Music Theory

The Music Department at UTA offers a B.M. in Music with an option in Composition (B.M., Composition Option), and a Masters of Music in Music Theory (M.M., Theory).

B.M and B.M. Composition

Both degrees prepare the undergraduate for a career in graduate studies and beyond through Advanced lessons and seminars. Topics of these upper-level classes include: Sonata Theory, Composition Lessons, Computer-Aided Composition, Schenkerian Analysis, and Generative Theory.

For specific degree requirements, please see the Undergraduate Catalog listing for the Music Degrees.

Undergraduate Catalog

**NOTE FOR ALL INCOMING FRESHMEN**

If you are planning to attend a music program, a certain degree of music literacy is expected PRIOR to enrolling in your first semester of music courses. We STRONGLY RECOMMEND that students visit the following website:

www.musictheory.net/lessons/

We recommend the following sections within this site:

  • THE BASICS: Students must know these materials PERFECTLY before entering Theory/Harmony I (MUSI 1325)
  • RHYTHM AND METER and SCALES AND KEY SIGNATURES: Students need a basic understanding of this material. It is covered in Theory 1, but at a very rapid pace.
  • INTERVALS: We STRONGLY recommend that students work on this material PRIOR to beginning Theory 1- this area is vital to your success in Theory 1 and the more knowledge of this you come in with, the better!
  • CHORDS - Useful to go over in preparation for more detailed work in the semester.

You should continue to use this website, including the remaining chapters, throughout the semester, as an additional resource. If you have any questions, feel free to contact your Theory 1 professor.

Faculty

Dr. Graham Hunt, Ph.D. Duke University

Department of Music

Associate Chair, Professor, Music Theory and Composition Area Coordinator

Area: Music Theory and Composition

Graham Hunt

Email: gghunt@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-2446

Office: FA 304

Bio: Dr. Hunt (Ph.D., Musicology, Duke University, 2001) is currently Professor of Musicology/Music Theory, and the Area Coordinator of UTA’s Theory/Composition Area. He teaches undergraduate courses in Music Theory, Music Appreciation, Orchestration, Ear-Training, and Advanced Music Theory Seminars and graduate courses in Music History and Form. He has won the UTA President's Award for Excellence in Teaching (2010), and was nominated for the University of Texas Regents Board teaching Award in 2011. He has also been nominated for the Piper Professor award and the Gertrude Golladay Outstanding Teaching Award twice, and was promoted to Full Professor in Fall of 2015. His research focuses on music of the 18th and 19th century, including Wagner, Schubert, and Brahms with approaches ranging from formal analysis, sonata theory, and compositional genesis to Schenkerian and Neo-Riemannian analysis. His publications include articles in Music Theory Spectrum, Music Analysis Theory and Practice, Integral, Opera Quarterly, Wagner, Journal of Schenkerian Studies and 19th-century Music Review. He has presented papers at numerous conferences, including the national meeting of SMT (Society for Music Theory) in 2005, 2009, 2012, and 2015, and 2017. His most recent publications and presentations have dealt with Sonata forms in Classical operas by Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. He presented a paper entitled “Don Juan and his ladies: Aria-Sonata Types in Mozart’s Don Giovanni,” and is contributing a chapter to an edited volume entitled Mozart’s Operas: Intrinsic Challenges, External Stakes, to be published by Leuven Press. His article “Diverging Subordinate Themes and Internal Transitions: The Three-Key Exposition Revisited,” will appear in the British journal Music Analysis in 2019. Dr. Hunt has served on the editorial board for several peer-reviewed music theory journals, including Music Theory Spectrum and the Journal for Schenkerian Studies, and recently completed a term as President of the Texas Society of Music Theory (TSMT). He is also an accomplished pianist and bassoonist, having performed as bassoonist in the UTA symphony orchestra (in works such as Elgar’s “Enigma Variations” and Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture) and as pianist in several concerts, including a program of Piano Quartets and complete performances of Schumann's "Dichterliebe" and Vaughn Williams' "Songs of Travel." Most recently, he performed Mozart's 12th Piano Concerto (K. 414) with the FAFCO Orchestra in 2012.

Dr. Elyse Kahler, D.M.A. from Texas Tech University (Music Composition)

Department of Music

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Area: Music Composition

Elyse Kahler

Email: elyse.kahler@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 307

Bio: Elyse Kahler is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at The University of Texas at Arlington. Dr. Kahler writes for a variety of ensembles and levels, and has particular interests in fun and engaging music for middle school students and inspiring music for the modern church. Recent projects include a commission from the Lubbock Chorale (Parallax) with text by Allison Boye, Height Difference Duo (The Hobbit and the Elf), Freedom to Be for The Phoenix Project, From the Ashes, and Perspectives, a chamber work with dance and film in collaboration with Anne Wharton. Dr. Kahler is also passionate about music composition pedagogy and is currently researching methods to discuss the creative process with composition students. During the summers, Dr. Kahler teaches music theory at the Interlochen Arts Camp in Interlochen, MI. For more information, please visit www.elysekahler.com

Joseph Turner, M.M. University of Arizona

Department of Music

Lecturer

Area: Music Theory

Email: joseph.turner@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 326

Bio: Having earned a Master’s degree in music performance (trombone) from the University of Arizona, Joseph Turner is currently a PhD candidate in music theory at the University of North Texas, with related field studies in early music performance. He teaches music theory and aural skills at Dallas Baptist University and the University of Texas at Arlington. His research interests include the history of music theory, particularly 15th century understandings of counterpoint and the place of theory in structures of knowledge. He recently presented at the annual conference of the Society for Christian Scholarship in Music.

Jordan Moore, M.M. Baylor University

Department of Music

Lecturer

Area: Music Theory

Jordan Moore

Email: jordan.moore@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 324

Bio: Jordan Moore is adjunct instructor of music theory at UTA, where he teaches Theory and Ear Training courses. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Music with a concentration in Music Theory (ABD) at the University of North Texas and serves there as a doctoral teaching fellow. Mr. Moore holds a B.M. in Music Theory from Baylor University and a M.M. in Music Theory from Baylor University, where he studied under Timothy McKinney, Jana Millar, and his thesis advisor, Christopher Bartlette. In his master's thesis work, Mr. Moore pursued research in film music cognition entitled "The Impact of Visual-Music Interaction on Music Perception: The Influence of Agreement and Disagreement." Research interests include cognition, pedagogy, and film music, as well as other 20th-century topics including musical theater analysis. Mr. Moore is a member of the National and Texas Societies of Music Theory. As a pianist, Mr. Moore has served as accompanist/music director for musical theatre for the Baylor University Theater Department including a main stage production of Annie Get Your Gun, as well as a performance of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at Repertory Company Theatre in Richardson. He also directed the youth choir at Highland Baptist Church during his time at Baylor. He was a member of Baylor's handbell choir, The Baylor Bronze for four years and served as a graduate assistant director under director Carla David.

Amy Hatch, M.M. Music Theory, Texas State University - San Marcos

Department of Music

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Area: Music Theory

Amy Hatch

Email: amy.hatch@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-3471

Office: FA 109

Bio: Amy Hatch is a PhD candidate and Research Assistant in Music Theory at UNT. Amy earned a B.A. in Music (2011) and an M.M. in Music Theory (2013) from Texas State University - San Marcos, where she was instructor of record for Basic Musicianship under the supervision of her thesis advisor, Dr. Cynthia Gonzales. Amy's current research, with advisor Dr. Ellen Bakulina, includes the work of Russian theorists Ogolevets and Yavorsky, and how these concepts are found in the music of Shostakovich and Prokofiev. Amy's other research interests include Transformation Theory and Music Theory pedagogy/Music Education. She most recently presented on the motivic analysis of David Lee Garza's music at the 2018 SMT/AMS National Conference in San Antonio, TX.

Sean Morrison, M.M. University of North Texas

Department of Music

Lecturer

Area: Musicology/Music History

Email: sean.morrison@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-2471

Office: FA 325

Bio: Coming soon.

Dr. Carol Jessup, D.M.A. University of Michigan

Department of Music

Associate Professor

Area: Music Education

Carol Jessup

Email: jessup@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-2438

Office: FA 366

Bio: Carol Jessup is Associate Professor of Music at the University of Texas at Arlington. She received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in music performance from The University of Michigan where she studied with professors John Mohler and David Shifrin. She is a graduate of Texas Tech University and Michigan State University, and is a student of Keith McCarty and Dr. Elsa Ludewig-Verdehr. Dr. Jessup’s performances include Alice Tully Hall, New York City, and performing as principal clarinet with the Mozarteum Orchestra, Salzburg, Austria. She is nationally known for her extensive work as soloist/clinician, and has appeared as a guest artist at the International Clarinet Symposium, ClarinetFest ’96, ’97, ’03, and ’08, the University of British Columbia (Vancouver), Arizona State University (Tempe), the University of Utah (Salt Lake City), Texas Tech University (Lubbock), the Mid-West National Band and Orchestra Clinic (Chicago), Mid-East Instrumental Music Conference (Pittsburg), Midwestern Conference, Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association (Ann Arbor), Montana State Music Conference (Missoula), the Southern Instrumental Conductors Conference (Hattiesburg), Texas Music Educators Association and Texas Bandmasters Association conventions (San Antonio), and the renowned Interlochen National Arts Camp (Interlochen, MI). Dr. Jessup has had a number of articles on clarinet performance and pedagogy published in recognized journals including the School Band and Orchestra, The Instrumentalist, Southwestern Musician, The School Musician, and with Southern Music Company. Her comprehensive book, Playing and Teaching the Clarinet, published by RBC Music, San Antonio has been highly acclaimed and enthusiastically received.

Dr. Sergio Espinosa, D.M.A. The University of Iowa

Department of Music

Associate Professor

Area: Music Education

Sergio Espinosa

Email: espinosa@uta.edu

Phone #: 817-272-2445

Office: FA 304-A

Bio: Mexican conductor and violinist, Dr. Sergio Espinosa is in charge of the String Music Education at the University of Texas Arlington. At the same time, Dr. Espinosa is the Music Director of the New Philharmonic Orchestra of Irving. He combines his time here with his position as Senior Examiner for the International Baccalaureate Organization in Wales, UK. He also maintains an active schedule as clinician in Texas and beyond. Dr Espinosa studied at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, the Conservatoire de Neuchâtel, Switzerland (Diplôme de Capacité Professionnelle de Violon), Ithaca College, New York, (Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting), and received his DMA in Orchestra Conducting from the University of Iowa. His activities as orchestral conductor include: Music Director with the Shoals Symphony Orchestra, Florence, Alabama; assistant conductor with the Orchestre de L'Université de Fribourg, Switzerland; and assistant conductor with the Orchestre Philharmonique Rhodanien, Tournon, France. He has also guest-conducted the Las Colinas-Arlington-Garland Symphony, Rome Festiva Orchestral, Rome, Italy; the Orquesta Sinfónica de Nuevo León; the Orquesta Sinfónica de Michoacán; the Orquesta Sinfónica de Guanajuato; Orquesta de Cámara de Bellas Artes and Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional in Mexico. As a violinist, Dr. Espinosa has been a member of the string quartet Boccherini in Spain and has played with many orchestras, including Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México, Orchestre de Chambre de Neuchâel in Switzerland, Orchestre Municipal de Besançon in France, Orquesta Ciudad de Granada in Spain, Orquesta Do Norte de Portugal, and Fredonia Chamber Players, Cedar Rapids Symphony, and Quad-City Orchestra in the United States. Dr. Espinosa has lead numerous teacher training workshops in different cities such as Sion and Lausanne, Switzerland; Hong-Kong, China; Bogota, Colombia; Calgary, Vancouver, Winnipeg in Canada; New York, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Denver, Albuquerque, Houston, Columbus, Boston, Seattle, Portland, Atlanta, Ft. Lauderdale, in the USA among others.