Educational Technology Support Services
Lecture Capture

Lecture Capture

UT Arlington has endeavored to provide the most advanced instructional technology tools available. One of our most successful programs has been the implementation of the Echo360 Video Capture system. Video capture technology is used by over 100 faculty in a variety of ways to enhance student learning, including live and pre-recorded lectures that can be distributed via Bb or social media for use by students as a study guide or as part of a flipped classroom. During the 2012 fall semester these instructional recordings were accessed over 140,000 times by students. Echo360 captures 2 video sources as well as an audio feed for a complete rendering of the classroom experience.

Most rooms are equipped with a fixed camera and a microphone mounted to the ceiling. The Echo360 device is mounted in an out of the way area with the feeds from the camera, microphone, and the projector. The advantage to this setup is instructors are not required to power up, operate, or have any involvement with the recording. They come to class, teach as normal, and the presentation is sent to them via e-mail.

Sixty classrooms are currently equipped with either SD or HD video capture technology, including:

The rooms marked with an asterisk (*) do not have live streaming capability.

For more information contact:
Don Lane, Manager of Technical Operations
e-mail dklane@uta.edu or phone 817-272-3296

Video capture is one of the best pedagogical tools available on campus today.

Sometimes just getting access to a classroom equipped with your favorite instructional technology can be a challenge. Video capture is an extremely valuable tool for enhancing student learning outcomes, and one that students have come to rely on, so when my class was assigned a room without Echo360 I had to find another solution to meet student needs. I configured my laptop to capture the course lectures, which I edit for content and then post to Blackboard. Admittedly this is not the perfect solution, but it speaks volumes about the flexibility of current classroom technology.

Dr. Marcus Butts
assistant professor of management