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Scene & Noted

U.S.-Mexico War Exhibit

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    1A letter dated April 2, 1849, to Maj. John B. Butler regarding the presidential campaign and election of Zachary Taylor.

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    2Letters from DeLancey Floyd-Jones to his sister dating from 1846-48 and discussing current Mexican politics.

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    3“Henry Clay’s Advice to His Countrymen,” a speech about the war with Mexico by the Kentucky politician at a Whig Party rally Nov. 13, 1847.

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    4A decorative powder horn inscribed with “G.W.K.” for former owner George Wilkins Kendall (c. 1850). Made from horn, silver, and cut glass.

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    5A “Map of Mexico, including Yucatan and upper California,” by S. Augustus Mitchell (1847). It’s an engraved transfer color lithograph, 43 x 64 cm. 

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    6“Burying the Dead after the Battle of Monterey” (1848). A decalcomania depicting the aftermath of the bloody, three-day siege.

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    7A political cartoon that shows President James Polk carving a pie labeled “Mexico,” with a bottle labeled “Monterey” on the table and a dog representing an unknown political figure chained to his chair (c. 1846).

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    8A lithograph featuring Mexican Gen. Pedro de Ampudia “treating for the capitulation of Monterey” with U.S. Gen. Zachary Taylor on Sept. 24, 1846.

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    9A lithograph featuring President James Polk and Vice President George Dallas, along with small inset maps of the Oregon and Texas territories, which Polk pledged to acquire during his presidential campaign (1845).

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    10“Los Gobernantes de Mexico” by Manuel Rivera (1872). The page on the left features a lithograph of Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna from 1829.

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    11The journal of John F. Meginness, an American soldier stationed in Mexico City (1848). Meginness would later become a newspaper editor.

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    12Sheet music for “The Field of Monterey Ballad” (1846). The Battle of Monterey took place in September 1846 when Gen. Zachary Taylor led 6,500 troops and volunteers.

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    13A hand-colored lithograph by Carl Nebel showing Gen. Winfield Scott’s entrance into Mexico. This was part of the larger War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated (1851), which featured Nebel’s renderings of all the principal conflicts, along with descriptions of each battle by George Wilkins Kendall.

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    14“Manifiesto del Congreso del Estado de Veracruz, a la nacion” broadside (1847). This was issued one day after U.S. forces landed near Veracruz.

‘A CONTINENT DIVIDED’

When the United States annexed Texas in 1845, it started a chain of events that led to what we now know as the U.S.-Mexico War. But despite its historical significance—the conflict resulted in the United States gaining more than half of Mexico’s territory—collective knowledge of the war is filtered through an American lens. As one of the premier repositories on the topic, the UT Arlington Library’s Special Collections is trying to correct this imbalance. Its “A Continent Divided” project makes available for the first time online one of the largest collections of primary source materials on the U.S.-Mexico War. The items are presented with a bi-national focus, which allows an examination of the war’s place in the larger history of North America. An exhibit featuring some of the materials was on display in the Central Library over the summer. Learn more at library.uta.edu/usmexicowar.

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