First-Year Writing

Justin Lerberg

Justin Lerberg

Email: jlerberg@uta.edu

Office: 203E Carlisle Hall

Jo Ward

Coordinator

Developmental English Program

Jo Ward

Email: joaward@uta.edu

Office: 202 Carlisle Hall

Coordinator:: Developmental English Program

Courses

This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

Core Objectives:

  • Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.
  • Communication Skills: To include effective development and expression of ideas through written, oral, and visual communication.
  • Teamwork: To include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal.
  • Personal Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making.

Expected Learning Outcomes. By the end of ENGL 1301, students should be able to demonstrate:

Rhetorical Knowledge

  • Use knowledge of the rhetorical situation—author, audience, exigence, constraints—to analyze and construct texts
  • Compose texts in a variety of genres, expanding their repertoire beyond predictable forms
  • Adjust voice, tone, diction, syntax, level of formality, and structure to meet the demands of different rhetorical situations

Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing

  • Use writing, reading, and discussion for inquiry, learning, communicating, and examining assumptions
  • Employ critical reading strategies to identify an author’s position, main ideas, genre conventions, and rhetorical strategies
  • Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts
  • Find, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate sources to inform, support, and situate their own claims
  • Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts

Processes

  • Practice flexible strategies for generating, revising, and editing texts
  • Practice writing as a recursive process that can lead to substantive changes in ideas, structure, and supporting evidence through multiple revisions
  • Use the collaborative and social aspects of writing to critique their own and others’ texts

Conventions

  • Apply knowledge of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote from sources using appropriate documentation style
  • Control such surface features as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
  • Employ technologies to format texts according to appropriate stylistic conventions
Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

Core Objectives:

Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.

Communication Skills: To include effective development and expression of ideas through written, oral, and visual communication.

Teamwork: To include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal.

Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making.

Expected Learning Outcomes

In ENGL 1302, students build on the knowledge and information that they learned in ENGL 1301. By the end of ENGL 1302, students should be able to:

Rhetorical Knowledge

  • Identify and analyze the components and complexities of a rhetorical situation
  • Use knowledge of audience, exigence, constraints, genre, tone, diction, syntax, and structure to produce situation-appropriate argumentative texts, including texts that move beyond formulaic structures
  • Know and use special terminology for analyzing and producing arguments
  • Practice and analyze informal logic as used in argumentative texts

Critical Reading, Thinking, and Writing

  • Understand the interactions among critical thinking, critical reading, and writing
  • Find, evaluate, and analyze primary and secondary sources for appropriateness, timeliness, and validity
  • Produce situation-appropriate argumentative texts that synthesize sources with their own ideas and advance the conversation on an important issue
  • Provide valid, reliable, and appropriate support for claims, and analyze evidentiary support in others’ texts

Processes

  • Practice flexible strategies for generating, revising, and editing complex argumentative texts
  • Engage in all stages of advanced, independent library research
  • Practice writing as a recursive process that can lead to substantive changes in ideas, structure, and supporting evidence through multiple revisions
  • Use the collaborative and social aspects of writing to critique their own and others’ arguments

Conventions

  • Apply and develop knowledge of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics, and be aware of the field-specific nature of these conventions
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote from sources using appropriate documentation style
  • Revise for style and edit for features such as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling
  • Employ technologies to format texts according to appropriate stylistic conventions
  • What Is Developmental Education?

    Developmental education in English is designed to improve your critical reading and writing skills. Your score on the placement exam will determine your need for developmental education. Grades earned in developmental courses and workshops do not calculate into overall grade point average but do appear on your transcript.

    Writing Resources

    Awards

    This award for exemplary writing in the First-Year Writing program honors Duncan W. Robinson's legacy. A judging committee selected from instructors in the program evaluates synthesis essays from 1301...

    Awards