Music Education

The Bachelor of Music prepares the student for certification in All Level Choral Certification and All Level Instrumental Certification. When requirements for the Bachelor of Music Degree are completed, an application is made to the College of Education and Health Professions for completing courses in preparation for receiving a Texas Teacher Certificate. Numerous courses in instrumental and choral conducting, instrumental and choral methods, woodwind, brass, string, and percussion class, early childhood music, elementary music, strategies and assessment in music pedagogy, and introduction to music pedagogy are offered to help prepare students for careers in music education.

Description of Courses

Course Description: Comprehensive survey of instrumental, choral and elementary music through lecture and research pertaining to professional responsibilities and career opportunities.

Course Objectives:

  1. Write his/her philosophy of music education.
  2. Identify critical attributes of a successful music educator.
  3. Define his/her personal strengths and weaknesses as a potential music educator.
  4. Write a reverse lesson plan.
  5. Report career opportunities in music education.
  6. Describe the development of music education in America.
  7. Articulate justifications for music education in the public schools.
  8. Describe methods of incorporating technology in music education classrooms.
  9. List and navigate music education web sites.
  10. Locate music education research sources.
  11. Cite the copyright law with regard to photocopying music.
  12. Discuss methods of incorporating classroom management.
  13. Develop a time management organizational system.
  14. Discuss ethics in music education.
  15. Discuss diversity in music education.
  16. Discuss the different teaching settings in music -- early childhood, elementary, band, orchestra, and choir.

Course Description: This class will focus on musical characteristics of young children, folksong and composed literature, performance activities, song analysis, and techniques for reading and writing music.

Course Objectives:

Each class member will:

  1. have an understanding of and be able to successfully engage students in pattern instruction, singing, chanting, movement, playing of instruments, and listening.
  2. be able to apply an understanding of individual differences among students to the preparation of early childhood music lessons.
  3. be able to plan developmentally appropriate early childhood music curricula.

Course Description: This class will focus on perception as it relates to children's development and participation in music through singing, chanting, moving, and playing instruments. Major approaches to music education, such as Music Learning Theory, Orff Schulwerk, and Kodaly, will be explored.

Course Objectives:

Each class member will:

  1. have an understanding of and be able to successfully engage students in pattern instruction, singing, chanting, movement, playing of instruments, and listening.
  2. be able to apply an understanding of individual differences among students to the preparation of elementary music lessons.
  3. be able to plan developmentally appropriate elementary music curricula.
  4. be proficient on the recorder and piano.
  5. be able to evaluate student achievement through the use of appropriate tests and performance measures.
  6. be able to teach elementary music to special populations using appropriate methods and materials.

Course Description: Current trends in music education will be examined. Topics include behavior management, learning styles, students with special needs, exceptional students, and examination of major learning theories and principles of cognitive, social, emotional, physical and aesthetic development. This course will also examine a variety of assessment techniques that are used in a music classroom. Assessment tools such as rubrics, rating scales, National Standards, TEKS, TAKS, and TExES will be examined and implemented into lesson planning. This course has a field experience component.

Course Objectives:

  1. Explain the educational learning theories of Piaget, Dewey, Erickson, Montessori, and Vygotsky.
  2. Define learning modalities, learning styles, and multiple intelligences.
  3. Evaluation his/her learning modalities and learning style.
  4. Apply the various learning modalities and learning styles to musical instruction.
  5. Discuss appropriate classroom management techniques.
  6. Identify terminology and Texas state laws regarding diversity in the classroom.
  7. Discuss methods of inclusion of special learners in the music classroom.
  8. Construct continuous and additive rating scales.
  9. Explain and create observation assessment and performance measures.

Course Description: Supervised and directed practice in local schools. The student will be assigned to a public school site for five hours per week. Weekly seminars are required. Field-based experience must be taken the semester immediately preceding student teaching residency.

Course Objectives:

  1. Observe veteran teachers and glean classroom management skills.
  2. Practice teaching skills, such as warming up ensembles, teaching small groups, teaching small activities.
  3. Practice his or her professionalism in the teaching profession through dress, punctuality, and professional conduct.

Description of Courses: These courses investigate the factors relating to the teaching of choral music in the middle school and secondary school and aid in the development of the administrative skills necessary to run an outstanding choral music education program at the middle school and secondary school level. These courses are designed for persons preparing to teach choral music in middle and secondary level public schools. Students in these courses will acquire the knowledge and skills required to successfully manage and teach music to students in choral ensembles. These courses are required for all secondary school music education majors.

Course Objectives:

In general, as a result of exploring the content of this course, students will:

  1. begin to develop a philosophical basis for teaching choral music.
  2. develop the ability to employ the National Standards in Music Education as a tool for organizing content and rehearsal activities in the choral music education classroom.
  3. become cognizant of the variety of teacher tasks involved in rehearsal planning and implementation for the middle and secondary school choral music ensemble.
  4. understand and apply current knowledge and research about vocal development and healthy choral techniques for singers, especially the adolescent "changing voice."
  5. develop a knowledge of sources of choral repertoire appropriate for a variety of choral ensembles.
  6. develop a choral repertoire file that includes music for senior high and middle school choral ensembles.

Description of Courses: These courses investigate the factors relating to the teaching of choral music in the middle school and secondary school and aid in the development of the administrative skills necessary to run an outstanding choral music education program at the middle school and secondary school level. These courses are designed for persons preparing to teach choral music in middle and secondary level public schools. Students in these courses will acquire the knowledge and skills required to successfully manage and teach music to students in choral ensembles. These courses are required for all secondary school music education majors.

Course Objectives:

In general, as a result of exploring the content of this course, students will:

  1. continue to refine a philosophical basis for teaching choral music.
  2. become familiar with the important choral styles and the implications of this knowledge for analyzing the choral score and preparing for choral rehearsals.
  3. become a creative planner familiar with principles of programming, which take into account not only the needs of the students, but also the varying types of schools, cities, regions, or neighborhoods where you might teach.
  4. develop a knowledge of effective administrative techniques necessary for choral music education experiences to be successful.
  5. develop teaching strategies to be employed during the teaching process of choral literature to ensure that students learn more than the correct notes and rhythms used in the literature; but also important historical, cultural, and theoretical aspects of the literature.
  6. refine the ability to employ the National Standards in Music Education as a tool for organizing content and rehearsal

Course Description: Marching Band Techniques is a two hour course open to music majors only which is designed to provide students with a detailed study of history, design concepts, and rehearsal techniques for the contemporary marching band.

Upon successful completion of MUSI 3200 the student will be able to:

  1. Discuss a surface-level understanding of the historical aspects of the traditional U.S. marching band.
  2. Write a rehearsal management plan for winds, percussion, and color guard.
  3. Create a grading system for a marching band ensemble.
  4. Explain the University Interscholastic League rules regarding all disciplines and their competitions.
  5. Understand the basic concepts of uniform design.
  6. Arrange music for a basic marching ensemble.
  7. Complete and synthesize adjudication forms for ensemble competitions.
  8. Develop a calendar for the school year, including off-season.
  9. Develop a consistent performance foundation of an individual ensemble through sound and visual concepts.
  10. Explain how to plan, organize, and fund a marching band trip.
  11. Understand all concepts related to design and implementation of a current day marching band show.
  12. Synthesize and comprehend complex drill writing concepts, including how to produce current-day drill for a typical Texas 2A-3A marching band.

Course Description: This course is a two-hour credit course designed to provide students with a study of administrative issues including philosophy, budgets, organizing the music program, fundraising, public relations, and private lesson programs.

Course Objectives for MUSI 3213:

  1. Write a classroom management plan.
  2. Create a grading system for instrumental music.
  3. Explain the University Interscholastic League rules regarding all disciplines and their competitions.
  4. Locate music web quests and describe their application to secondary instrumental instruction.
  5. Select UIL concert, solo, and ensemble literature that is the appropriate level of difficulty for secondary music students.
  6. Complete adjudication forms for ensemble auditions.
  7. Develop a calendar outlining activities for a band during the school year.
  8. Discuss the legal and ethical issues surrounding the teaching profession.
  9. Create planning calendar for the school year.
  10. Create a concert program, including instructions regarding audience etiquette and advertisements.
  11. Explain how to plan, organize, and fund a school music trip.
  12. Create a unified and systematic rehearsal plan for a large ensemble concert cycle.
  13. Synthesize multiple approaches to the rehearsal process relating to large ensemble practice and performance.

Course Description: This course is a two-hour credit course designed to provide students with a study of literature, music selection, rehearsal and lesson planning, sound production, and rehearsal and performance practices for intermediate and advanced instrumental ensembles.

Course Objectives for MUSI 4213:

  1. Write a classroom management plan.
  2. Create a grading system for instrumental music.
  3. Explain the University Interscholastic League rules regarding all disciplines and their competitions.
  4. Locate music web quests and describe their application to secondary instrumental instruction.
  5. Select UIL concert, solo, and ensemble literature that is the appropriate level of difficulty for secondary music students.
  6. Complete adjudication forms for ensemble auditions.
  7. Develop a calendar outlining activities for a band during the school year.
  8. Discuss the legal and ethical issues surrounding the teaching profession.
  9. Create planning calendar for the school year.
  10. Create a concert program, including instructions regarding audience etiquette and advertisements.
  11. Explain how to plan, organize, and fund a school music trip.
  12. Create a unified and systematic rehearsal plan for a large ensemble concert cycle.
  13. Synthesize multiple approaches to the rehearsal process relating to large ensemble practice and performance.

Course Description: Study historical, philosophical and curricular issues and principles that provide the context for contemporary music education.

Course Objectives:

Each student will be able to discuss the following as a result of reading and discussion experiences:

  1. Why does a music educator need a philosophy of music education?
  2. What are the similarities and differences among the philosophical viewpoints of rationalism, empiricism, and pragmatism? How does these philosophical viewpoints influence music education practices?
  3. What are the similarities and differences among the aesthetic viewpoints of referentialism, formalism, expressionism, and absolute expressionism with regard to the following concepts:
    • Meaning in music
    • Experiencing music
    • Relationships of music and feeling
  4. What principles for teaching music as aesthetic education can be drawn from the aforementioned aesthetic viewpoints? How might such principles be applied in the student's specialization of music education?
  5. What guidelines may music educators follow to teach for aesthetic outcomes during class sessions or rehearsals?
  6. What are the similarities and differences between the music education philosophies espoused by Bennett Reimer and David Elliott?

Objectives for Part III:

Curricular Foundations include the following objective:

Each student will be able to discuss the following as a result of reading and discussion experiences:

  1. Define the term, music curriculum, based on contemporary thought.
  2. Critically review the National Standards for Music Education to determine its influence on contemporary music curriculum development.
  3. Critically review the TEKS curriculum guide relating the guide to the principles and definitions of contemporary music curriculum development.
  4. Apply comprehensive musicianship curriculum principles to planning for music education through performance classes.
  5. Identify curricular models for music education that incorporate aesthetic education principles.
  6. Describe and discuss new and future directions in music curriculum development.

Course Description: A study of the psychological foundations of music education. This course will investigate topics such as perception of and responses to music, the nature of musical attributes, music learning, and the measurement of musical behavior.

Course Objectives:

  1. Provide an overview of psychological principles and research related to the human response of music and to music teaching and learning.
  2. Become acquainted with some of the more important psychological learning theories and their underlying principles.
  3. Research psychological topic of interest related to music education.

Course Description: This course investigates basic concepts of historical, philosophical and qualitative music education research and the factors relating to the analysis, design, and implementation of descriptive or experimental music education research.

Course Objectives:

  1. To become familiar with and develop understanding of descriptive and experimental research studies, terminology, design, and techniques to be used in reading, discussing, analyzing, designing, implementing, and writing research studies in this area.
  2. To analyze data/statistical results in relation to problems of problem statements presented.
  3. To gain knowledge of hypothesis testing.
  4. To develop scholarly research writing style/skills.
  5. To increase skills in problem recognition and problem solving.c 6. To recognize parameters of historical, philosophical, and qualitative research.

Faculty

Dr. Chris Evans, D.M.A. University of Oklahoma

Department of Music

Assistant Professor in Practice, Associate Director of Bands, Director of the Maverick Marching Band

Area: Marching Band, Winds and Percussion

Chris Evans

Email: christopher.evans@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 314

Bio: Dr. Chris Evans is the Associate Director of Bands and Director of the Maverick Marching Band at UTA. In addition to the marching band, Dr. Evans teaches the Symphonic Winds, Symphonic Band, Marching Band Techniques, and Instrumental Methods and Materials. Previously, Dr. Evans was the Associate Director of Bands at Flower Mound High School. While at Flower Mound, he primarily taught the Concert Band and the JV marching band while assisting with all other aspects of the program. Dr. Evans also served as Assistant Director of Bands at Juan Seguin High School and was a graduate assistant at the University of Oklahoma. While at OU he assisted with the concert ensembles, the Pride of Oklahoma marching band, and conducted the women’s basketball band for 2 years. Before graduate school, he taught middle school in Georgia for three years. Dr. Evans, a native of Birmingham, Alabama earned his Bachelors of Music Education from Auburn University. He earned his Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees in Instrumental Conducting from the University of Oklahoma. His professional associations include the Texas Music Educators Association, Kappa Kappa Psi, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia (honorary), and Tau Beta Sigma (honorary).

Dr. Diane Lange, Ph.D. Michigan State

Department of Music

Professor

Area: Music Education

Diane Lange

Email: lange@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-2434

Office: FA 367-B

Bio: Diane Lange is Professor and Music Program Director of Field Experience where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Early Childhood and Elementary Music Education. Dr. Lange received her Bachelor of Music in Education and Master of Music from Central Michigan University and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Additionally, she taught elementary music for ten years in Michigan and Nevada. She received her Orff Levels at Memphis State University and Gordon Institute for Music Learning Levels from Michigan State University. She has presented several national and international pedagogical workshops. Her research interest includes combining Orff Schulwerk and Music Learning Theory, and developing curricular material for elementary-aged students. Dr. Lange has published three books, numerous book chapters and articles, and is a co-author for Jump Right In: The Elementary Music Curriculum, Grades Kindergarten and 5. Dr. Lange was president for the National Gordon Institute for Music Learning and North Texas chapter of American Orff Schulwerk Association, and was regional representative for Early Childhood Music and Movement Association where she hosted an Early Childhood Music Conference. Over the past 20 years, Dr. Lange’s service to the university has included Area Coordinator of Music Education, Associate Chair of the Music Department, Curriculum Chair, and currently she is the chair of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Dr. Lange has received the Outstanding Educator Award from the Crawford AuSable School District and was inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Teachers at the University of Texas at Arlington in spring 2019.

Dr. John Wayman, Ph.D., Fine Arts, Texas Tech University

Department of Music

Assistant Professor

Area: Choral Music Education

John Wayman

Email: john.wayman@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-9269

Office: FA 367-A

Bio: Dr. John Wayman is Assistant Professor of Choral Music Education at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he conducts the University Singers and guides our future choral music educators. Prior to his arrival to UTA, Wayman served as Music Education Coordinator and Director of the Concert Choir at Young Harris College in Georgia. Dr. Wayman has a BAMEd from Wayland Baptist University, a MMEd and Ph.D. from Texas Tech University. As a choral director, Dr. Wayman brings a wealth of information having worked with all levels (elementary-college in Texas and Georgia) in a variety of settings. He is in great demand as an adjudicator and clinician, regularly working with school music programs and directing honor choirs throughout the nation. Dr. Wayman’s areas of specialty consist of the male changing voice, music as an educational tool for the traditional classroom and the development of the preservice teacher. His research has been presented regularly at professional conferences in state (Texas Music Educators Association, Tennessee MEA and Georgia MEA), nationally (National Association for Music Educators, Society of Research for Music Education, Society of Music Teacher Educators) and international venues (International Society of Music Education [Greece and Brazil] , Research in Music Education [England], PASME [Uganda], and most recently working with the choirs and future music educators at the University of Internationalities in Chengdu, China). His work can found in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Teaching Music, Georgia Music News and Symposium on Music teacher Education: Enacting Shared Visions.

Dr. Sergio Espinosa, D.M.A. The University of Iowa

Department of Music

Associate Professor

Area: Music Education

Sergio Espinosa

Email: espinosa@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-2445

Office: FA 304-A

Bio: Mexican conductor and violinist, Dr. Sergio Espinosa is in charge of the String Music Education at the University of Texas Arlington. At the same time, Dr. Espinosa is the Music Director of the New Philharmonic Orchestra of Irving. He combines his time here with his position as Senior Examiner for the International Baccalaureate Organization in Wales, UK. He also maintains an active schedule as clinician in Texas and beyond. Dr Espinosa studied at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, the Conservatoire de Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Diplôme de Capacité Professionnelle de Violon), Ithaca College, New York, (Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting), and received his DMA in Orchestra Conducting from the University of Iowa. His activities as orchestral conductor include: Music Director with the Shoals Symphony Orchestra, Florence, Alabama; assistant conductor with the Orchestre de L'Université de Fribourg, Switzerland; and assistant conductor with the Orchestre Philharmonique Rhodanien, Tournon, France. He has also guest-conducted the Las Colinas-Arlington-Garland Symphony, Rome Festiva Orchestral, Rome, Italy; the Orquesta Sinfónica de Nuevo León; the Orquesta Sinfónica de Michoacán; the Orquesta Sinfónica de Guanajuato; Orquesta de Cámara de Bellas Artes and Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional in Mexico. As a violinist, Dr. Espinosa has been a member of the string quartet Boccherini in Spain and has played with many orchestras, including Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México, Orchestre de Chambre de Neuchâel in Switzerland, Orchestre Municipal de Besançon in France, Orquesta Ciudad de Granada in Spain, Orquesta Do Norte de Portugal, and Fredonia Chamber Players, Cedar Rapids Symphony, and Quad-City Orchestra in the United States. Dr. Espinosa has lead numerous teacher training workshops in different cities such as Sion and Lausanne, Switzerland; Hong-Kong, China; Bogota, Colombia; Calgary, Vancouver, Winnipeg in Canada; New York, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Denver, Albuquerque, Houston, Columbus, Boston, Seattle, Portland, Atlanta, Ft. Lauderdale, in the USA among others.

Jeffrey King, M.M. Trumpet Performance, Southern Methodist University

Department of Music

Adjunct Professor

Area: Music Education

Jeffrey King

Email: jeffrey.king@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-0116

Office: FA 101

Bio: Jeffrey King has recently joined The University of Texas at Arlington Music Education Faculty. Prior to this appointment, Mr. King served as the Director of Fine Arts for the Irving Independent School District where he oversaw all aspects of the Fine Arts Programs in the district. Prior to his administrative duties in Irving ISD, Jeff King was a Texas band director for 31 years. The majority of his teaching career was spent in Duncanville ISD, with 26 years’ experience, culminating as Director of Bands for his last five years. In 2008, Mr. King was co-conductor of the Wind Ensemble, which was selected as the 5A High School State Honor Band. Mr. King co-authored a band warm-up and technique book entitled Foundations for Superior Performance and The Complete Instrument Reference Guide for Band Directors. These texts are widely used throughout North America, Australia, Japan and China. He has presented workshops in over 25 states as well as Canada. In 2007, Mr. King was the Chief Adjudicator for the Melbourne Band Festival held in Melbourne, Australia. In the summers of 2011 and 2019, Mr. King traveled to China, presenting clinics to band directors and students across the country. From 2011-2018, Mr. King served on the Texas Bandmasters Association Board, proudly serving as TBA President in 2017. His professional affiliations include the Texas Music Educators Association, Texas Bandmasters Association, Texas Music Adjudicators Association, National Association for Music Educators, National Band Association, and the honorary music fraternity Phi Beta Mu.

Margaret Brown, M.M Texas Tech University

Department of Music

Adjunct Professor

Area: Music Education

Margaret Brown

Email: margaret.brown@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 109

Bio: Margaret Brown is one of the two founding Orchestra Directors in McKinney ISD. The program prospers and is growing abundantly, now in its fifteenth year of existence. She recently retired as the Director of Orchestras at McKinney North High School, which features monthly Chamber Music Nights, in addition to a full orchestra program and is consistently a UIL Sweepstakes program. Formerly, she taught at Wilson Junior High and began the Irons Junior High School Orchestra in Lubbock, TX, when the school opened in 1989. It soon grew into a Sweepstakes Award winning program, including a chamber music and a full orchestra. Ms. Brown held previous positions in Grand Prairie and Tyler. She served as Conductor of the Lubbock Youth Symphony String Orchestra and also as the Master Teacher for the Texas Tech String Project, an ASTA originated national project that recruits and trains future orchestra directors. Ms. Brown served on the Executive Board of the Texas Orchestra Director’s Association (TODA) for five years, as well as the TexASTA President and Treasurer and Region 16 TMEA Secretary and Orchestra Chair. She is an adjudicator and clinician across the state for various All Region orchestras and contests. Ms. Brown earned the Bachelor of Music Education from Texas Wesleyan University where she studied with Dr. Robert McCashin, and the Master of Music from Texas Tech University where she studied with Dr. Virginia Kellogg. Other memberships include Mu Omicron, TODA, TMAA, and Sigma Alpha Iota. Honors include “Who’s Who Among American Women,” “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers,” “Who’s Who in Music,” and “Who’s Who Among American High School Students.” She also is a PTA Lifetime Membership Honoree. She is in her thirty-fifth year of teaching as she begins her time at UTA as an adjunct music professor and supervisor for student teachers. Gardening, travel and spending time with her family are some of her favorite things in her personal life.

David Dunham, M.M. Baylor University

Department of Music

Assistant Adjunct Professor

Area: Music Education

David Dunham

Email: david.dunham@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 366

Bio: David Dunham is a retired Texas band director with 33 years of classroom teaching experience primarily at the middle school level. The last 19 years of his career were spent in Frisco ISD leading Clark MS and later Fowler MS until his retirement in May of 2019. His ensembles in Frisco ISD have received top awards “Sweepstakes” Award for the last 17 consecutive years and is a 4 time TMEA Honor Band State Finalist. In 2013, the Fowler MS Symphony won the Texas Music Educators Association Middle School Honor Full Orchestra, and in 2015 Fowler MS was the only Middle School Percussion Ensemble in the nation invited to perform and Percussive Arts Society Internal Conference (PASIC). Recently, the Fowler MS Symphonic Band was selected as the Outstanding Middle School Band and Outstanding Middle School Brass for the 2019 Dallas Wind Symphony Invitational Windband Festival. The Jazz program at Fowler MS is one of the the largest in the nation with three competing jazz bands and a 4th jazz band, the 55 member Beginning Jazz Band that starts rehearsing weekly each Spring. The Jazz Band at Fowler was the first ever national winner of the Foundation for Music Education’s Mark of Excellence National Jazz Honors in 2010. In 2018 the Fowler MS Jazz Band 1 won first ever State Champion in the state of Texas and performed in San Antonio as the first ever Invited Middle School Jazz Band in history of The Texas Music Educators Association. There are dozens of former students who achieved Texas All-State Band and Jazz Band, and dozens of former students teaching and/or performing in colleges and conservatories across the country, including three from the Eastman Conservatory of Music in New York, and a former student who has won a Grammy Award. In addition to teaching High Brass Methods at UTA, Mr. Dunham is an active band consultant, clinician, conductor, mentor, band recruiting specialist, national adjudicator, and a frequent contributor to The Instrumentalist national band and orchestra magazine, He is a proud graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, received his masters degree in music education from Baylor University, and has pursued classes towards a doctorate at the University of North Texas. He is a member of the Texas Music Educators Association, Texas Band Masters Association, the American Band Association, Texas Jazz Educators Association, and an active member of the Texas Music Adjudicators Association, Originally from Austin, Texas Mr. Dunham has two grown sons and resides in an “empty nest” with his wife of 30 years Dr. Jocelyn Dunham in Flower Mound, Texas (a suburb of Dallas).

Kathy Draves, M.M. The University of Texas at Arlington

Department of Music

Lecturer

Area: Music Education

Kathy Draves

Email: karen.draves@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 364

Randy Lyle, M.M. in Violin Performance, The University of Texas at Arlington

Department of Music

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Area: Strings, Music Education

Randy Lyle

Email: randal.lyle@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 101

Bio: Randy Lyle currently serves as the Music Director of the B Sharp Youth Music Program, an El Sistema-inspired, free music education program based in Fort Worth. He has taught privately for 13 years, working with several school districts in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex as well as maintaining his own at-home studio. As a performer, he has played with various orchestras, including the Texarkana Symphony, Lawton Philharmonic, and Fort Smith Symphony. A native of Arlington, Mr. Lyle earned a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baylor University and a Master of Music in Violin Performance from the University of Texas at Arlington, studying with Dr. Martha Walvoord.