences Bldg.
Website: Click to View

Description of Research

The current focus of the UT-Arlington Social Interaction Lab is the study of a number of new personality dimensions that we have introduced: adherence to conventional morality (CM), strength of sense-of-self (SOS), affect intensity for anger and frustration (AIAF), and thin-skinned ego defensiveness (ED).
 
In the two decades from 1988 to 2009, the major focus of our lab was the study of empathic accuracy and other aspects of intersubjective social cognition. Most of this research is summarized in Everyday Mind Reading: Understanding What Other People Think and Feel (2003).
 
In the decade from 1975-1985, and occasionally thereafter, our research focused primarily on personality influences on social behavior. In this research, we used the unstructured dyadic interaction paradigm to study the influences of birth order, gender roles, and various personality traits on naturally occurring social interaction. This research is summarized in Strangers in a Strange Lab: How Personality Shapes Our Initial Encounters with Others (2009).
 
 
DOWNLOADS for PSYC 3301 (Human Relations)
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DOWNLOADS FOR PSYC 3314 (Personality)
DOWNLOADS FOR PSYC 4411 (Advanced Topics in Personality)

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Publications and Other Links

ResearchGate online database 

Empathic accuracy (everyday mind reading)

Intersubjective social cognition

Subjective and intersubjective paradigms for the study of social cognition

Methods for studying naturalistic social interaction

Sex roles (gender roles) and relationships

Personality and social behavior

Books

Book chapters

Intellectual ancestry

Honors and awards

Editorial experience

Social interaction lab

Three faces of Bill